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  • 1.
    Alvi, Sajid
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Jarzabek, Dariusz M.
    Department of Mechanics of Materials (ZMM), Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-106 Warsaw, Poland.
    Gilzad Kohan, Mojtaba
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Hedman, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Jenczyk, Piotr
    Department of Mechanics of Materials (ZMM), Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-106 Warsaw, Poland.
    Natile, Marta Maria
    CNR—Institute of Condensed Matter Chemistry and Technologies for Energy (ICMATE), I-16149 Genoa, Italy. Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Padova, 35131 Padova, Italy.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Akhtar, Farid
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Synthesis and Mechanical Characterization of a CuMoTaWV High-Entropy Film by Magnetron Sputtering2020In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 12, no 18, p. 21070-21079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of high-entropy alloy (HEA) films is a promising and cost-effective way to incorporate these materials of superior properties in harsh environments. In this work, a refractory high-entropy alloy (RHEA) film of equimolar CuMoTaWV was deposited on silicon and 304 stainless-steel substrates using DC-magnetron sputtering. A sputtering target was developed by partial sintering of an equimolar powder mixture of Cu, Mo, Ta, W, and V using spark plasma sintering. The target was used to sputter a nanocrystalline RHEA film with a thickness of ∼900 nm and an average grain size of 18 nm. X-ray diffraction of the film revealed a body-centered cubic solid solution with preferred orientation in the (110) directional plane. The nanocrystalline nature of the RHEA film resulted in a hardness of 19 ± 2.3 GPa and an elastic modulus of 259 ± 19.2 GPa. A high compressive strength of 10 ± 0.8 GPa was obtained in nanopillar compression due to solid solution hardening and grain boundary strengthening. The adhesion between the RHEA film and 304 stainless-steel substrates was increased on annealing. For the wear test against the E52100 alloy steel (Grade 25, 700–880 HV) at 1 N load, the RHEA film showed an average coefficient of friction (COF) and wear rate of 0.25 (RT) and 1.5 (300 °C), and 6.4 × 10–6 mm3/N m (RT) and 2.5 × 10–5 mm3/N m (300 °C), respectively. The COF was found to be 2 times lower at RT and wear rate 102 times lower at RT and 300 °C than those of 304 stainless steel. This study may lead to the processing of high-entropy alloy films for large-scale industrial applications.

  • 2.
    An, Rong
    et al.
    Herbert Gleiter Institute of Nanoscience, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, China.
    Zheng, Hangbing
    Herbert Gleiter Institute of Nanoscience, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, China.
    Dong, Yihui
    Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.
    Liu, Chang
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, China.
    Zou, Luyu
    Herbert Gleiter Institute of Nanoscience, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, China.
    Feng, Tao
    Herbert Gleiter Institute of Nanoscience, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, China.
    Laaksonen, Aatto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, China; Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, Sweden; Centre of Advanced Research in Bionanoconjugates and Biopolymers, Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A, Romania; Department of Chemical and Geological Sciences, University of Cagliari, Campus Monserrato ,SS 554 Bivio per Sestu, Monserrato, Italy.
    Ji, Xiaoyan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Ti-Si-Zr-Zn Nanometallic Glass Substrate with a Tunable Zinc Composition for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Cytochrome c2023In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 15, no 21, p. 25275-25284Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Berglund, Linn
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Nissilä, Tuukka
    Fiber and Particle Engineering Research Unit, University of Oulu, FI 90570 Oulu, Finland.
    Sivaraman, Deeptanshu
    Empa—Building Energy Materials and Components, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, CH 8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland.
    Komulainen, Sanna
    NMR Research Unit, University of Oulu, FI 90570 Oulu, Finland.
    Telkki, Ville-Veikko
    NMR Research Unit, University of Oulu, FI 90570 Oulu, Finland.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8, Canada.
    Seaweed-Derived Alginate–Cellulose Nanofiber Aerogel for Insulation Applications2021In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 13, no 29, p. 34899-34909Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The next generation of green insulation materials is being developed to provide safer and more sustainable alternatives to conventional materials. Bio-based cellulose nanofiber (CNF) aerogels offer excellent thermal insulation properties; however, their high flammability restricts their application. In this study, the design concept for the development of a multifunctional and non-toxic insulation material is inspired by the natural composition of seaweed, comprising both alginate and cellulose. The approach includes three steps: first, CNFs were separated from alginate-rich seaweed to obtain a resource-efficient, fully bio-based, and inherently flame-retardant material; second, ice-templating, followed by freeze-drying, was employed to form an anisotropic aerogel for effective insulation; and finally, a simple crosslinking approach was applied to improve the flame-retardant behavior and stability. At a density of 0.015 g cm–3, the lightweight anisotropic aerogels displayed favorable mechanical properties, including a compressive modulus of 370 kPa, high thermal stability, low thermal conductivity (31.5 mW m–1 K–1), considerable flame retardancy (0.053 mm s–1), and self-extinguishing behavior, where the inherent characteristics were considerably improved by crosslinking. Different concentrations of the crosslinker altered the mechanical properties, while the anisotropic structure influenced the mechanical properties, combustion velocity, and to some extent thermal conductivity. Seaweed-derived aerogels possess intrinsic characteristics that could serve as a template for the future development of sustainable high-performance insulation materials. 

