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  • 1.
    Anokhin, Sergey
    et al.
    Department of Marketing and Entrepreneurship, Kent State University.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    A conceptual framework for misfit technology commercialization2011In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 78, no 6, p. 1060-1071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emerging literature on outbound open innovation has highlighted innovation processes, which presuppose active outward technology transfer to increase firm profits. To contribute to this discourse, our paper goes beyond the emphasis on core-related technologies and knowledge that currently dominates the technology management literature and develops the novel concept of misfit technology. This concept captures technologies that are not aligned with a focal firm's current knowledge base and/or business model, but which may still be of great value to the firm if alternative commercialization options are considered. By developing a framework that acknowledges (1) Sources of misfit technology, (2) Environmental uncertainty, (3) Organizational slack, (4) Industry appropriability regime and (5) Technological complexity, we theorize on how different modes of commercialization relate to misfit technology commercialization success. The paper is conceptual and is presented with the purpose to spawn further research on this important topic, but simultaneously touches upon the issues of utmost relevance to R&D management practice

  • 2.
    Flostrand, Andrew
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Pitt, Leyland
    Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, B.C., Canada.
    Bridson, Shannon
    Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, B.C., Canada.
    The Delphi technique in forecasting: A 42-year bibliographic analysis (1975–2017)2020In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 150, article id 119773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the infancy of the Delphi Technique for collecting and aggregating expert insight, this methodological tool has been discussed, adapted and applied in over 2,600 published scholarly papers to date. This paper mines the major citation indexing services to analyze five dimensions of these data: primary contribution (methodological or applied), field and subfield, length (in pages), year, and journal/conference. Interpreted visual analytics of these five dimensions (both individually and in combination) provide researchers, practitioners and editors with clear insights about whether the Delphi technique is still as prominently used, discussed, and written about in the academic literature as it was twenty years ago and the related trends that might inform predictions of its future use. Among these insights, a simple time series of frequencies of Delphi publications by year immediately shows that academic acceptance of Delphi as a research tool is not only well established, but it has been growing in popularity and range of research domains for two decades predicting unprecedented levels of use in the years to come.

  • 3.
    Grafström, Jonas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Lindman, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Invention, innovation and diffusion in the European wind power sector2016In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 114, p. 179-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an economic analysis of the technology development patterns in the European wind power sector. The three classic Schumpeterian steps of technological development, invention, innovation and diffusion, are brought together to assess the relationship between these. Three econometric approaches are used, a negative binomial regression model for inventions approximated by patent counts, different learning curve model specifications that have been derived from a Cobb-Douglas cost function to address innovation, and a panel data fixed effect regression for the diffusion model. We suggest an integrated perspective of the technological development process where possible interaction effects between the different models are tested. The dataset covers the time period 1991–2008 in the eight core wind power countries in Western Europe. We find evidence of national and international knowledge spillovers in the invention model. The technology learning model results indicate that there exists global learning but also that the world market price of steel has been an important determinant of the development of wind power costs. In line with previous research, the diffusion model results indicate that investment costs have been an important determinant of the development of installed wind power capacity. The results also point towards the importance of natural gas prices and feed-in tariffs as vital factors for wind power diffusion.

  • 4.
    Kohtamäki, Marko
    et al.
    University of Vaasa, School of Management / University of South-Eastern Norway, USN Business School, Vaasa, Finland.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, School of Management / University of South-Eastern Norway, USN Business School, Vaasa, Finland.
    Patel, Pankaj C.
    Villanova School of Business, Villanova University, Villanova, PA, USA.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    The relationship between digitalization and servitization: The role of servitization in capturing the financial potential of digitalization2020In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 151, article id 119804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates the effect of the interaction between digitalization and servitization on the financial performance of manufacturing companies. We challenge the simple linear assumption between digitalization and financial performance with a sample of 131 manufacturing firms and hypothesize a nonlinear U-shaped interaction effect between digitalization and servitization on financial performance. From low to moderate levels of digitalization, the interaction effect between digitalization and high servitization on company financial performance is negative and significant. From moderate to high levels of digitalization, the interplay between digitalization and high servitization becomes positive and significant, improving companies’ financial performance. The results demonstrate the need for an effective interplay between digitalization and servitization, the digital servitization. Without this interplay, a manufacturing company may face the paradox of digitalization. For managers of manufacturing companies, the study provides insights into the complex relationship between digitalization and financial performance, emphasizing the value of servitization in driving financial performance from digitalization. Thus, the study demonstrates how manufacturing companies can become data-driven by advancing servitization.

