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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Gender-based learning dilemmas in organizations2001In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 13, no 7/8, p. 298-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Raises questions about the links between gender and organizational changes, and between gender and learning at work. The empirical base is a qualitative study of organizational changes in the pulp and paper industry, electronics industry, food industry, and laundry industry in Sweden during the late 1990s. In the studied companies, restoration responses in the work organizations brought the organization back its original form and function. Shows that gender exerts an influence on the existing work organization and on the organizational change. The learning organization, with its focus on integration and decentralization, challenges gender order, which is a strong system, built on segregation and hierarchy. Concludes that gender segregating and stereotypic gender-coding of workplaces and work tasks were strong restoring mechanisms and obstacles to strategic organizational changes, and to individual and to organizational learning.

  • 2.
    Berg Jansson, Anna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing and Medical technology.
    Parding, Karolina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    What about learning? A study of temporary agency staffing and learning conditions in Swedish health care2020In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 63-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss conditions for workplace learning (WPL) in relation to temporary agency staffing (TAS), focusing on temporary and regular nurses’ experiences of social relations.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Data were gathered using qualitative semi-structured interviews with five agency nurses and five regular nurses. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data.

    Findings

    Similarities and differences regarding conditions for WPL among “temps” and “regulars” emerged, pointing towards both challenges and opportunities for WPL on various levels. Moreover, although challenges stood out, the context of professional work provides certain opportunities for WPL through, for example, knowledge sharing among nurses.

    Research limitations/implications

    Results are valid for the interviewees’ experiences of WPL conditions. However, the findings may also have currency in other but similar workplaces and employment circumstances.

    Practical implications

    Client organisations and temporary work agencies could benefit from developing management and HR strategies aimed at strengthening the opportunities for WPL, related to professional work, to ensure that these opportunities are leveraged fully.

    Originality/value

    This study adopts a WPL perspective on TAS in the context of professional work, which is still rare.

  • 3.
    Berglund, Leif
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Andersson, Per
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University.
    Recognition of knowledge and skills at work: in whose interests?2012In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 73-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Work-place learning takes place in many settings and in different ways, resulting in knowledge and skills of different kinds. The recognition process in the work place is however often implicit and seldom discussed in terms of recognition of prior learning (RPL). The aim of this paper is to give examples of how the knowledge/skills of employees get recognition in the workplace and to discuss what the consequences of such recognition processes might be. Design/methodology/approach – This paper is based on a study in two companies and two municipalities, where 21 interviews were conducted with human resource managers, team leaders and union representatives. The research questions concerned the ways skills were recognised among employees and how the logics of these actions could be understood. Findings – The findings show that both companies and municipalities have their own ways of assessing knowledge/skills, mostly out of a production logic of what is needed at the workplace. However, certain skills are also made “unvisualised” for the employee. This employer-controlled recognition logic is important to understand when RPL models are brought to the work place in order to obtain win-win situations for both employers and employees. Practical implications – It seems important to identify an already existing system for assessment of knowledge/skills at the workplace when bringing RPL processes to the workplace. Originality/value – The approach to understand assessment processes in these companies and municipalities from an RPL perspective has not been widely covered before.

  • 4. Lindell, Mats
    et al.
    Stenström, Marja-Leena
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Between policy and practice: structuring workplace learning in higher vocational education in Sweden and Finland2005In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 194-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study considers the recently established higher vocational education reforms with Swedish advanced vocational education (AVE) and Finnish polytechnics in terms of organisational structure, the design of workplace learning, and furthermore, what kind of practical implications these new models of learning at work have resulted in.

  • 5. Parding, Karolina
    et al.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Learning gaps in a learning organization: professionals' values versus management values2010In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 292-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to challenge the concept of "the learning organization" as unproblematic and inherently good. Design/methodology/approach: The research looked at how teachers - as an example of public sector professionals in a work organization that claims to be a learning organization - view their conditions for learning. Findings: By using this approach, the normative values surrounding the concept of the learning organization were discussed. This approach identifies power-relations: i.e. who has the priority of interpretation to define what learning is desired and considered relevant as well as when, how and where one learns. In addition, it gives indications to how and why the implementations of management concepts are not always successful. Originality/value: This article shows how the implementation of a governance concept (learning organization) in fact can be seen as bringing with it unintended consequences for the organization as a whole - and especially for the professionals. Even within a work organization claiming to be a learning organization, learning gaps can be identified.

