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  • 1.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Floren, Henrik
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Beyond managing uncertainty: insights from studying equivocality in the fuzzy front end of product and process innovation projects2011In: IEEE transactions on engineering management, ISSN 0018-9391, E-ISSN 1558-0040, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 551-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown uncertainty reduction to be critical in the fuzzy front end of the innovation process, but little attention has been given to the equally important concept of equivocality, although it is a defining characteristic of many front-end projects. To address this research gap, this paper report the results from a longitudinal, multiple case study of four large companies oriented to both product and process innovation. First, our results show that both uncertainty and equivocality is more effectively reduced in successful front-end projects than in unsuccessful ones. Second, the negative consequences of equivocality appear more critical to front-end performance than the consequences following uncertainty. Third, our results show that uncertainty and equivocality are reduced sequentially in successful projects and simultaneously in unsuccessful projects. Finally, uncertainty and equivocality takes longer time to reduce in process innovation projects than in product innovation projects, which is a consequence of the systemic nature of process innovation. Altogether, these findings provide strong implications for managing front-end projects more proficiently.

  • 2.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Kurkkio, Monika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Lichtenthaler, Ulrich
    University of Mannheim.
    Antecedents and consequences of firms' process innovation capability: a literature review and a conceptual framework2012In: IEEE transactions on engineering management, ISSN 0018-9391, E-ISSN 1558-0040, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 519-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process innovation can allow both efficiency and effectiveness gains and is a key source of long-term competitive advantage in manufacturing firms. However, the literature on managing process innovation is broad and fragmented, and it has not yet been systematically reviewed in the scholarly literature. Drawing on a capability-based perspective, the aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the process innovation literature. We synthesize our findings into a conceptual framework displaying the antecedents and consequences of firms' process innovation capability. First, a parsimonious review of the process innovation literature is conducted. Second, a conceptual framework of firms' process innovation capability is developed to synthesize the literature and to advance knowledge about managing process innovation. A principal distinction between a firm's potential and realized process innovation capability is drawn, and it is argued that high-quality realization mechanisms are critical for achieving desired process innovation outcomes. Finally, implications for theory, management practice, and recommendations for future research are provided.

  • 3.
    Parraguez, Pedro
    et al.
    DTU Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Piccolo, Sebastiano A.
    DTU Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Perišić, Marija Majda
    Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Štorga, Mario
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology. Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Maier, Anja M.
    DTU Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Process Modularity Over Time: Modeling Process Execution as an Evolving Activity Network2019In: IEEE transactions on engineering management, ISSN 0018-9391, E-ISSN 1558-0040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process modularity describes the extent to which processes can be decomposed into modules to be executed in parallel. So far, research has approached process modularity from a static perspective, not accounting for its temporal evolution. As a result, the understanding of process modularity has been limited to inferences drawn from aggregated analyses that disregard process execution. This article introduces and develops the notion of dynamic process modularity considering the evolving activity network structure as executed by people. Drawing on network science, the article quantifies process modularity over time using archival data from an engineering design process of a biomass power plant. This article shows how studying the temporal evolution of process modularity enables a more complete understanding of activity networks, facilitates the comparison of actual process modularity patterns against formal engineering design stages, and provides data-driven decision-support for process planning and interventions. Finally, managerial recommendations for interface management, resource allocation, and process decomposition are proposed, to help practitioners better to understand and manage dynamic processes.

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