  • 5.
    Lichtenthaler, Ulrich
    et al.
    WHU—Otto Beisheim School of Management, Technology and Innovation Management.
    Lichtenthaler, Eckhard
    ETH Zurich.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Technology commercialization intelligence: organizational antecedents and performance consequences2009In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 76, no 3, p. 301-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    External technology commercialization, e.g., by means of technology licensing, has recently gained in importance. Despite imperfections in technology markets, out-licensing constitutes a major technology commercialization channel. Although the identification of licensing opportunities represents a significant managerial challenge, prior research has relatively neglected these activities. Therefore, we develop the concept of ‘technology commercialization intelligence' (TCI), which refers to the observation of a firm's environment with particular focus on identifying technology licensing opportunities. Grounded in a dynamic capabilities perspective, we test five hypotheses regarding organizational antecedents and performance consequences of TCI, drawing on data from a survey of 152 companies. The empirical findings provide strong support for the importance of the TCI concept. The findings deepen our understanding of the discrepancies between successful pioneering firms active in technology licensing and many others being less successful. The results have major implications for technology exploitation in open innovation processes.

  • 6.
    Palmié, Maximilian
    et al.
    University of St.Gallen, St.Gallen, Switzerland.
    Wincent, Joakim
    University of St.Gallen/Hanken, School of Economics, Entrepreneurship and Management, St.Gallen/Helsinki, Switzerland/Finland.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, School of Management, Vaasa, Finland.
    Caglar, Umur
    Innovalogy Capital Management, Tampere, Finland.
    The evolution of the financial technology ecosystem: An introduction and agenda for future research on disruptive innovations in ecosystems2020In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 151, article id 119779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At a time when many mature industries have been fundamentally transformed by disruptive innovations, prominent examples such as Apple and Uber reflect how disruptive innovations often originate at the ecosystem or system level rather than in individual firms. Unfortunately, the academic literature has paid little attention to the role of ecosystem development and evolution in relation to disruptive innovations. To overcome this oversight, our study defines disruptive innovation ecosystems and illustrates the impact that the financial technology (FinTech) ecosystem has had on disrupting the financial services industry. We offer an agenda for future research on disruptive innovations and ecosystems and discuss the evolution of the FinTech ecosystem. Our study shows that disruptive innovation ecosystems are not only in need of but also deserving of further attention.

  • 7.
    Söderholm, Patrik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Hellsmark, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology, Environmental Systems Analysis, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Stockholm School of Economics, House of Innovation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hansson, Julia
    Chalmers University of Technology, Maritime Environmental Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden. IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mossberg, Johanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, RISE Bioeconomy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Technological development for sustainability: The role of network management in the innovation policy mix2019In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 138, p. 309-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the key role of actor networks in progressing new sustainable technologies, there is a shortage of conceptual knowledge on how policy can help strengthen collaborative practices in such networks. The objective of this paper is to analyze the roles of such policies – so-called network management – throughout the entire technological development processes. The analysis draws on the public management and sustainability transitions literatures, and discusses how various network characteristics could affect the development of sustainable technologies, including how different categories of network management strategies could be deployed to influence actor collaborations. The paper's main contribution is an analytical framework that addresses the changing roles of network management at the interface between various phases of the technological development process, illustrated with the empirical case of advanced biorefinery technology development in Sweden. Furthermore, the analysis also addresses some challenges that policy makers are likely to encounter when pursuing network management strategies, and identifies a number of negative consequences of ignoring such instruments in the innovation policy mix. The latter include inefficient actor role-taking, the emergence of small, ineffective and competing actor networks in similar technological fields, and a shortage of interpretative knowledge.

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