  • 6.
    Parding, Karolina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Berg-Jansson, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Conditions for workplace learning in professional work: Discrepancies between occupational and organisational values2018In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 108-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This paper aims to examine and discuss learning conditions for teachers, in the context of choice and decentralisation reforms.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This article is based on analyses of 30 interviews with Swedish upper secondary teachers focusing on their experiences of their conditions for learning.

    Findings

    This paper shows how teachers at upper secondary level identify their subjects as the most important to learn more within. Secondly, we also show that spatial and temporal aspects of organisation of work seem to influence the conditions for subject learning, where the interviewees in many ways contrast their own view to how they describe their work being organised.

    Research limitations/implications

    Our findings may have currency for other professional groups with similar governance-contexts, and teachers in other similar governance-contexts.

    Practical implications

    These findings indicate the need to further develop workplace learning strategies founded upon the understanding of schools as workplaces, taking occupational values into account. Furthermore, these strategies should be seen as a core Human Resource Management issue, as they can potentially enhance the work environment, thus increasing the profession’s attractiveness.

    Originality/value

    We show that spatial and temporal aspects of organisation of work seem to influence the conditions for the sought after subject learning, and that the teachers and the school management seem to identify with different and clashing ideals in terms of what, when, how and with whom to learn.

  • 7.
    Parding, Karolina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Ek Styvén, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Lindström, Frida
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Näppä, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Workplace learning in transient workplaces: the tourism and hospitality industry in the Arctic region2023In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 35, no 9, p. 259-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on conditions for workplace learning (WPL) in highly transient workplaces, exemplified by the tourism and hospitality sector in the Arctic region. The aim is to analyse and discuss how employees and employers view the conditions for employees’ WPL from their respective perspectives. Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on a qualitative approach. Ten interviews with employers and ten interviews with employees were carried out. This opens for different perspectives, including identifying “learning gaps”. The analysis was thematic, with a focus on opportunities and challenges for WPL in these transient workplace contexts. Findings: Overall, conditions for WPL seem unsatisfactory. On the one hand, both employees and employers see WPL as essential for staff retention. Employers also see WPL as a strategy for business development and, thus, profit. On the other hand, high staff turnover makes it challenging to strategically invest in and organize for WPL, especially formal learning. Hence, a Catch-22 situation emerges. Research limitations/implications: As this study is qualitative in its scope, generalizations are analytical rather than statistical. Originality/value: There is a shortage of studies on conditions for WPL, focusing particularly on transient workplaces. Moreover, by including employer and employee perspectives, the authors contribute to a gap in the literature. The empirical contribution of this paper thus lies in using a theoretical WPL framework on transient workplaces, exemplified by the tourism and hospitality industries in the Arctic region.

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  • 8.
    Sjöberg Forssberg, Karin
    et al.
    Division of Ergonomics, Royal Insititute of Technology (KTH), Huddinge, Sweden.
    Parding, Karolina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Vänje, Annika
    Division of Ergonomics, Royal Insititute of Technology (KTH), Huddinge, Sweden.
    Conditions for workplace learning: a gender divide?2021In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 302-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine and discuss conditions for workplace learning in gender-segregated workplaces in the public sector, how social constructions of gender contribute to (or constrain) the workplace learning conditions within two workplace contexts. Design/methodology/approach: The research was carried out through an interactive approach with data from 12 semi-structured interviews with workers and first-line managers from technical maintenance and home care in a Swedish municipality, validated at an analysis seminar with 27 participations, from both workplace contexts the Swedish Work Environment Authority and us researchers. Findings: The results indicate that gender affects conditions for workplace learning and contributes to an enabling learning environment in the male-dominated workplace context and to a constraining learning environment in the female-dominated workplace context. The identified differences are created in both organisational structures and the organisations’ cultures. Research limitations/implications: When analysing conditions for workplace learning from a gender perspective, the approach of comparative, cross-case analyses is useful. An interactive approach with women and men describing and analysing their work experiences together with researchers is a fruitful way of making gender visible. Practical implications: The theoretical approach in this study illuminates how social constructions of gender operate and affect conditions for workplace learning and contributes to a deeper understanding of underlying causes to unequal conditions in different workplace contexts. Social implications: The findings imply a gender divide which, from the theoretical strands, can be seen as an expression of asymmetrical power relations and where these gendered learning conditions probably also affect the quality of the services. Originality/value: The findings contribute to existing gender theoretical literature by demonstrating that gender is essential to take into consideration when understanding working conditions in different workplace contexts. This study contributes to workplace learning literature by exploring the different ways in which social constructions of gender contribute to enabling and constraining learning environments. © 2020, Emerald Publishing Limited.

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