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  • 1.
    Schulte, Stefanie
    et al.
    Institute of Motor Control and Movement Technique, German Sport University Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Schiffer, Thorsten
    Institute of Motor Control and Movement Technique, German Sport University Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Sperlich, Billy
    Institute of Training Science and Sport Informatics, German Sport University Cologne, Germany.
    Kleinöder, Heinz
    Institute of Training Science and Sport Informatics, German Sport University Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Holmberg, Hans-Christer
    Mittuniversitetet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap.
    Serum Concentrations of S100B are not Affected by Cycling to Exhaustion With or Without Vibration2011In: Journal of Human Kinetics, ISSN 1640-5544, E-ISSN 1899-7562, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 67-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The calcium-binding protein S100B is produced primarily by astrocytes and exerts concentration-dependentparacrine and autocrine effects on neurons and glia. The numerous findings of a correlation between S100B andtraumatic brain injury (TBI) have resulted in the employment of this protein as a clinical biomarker for such injury.Our present aim was to determine whether cycling with (V) or without (NV) vibration alters serum concentrations ofS100B. Twelve healthy, male non-smokers (age: 25.3±1.6 yrs, body mass: 74.2±5.9 kg, body height: 181.0±3.7 cm,VO2peak: 56.9±5.1 ml·min-1·kg-1(means ± SD)) completed in random order two separate trials to exhaustion on avibrating bicycle (amplitude 4 mm and frequency 20 Hz) connected to an ergometer. The initial workload of 100 W waselevated by 50 W every 5 min and the mean maximal period of exercise was 25:27±1:30 min. The S100B in venousblood taken at rest, immediately after the test, and 30, 60 and 240 min post-exercise exhibited no significant differences(p>0.05), suggesting that cycling with and without vibration does not influence this parameter.

  • 2.
    Zinner, C.
    et al.
    Department of Sport, University of Applied Sciences for Police and Administration of Hesse, Wiesbaden, Germany.
    Matzka, M.
    Integrative and Experimental Exercise Science and Training, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.
    Krumscheid, S.
    Department of Mathematics RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.
    Holmberg, Hans-Christer
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Sperlich, B.
    Integrative and Experimental Exercise Science and Training, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.
    Cardiorespiratory, Metabolic and Perceived Responses to Electrical Stimulation of Upper-Body Muscles while Performing Arm Cycling2021In: Journal of Human Kinetics, ISSN 1640-5544, E-ISSN 1899-7562, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was designed to assess systemic cardio-respiratory, metabolic and perceived responses to incremental arm cycling with concurrent electrical myostimulation (EMS). Eleven participants (24 ± 3 yrs; 182 ± 10 cm; 86 ± 16.8 kg) performed two incremental tests involving arm cycling until volitional exhaustion was reached with and without EMS of upper-body muscles. The peak power output was 10.1% lower during arm cycling with (128 ± 30 W) than without EMS (141 ± 25 W, p = 0.01; d = 0.47). In addition, the heart rate (2-9%), oxygen uptake (7-15%), blood lactate concentration (8-46%) and ratings of perceived exertion (4-14%) while performing submaximal arm cycling with EMS were all higher with than without EMS (all p < 0.05). Upon exhaustion, the heart rate, oxygen uptake, lactate concentration, and ratings of perceived exertion did not differ between the two conditions (all p > 0.05). In conclusion, arm cycling with EMS induced more pronounced cardio-respiratory, metabolic and perceived responses, especially during submaximal arm cycling. This form of exercise with stimulation might be beneficial for a variety of athletes competing in sports involving considerable generation of work by the upper body (e.g., kayaking, cross-country skiing, swimming, rowing and various parasports). 

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