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  • 1.
    Cantù, Chiara
    et al.
    Department of Economics and Business Management Sciences, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano.
    Ylimäki, Juho
    University of Vaasa , University of Vaasa, Department of Management.
    Sirén, Charlotta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Nickell, David
    Department of Marketing and Real Estate, University of West Georgia, Carrollton.
    The role of knowledge intermediaries in co-managed innovations2015In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 951-961Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to investigate how technological hubs (THs), defined as knowledge intermediaries, can assist companies in creating successful partnerships to develop innovations. Specifically, the authors ask how THs can help firms connect with horizontal networks and how THs can assist firms on finding suppliers and customers from the vertical network with whom to collaborate. By answering these two main questions, the paper sheds light on the important role of THs and its incubators as knowledge intermediaries in innovation co-creation. Design/methodology/approach– The research is founded on a longitudinal case study of an Italian technologic hub, ComoNExT, that aims to improve the competitiveness of its local economy. Specific attention is given to the role of the incubator that was formed as a joint effort in the technology hub. Findings– The authors find that THs can facilitate networking among tenants and among tenants and external actors within the same epistemic network. The TH that the authors studied is characterized by a new business model that is founded on providing value-added services and networking. The TH sustains the networking at different levels: within tenants, with local actors, extra-local and international actors. The authors’ analysis suggest that THs become knowledge intermediaries who allow firms to identify innovation parties and transform them into innovation partners and, thus, outline the shift from outsourced innovation to co-managed innovation. Originality/value– The paper shows how knowledge intermediaries facilitate the intermediation between heterogeneous organizations who are located at different network positions and characterized by relational proximity that is the basis for reaching effective innovation. The research depicts how knowledge intermediaries reinforce the drivers of a co-membership network to co-create innovation to improve the strength of a relationship characterized by a shared vision.

  • 2.
    Diba, Hoda
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Department of Information Systems and Decision Sciences, California State University, Fullerton, CA, United States.
    Vella, J.M.
    Department of Corporate Communication, University of Malta, Msida, Malta.
    Abratt, R.
    Gordon Institute of Business Science, University of Pretoria, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Social media influence on the B2B buying process2019In: Journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aims to explore if and how business-to-business (B2B) companies can use social media to influence the buying process. Design/methodology/approach: The study uses an exploratory approach into the existing literature related to the B2B buying process and its relationship with social media. Findings: The study shows that companies in a B2B context can use social media as a means of influencing the stages of the buying process by means of using one or more of the seven functional blocks of social media. Research limitations/implications: The findings demonstrate the relation that exists between each stage of the buyer process in a B2B organization and the functional blocks of social media. This study opens the door for further research into the influence of each of these blocks on the buying process stages and the roles involved. Practical implications: This study identifies how social media’s blocks influence the different stages and how organizations can use that to their benefit. Originality/value: Few studies have investigated the use of social media in a B2B context. However, not many have looked into the influence of social media in the B2B buying process and buying center. This study looks into the relationship between the buying process stages and social media’s functional blocks as related to the different roles of the buying center.

  • 3.
    Duncan, Sherese Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Chohan, Raeesah
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Ferreira, João José
    Department of Management and Economics and NECE- Research Unit in Business Sciences, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã, Portugal.
    What makes the difference? Employee social media brand engagement2019In: Journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This paper aims to explore, using the employee lens of business-to-business firms, word use through brand engagement and social media interaction to understand the difference between employees who rate their employer brands highly on social media and those who don't.

    Design/methodology/approach

    We conducted a textual content analysis of posts published on the social media job evaluation site glassdoor.com. LIWC software package was used to analyze 30 of the top 200 business-to-business brands listed on Brandwatch using four variables, namely, analytical thinking, clout, authenticity and emotional tone.

    Findings

    The results show that employees who rate their employer’s brand low use significantly more words, are significantly less analytic and write with significantly more clout because they focus more on others than themselves. Employees who rate their employer’s brand highly, write with significantly more authenticity, exhibit a significantly higher tone and display far more positive emotions in their reviews.

    Practical implications

    Brand managers should treat social media data disseminated by individual stakeholders, like the variables used in this study (tone, word count, frequency), as a valuable tool for brand insight on their industry, competition and their own brand equity, now and especially over time.

    Originality/value

    This study provides acknowledgement that social media is a significant source of marketing intelligence that may improve brand equity by better understanding and managing brand engagement.