  • 4.
    Bulota, Mindaugas
    et al.
    Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, School of Materials, University of Manchester.
    Hughes, Mark R.
    Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University.
    Eichhorn, Stephen J.
    College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter.
    Micromechanics of TEMPO-oxidized fibrillated cellulose composites2012In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 331-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composites of poly(lactic) acid (PLA) reinforced with TEMPO-oxidized fibrillated cellulose (TOFC) were prepared to 15, 20, 25, and 30% fiber weight fractions. To aid dispersion and to improve stress transfer, we acetylated the TOFC prior to the fabrication of TOFC-PLA composite films. Raman spectroscopy was employed to study the deformation micromechanics in these systems. Microtensile specimens were prepared from the films and deformed in tension with Raman spectra being collected simultaneously during deformation. A shift in a Raman peak initially located at ∼1095 cm -1, assigned to C-O-C stretching of the cellulose backbone, was observed upon deformation, indicating stress transfer from the matrix to the TOFC reinforcement. The highest band shift rate, with respect to strain, was observed in composites having a 30% weight fraction of TOFC. These composites also displayed a significantly higher strain to failure compared to pure acetylated TOFC film, and to the composites having lower weight fractions of TOFC. The stress-transfer processes that occur in microfibrillated cellulose composites are discussed with reference to the micromechanical data presented. It is shown that these TOFC-based composite materials are progressively dominated by the mechanics of the networks, and a shear-lag type stress transfer between fibers.

  • 5.
    Cailotto, Simone
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Via Torino 155, 30172 Venezia Mestre, Italy.
    Mazzaro, Raffaello
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Enrichi, Francesco
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “Enrico Fermi”, Piazza del Viminale 1, 00184 Roma, Italy.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Selva, Maurizio
    Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Via Torino 155, 30172 Venezia Mestre, Italy.
    Cattaruzza, Elti
    Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Via Torino 155, 30172 Venezia Mestre, Italy.
    Cristofori, Davide
    Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Via Torino 155, 30172 Venezia Mestre, Italy;Centro di microscopia elettronica “G. Stevanato”, Via Torino 155b, 30172 Venezia-Mestre, Italy.
    Amadio, Emanuele
    Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Via Torino 155, 30172 Venezia Mestre, Italy.
    Perosa, Alvise
    Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Via Torino 155, 30172 Venezia Mestre, Italy.
    Design of Carbon Dots for Metal-free Photoredox Catalysis2018In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 47, p. 40560-40567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The photoreduction potential of a set of four different carbon dots (CDs) was investigated. The CDs were synthesized by using two different preparation methods—hydrothermal and pyrolytic—and two sets of reagents—neat citric acid and citric acid doped with diethylenetriamine. The hydrothermal syntheses yielded amorphous CDs, which were either nondoped (a-CDs) or nitrogen-doped (a-N-CDs), whereas the pyrolytic treatment afforded graphitic CDs, either non-doped (g-CDs) or nitrogen-doped (g-N-CDs). The morphology, structure, and optical properties of four different types of CDs revealed significant differences depending on the synthetic pathway. The photocatalytic activities of the CDs were investigated as such, that is, in the absence of any other redox mediators, on the model photoreduction reaction of methyl viologen. The observed photocatalytic reaction rates: a-N-CDs ≥ g-CDs > a-CDs ≥ g-N-CDs were correlated with the presence/absence of fluorophores, to the graphitic core, and to quenching interactions between the two. The results indicate that nitrogen doping reverses the photoredox reactivity between amorphous and graphitic CDs and that amorphous N-doped CDs are the most photoredox active, a yet unknown fact that demonstrates the tunable potential of CDs for ad hoc applications.

