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  • 1.
    Berg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Barry, Jim
    Chandler, John
    University of New England.
    Academic shape shifting: gender, management and identities in Sweden and England2006In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 275-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article considers gender and managerial identities in organizational life, taking the recent change in higher education in Sweden and England with the coming of the new public management as the context in which to explore these issues. In reviewing the literature on gender identity and organization/management, which has moved from a pre-occupation with difference to an examination of the complex inter-relationship between gender and organization, an attempt is made to operationalize the concept of ositionality, using insights from the work of Alcoff and Melucci. It is argued that Academic Shape Shifting is developed by academics during their time in academia, as well as in defensive and proactive response to the recent managerial reforms. A number of indicative responses to the recent changes are identified. These are: the Stressed Professor, the Managerial Advocate, the Administrative Patrician, the Accidental Female, the Academic Chameleon and the Resolute Researcher. As Academic Shape Shifting is used by social individuals in interaction with others, at particular moments in time and in different circumstances, it is concluded that the implications suggest complexity in the changing character of university life, with female academics in middle range positions facing more difficult compromises than their male counterparts. Key words. academic positioning; gender; higher education; identity; new public management; Sweden and England

  • 2.
    Harlow, Elizabeth
    et al.
    University of Chester.
    Berg, Elisabeth
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Barry, Jim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Chandler, John
    University of East London.
    Neoliberalism, managerialism and the reconfiguring of social work in Sweden and the United Kingdom2013In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 534-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article considers some of the ways in which neoliberalism, through the processes of managerialism, has impacted on the occupation of social work in Sweden and the UK. It is argued that there are similar implications in both countries, through the managerial drive for increased performance in economy, efficiency and effectiveness, but also in the development of evidence based practice. Whilst the key focus of the article is on similarities between these twocountries, differences are also noted. There is also recognition of the way in which resistance to the reconfiguration of social work is taking shape.

  • 3.
    Jensen, Tommy
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Sandström, Johan
    Helin, Sven
    Örebro universitet.
    Corporate codes of ethics and the bending of moral space2009In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 529-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What happens when corporate codes of ethics (CCEs) `go to work', and how do they influence moral practice? Even though previous research has posed these or similar questions, the role and the effect of the CCE are still dubious. In this article, it is argued that this is predominantly because previous research is fixed in a position in which CCEs are passive artefacts with no capability of bending space, and in which agency and morality are limited to the human sphere only. An approach to the study and understanding of CCEs in which the travel of the CCE is made the focus of the research is therefore developed. The code comes alive in a heterogeneous materiality, travelling as a result of a wide range of translations, and granted an epistemological capability of influencing humans' world-views and moral practices. The approach is illustrated with a case study on CCE-implementation and it is concluded that through generating more accounts like this, researchers and practitioners are not only in a better position to understand how CCEs `go to work', but also in a better position to shoulder moral responsibility.

  • 4.
    Sandström, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Jensen, Tommy
    Stockholm University.
    Organizing rocks: Actor-network theory and space2019In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an ethnography of the organizing of an underground mine, this article critically engages with actor–network theory’s theorizing of space, particularly the risk of drifting into spatial pluralism. Inspired by Annemarie Mol’s The Body Multiple, a space multiple approach is enrolled in which seemingly disparate enactments of the mining operations are understood in terms of coexistence and difference, inclusion and exclusion. Such an account attempts to cast aside a kind of neatness that jeopardizes the empirical openness that makes actor–network theory so fruitful to work with in organization studies dealing with spatial complexity. 

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