  • 4.
    Eriksson, Per-Erik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Pesämaa, Ossi
    Department of Entrepreneurship, Management and Organization, Hanken School of Economics, Vasa.
    Buyer-supplier integration in project-based industries2013In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of the study is to propose and test a buyer-supplier integration model, based on clients’ collaborative purchasing practices, in a project-based industry.Design/methodology/approach - A two-stage survey study of client-contractor relationships in the Swedish construction industry was conducted. The survey rounds in 2006 and 2009 obtained 87 and 106 responses respectively. The proposed model was empirically tested using structural equation modeling techniques. Findings - The empirical results support our proposed model: incentive-based payment and partner selection based on multiple criteria enhance buyer-supplier integration, in terms of joint action. Furthermore, incentive-based payment increases the use of partner selection based on multiple criteria.Research limitations/implications - A useful theoretical contribution is that incentive-based payment is an important type of incentive structure that enhances buyer-supplier integration in project contexts.Practical implications - We also found that the occurrence of joint action has been increasing from 2006 to 2009. Especially, incentive-based payment plays a more important role for establishing joint action in 2009 than in 2006. The recent economic downturn and a recently completed training program targeting the survey population may explain some of the unexpected findings.Originality/value - The paper addresses an identified gap in the relationship marketing literature, that is, the lack of quantitative studies of relationship marketing aspects in project-based industries.

  • 5.
    Foster, Tim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Creating Digital Value: At the Heart of the I-E-I Framework2005In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 20, no 4/5, p. 245-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to provide a better understanding on the use of web sites for creating value in industrial buyer-seller relationships. Design/methodology/approach - Through an extensive yet not exhaustive review of previous studies on business-to-business (B2B) web site development the extranet level of a conceptual model (the I-E-l framework) is tested in an industrial setting in Sweden. Using four research questions as a guide, a qualitative, case study approach is followed in order to uncover both the industrial sellers' and buyers' perspectives on the true value of an industrial extranet. Findings - The findings show that for true value to be created at this level, both the seller and the buyer must not only take value out but also put it in. Value in this setting focuses on information as the heart of true value creation, and the view that the extranet can indeed be considered the "super- glue" of such seller-buyer relationships. Research limitations/implications - Although the aim of qualitative research is rarely to generalize in any way, it does allow one to probe more deeply and uncover detailed clues and descriptions of what is happening in an area of research that is itself dynamic and constantly changing. What practitioners can take from this study is that extranets can be developed to serve and create true value at the (core) seller-buyer relationship. Originality/value - Empirical evidence regarding extranets in such settings has been limited, this study helps to fill this gap and provide a foundation for future research efforts within the area.

  • 6.
    Huikkola, Tuomas
    et al.
    Department of Management, University of Vaasa.
    Kohtamäki, Marko
    Department of Management, University of Vaasa.
    Solution providers’ strategic capabilities2017In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 752-770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Drawing on the resource-based view of the firm, this study aims to analyze solution providers’ strategic capabilities that facilitate above-average returns.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The study applies a qualitative comparative case method. In addition to an extensive set of secondary data, the results are based on interviews with 35 executives from nine leading industrial solution providers, their strategic customers and suppliers. The analyzed solution providers were identified based on quantitative survey data.

    Findings

    By observing six distinctive resources and three strategic business processes, the present study identifies seven strategic capabilities that occur in different phases of solution development and deployment: fleet management capability, technology-development capability, mergers and acquisitions capability, value quantifying capability, project management capability, supplier network management capability and value co-creation capability.

    Research limitations/implications

    The study develops a generic model for the strategic capabilities of servitization. Application of the developed model to different contexts would further validate and enhance it.

    Practical implications

    Managers can use the developed model to benchmark, identify, build and manage solution providers’ strategic capabilities and associated practices.

    Originality/value

    The study develops a valuable conceptual model based on the comparative case data. Case firms were selected for the study based on a representative quantitative data set. The results were verified and triangulated with external data.

