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  • 1.
    Roininen, Sari
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ylinenpää, Håkan
    Schumpeterian versus Kirznerian Entrepreneurship: a comparison of academic and non-academic new venturing2009In: Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1462-6004, E-ISSN 1758-7840, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 504-520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Identifying how different modes of resource configuration, entry strategy and product/market characteristics affect new ventures' start-up processes as well as outcomes in terms of firm growth and revenues. Design/methodology/approach - Case studies of three academic spin-offs and three non-academic new ventures is employed as a base for analytical generalisation. Findings - Non-academic ventures and academic spin-offs have different bases for their venture creation and follow different strategies to enter their specific markets. Academic spin-offs are to a larger extent innovative, product-oriented and enter their target markets employing a technology/science-push strategy which requires considerable resources and partner cooperation to manage. The non-academic ventures, on the contrary, exploit emerging opportunities on the market through a market-pull strategy relying mainly on offerings already known to the market and building on their own, in-house resources.Research limitations - Future research should benefit from investigating factors and conditions affecting different ventures' start-up process by utilizing qualitative, in-depth approaches as well as quantitative approaches and a more robust database. Practical implications - Venture creation processes are not uniform but dependent on situational and contextual factors. Overall, academic spin-offs come forward as examples of Schumpeterian entrepreneurship characterised by exploration and innovation, while the more ‘Kirznerian' and non-academic start-ups primarily recognise and exploit upcoming market opportunities based on resources they control. The results highlight challenges for nascent entrepreneurs as well as for policy makers supporting new venture creation.Originality/value - A comparison highlighting critical events, resource configurations and environmental conditions of different start-up processes depending on the new ventures' origin.

  • 2.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Does size matter?: a study of firm behavior and outcomes in strategic SME networks2005In: Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1462-6004, E-ISSN 1758-7840, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 437-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - To develop and empirically test a framework on how firm size can matter for firm behavior and performance in strategic networks of small and medium-sized enterprises (SME networks). Design/methodology/approach - Empirical study based on statistical analysis of standardized questionnaires and analysis of interview material from face-to-face interviews with managers in a population of 54 firms that operates in SME networks. Findings - Firm size can be an important determinant for firm performance, and for networking inside and outside the SME network. Different networking behaviors are found to have different roles for pursuing corporate entrepreneurship and for gaining performance effects in interaction with corporate entrepreneurship. Originality/value - Prior research has suggested larger firms as valuable for holding firms in SME networks together, but has not put much effort in explaining why and how, and what they gain from doing this. This study advances these suggestions by showing how larger firms can prosper simultaneously as they bind firms together in these networks. Since firm size may determine networking behavior and outcomes in SME networks, the suitability of a larger vs a smaller firm size for SME network participation is discussed

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