  • 7.
    Kohtamäki, Marko
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Thorgren, Sara
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Organizational identity and behaviors in strategic networks2016In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 36-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of this study is to develop and test a framework describing the interplay between collective organizational identity, network behaviors and performance in strategic networks. Design/methodology/approach– The study uses data from 141 firms that participated in strategic networks. Structural equation modeling is used to test the hypotheses. Findings– This study demonstrates how a firm’s collective organizational identity directs managerial perceptions toward partner’s opportunism in strategic networks; how these views shape interactions with network partners; and how these interactions facilitate firm adaptations within strategic networks. Moreover, it demonstrates how network adaptations affect the satisfaction with strategic network performance and how this ultimately loops back to influence organizational identity. Research limitations/implications– Given the limits of quantitative research to capture the mechanisms driving network collaborations, further case-based research on the role of organizational identity for network behaviors is needed. Practical implications– The results highlight the importance of collective organizational identity for network behaviors and positive performance outcomes. Firms that intend to engage in strategic networks should develop a collective organizational identity that supports implementing the network strategy. The results emphasize the importance of developing a collective organizational identity.

  • 8.
    Kumar, Rajesh
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    A conceptual framework for the development of a service delivery strategy for industrial systems and products2004In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 310-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service and product support are increasingly critical elements in the achievement of customer satisfaction and winning new markets. The success of a product support strategy depends on how effectively these services are delivered. The focus of this paper is on performance enhancement through the use of service delivery strategies; critical factors in the marketing of product support and service-related contracts that in turn, foster customer satisfaction, based on industrial systems in a multinational environment Considered in the framework are product design characteristics such as reliability, maintainability, customer's organizational culture and geographical location, for functional as well as conventional products. The paper advocates an increased focus on support to customers within the framework, introduces a modified service gap model and suggests an approach that reduces any gap between expected and required services. An evaluation of service delivery performance is emphasized.

  • 9.
    Morgan, Todd
    et al.
    Kent State University, Kent, OH.
    Anokhin, Sergey
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Entrepreneurial Orientation, Firm Market Power and Opportunism in Networks2016In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 99-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– This study aims to examine the impact of entrepreneurial orientation, firm market power and their interaction on opportunism in horizontal exchange networks. The aim is to investigate how entrepreneurial orientation and market power individually can lead to opportunism, but possessing both characteristics will mitigate such behavior. Design/methodology/approach– Based on an analysis of 108 firms in 25 networks using a panel-corrected standard errors approach, the study tests hypotheses regarding how entrepreneurial orientation, firm market power and their interaction impact opportunism within a focal horizontal network. Findings– The results of the analysis show that entrepreneurial orientation and firm market power are both positively related to network opportunism, but when firms possess both characteristics, opportunism toward fellow network actors is mitigated. Research limitations/implications– Research on entrepreneurial orientation has primarily examined the positive outcomes of the strategic orientation. Firm power has been studied as an antecedent of opportunism and governance mechanisms. This study examines the joint impact of the two and brings new insight to the research streams. Practical implications– Horizontal networks are conduits for resource and knowledge exchange, yet managers need to be concerned about how firms seek competitive advantage. Our framework suggests that managers should be concerned about dealing with network actors with an entrepreneurial orientation philosophy or high market power, but when firms possess both, they are deemed safer partners. Originality/value– The manuscript extends research on entrepreneurial orientation, firm power and horizontal networks. While both entrepreneurial orientation and power may impede networking relationships, this paper shows that firms that possess both may be the best relational partners.

  • 10.
    Partanen, Jukka
    et al.
    Vaasan Yliopisto Helsinki.
    Kohtamäki, Marko
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. University of Vaasa .
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Developing and validating a multi-dimensional scale for operationalizing industrial service offering2017In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 295-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    urpose

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a new scale for measuring the scope (i.e., breadth and depth) of industrial service offering.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The scale and its constructs are developed by (1) combining the key insights from prior literature and practitioners gained through expert interviews; (2) validating the constructs by three item-construct validation rounds with nine academic experts; and (3) by testing and further revising the scale, with a sample of 91 manufacturing firms.

    Findings

    The distinct contribution of the study is the construction and validation of a new multi-dimensional scale for operationalizing the scope of industrial service offering. In addition, the identified service categories (i.e., pre-sales services, product support services, product life-cycle services, R&D services, and operational services) extend the current literature on service typologies

    Research limitations/implications

    The data is somewhat biased towards small and medium-sized industrial firms. Hence, the development of the measurement in the context of large industrial firms provides one fruitful avenue for further research.

    Practical implications

    For managers of industrial firms, the identified service categories provide novel insight on how to develop, bundle and commercialize industrial services to their varying customer segments.

    Originality/value

    This study develops a multi-dimensional, fine-grained, statistical and relationship-level scale for measuring the scope of industrial service business. Moreover, this study tests and further develops the scale with quantitative empirical data.

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