  • 6.
    Chen, Guangyan
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.
    Jin, Bao
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.
    Zhang, Zhehao
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.
    Zhao, Jun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Li, Yunze
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.
    He, Yongyong
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.
    Luo, Jianbin
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.
    Engineering Active-Site-Induced Homogeneous Growth of Polydopamine Nanocontainers on Loading-Enhanced Ultrathin Graphene for Smart Self-Healing Anticorrosion Coatings2023In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 15, no 19, p. 23679-23689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering nanocontainers with encapsulated inhibitors onto graphene has been an emerging technology for developing self-healing anticorrosion coatings. However, the loading contents of inhibitors are commonly limited by inhomogeneous nanostructures of graphene platforms. Here, we propose an activation-induced ultrathin graphene platform (UG-BP) with the homogeneous growth of polydopamine (PDA) nanocontainers encapsulated with benzotriazole (BTA). Ultrathin graphene prepared by catalytic exfoliation and etching activation provides an ideal platform with an ultrahigh specific surface area (1646.8 m2/g) and homogeneous active sites for the growth of PDA nanocontainers, which achieves a high loading content of inhibitors (40 wt %). The obtained UG-BP platform exhibits pH-sensitive corrosion inhibition effects due to its charged groups. The epoxy/UG-BP coating possesses integrated properties of enhanced mechanical properties (>94%), efficient pH-sensitive self-healing behaviors (98.5% healing efficiency over 7 days), and excellent anticorrosion performance (4.21 × 109 Ω·cm2 over 60 days), which stands out from previous related works. Moreover, the interfacial anticorrosion mechanism of UG-BP is revealed in detail, which can inhibit the oxidation of Fe2+ and promote the passivation of corrosion products by a dehydration process. This work provides a universal activation-induced strategy for developing loading-enhanced and tailor-made graphene platforms in extended smart systems and demonstrates a promising smart self-healing coating for advanced anticorrosion applications.

  • 7.
    De Melo, C.
    et al.
    Université de Lorraine, CNRS, IJL, Nancy, France; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany.
    Jullien, M.
    Université de Lorraine, CNRS, IJL, Nancy, France.
    Ghanbaja, J.
    Université de Lorraine, CNRS, IJL, Nancy, France.
    Montaigne, F.
    Université de Lorraine, CNRS, IJL, Nancy, France.
    Pierson, J.-F.
    Université de Lorraine, CNRS, IJL, Nancy, France.
    Soldera, F.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany.
    Rigoni, Federica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Almqvist, Nils
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Mücklich, F.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany.
    Horwat, D.
    Université de Lorraine, CNRS, IJL, Nancy, France.
    Local Structure and Point-Defect-Dependent Area-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition Approach for Facile Synthesis of p-Cu2O/n-ZnO Segmented Nanojunctions2018In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 43, p. 37671-37678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Area-selective atomic layer deposition (AS-ALD) has attracted much attention in recent years due to the possibility of achieving accurate patterns in nanoscale features, which render this technique compatible with the continuous downscaling in nanoelectronic devices. The growth selectivity is achieved by starting from different materials and results (ideally) in localized growth of a single material. We propose here a new concept, more subtle and general, in which a property of the substrate is modulated to achieve localized growth of different materials. This concept is demonstrated by selective growth of high-quality metallic Cu and semiconducting Cu2O thin films, achieved by changing the type of majority point defects in the ZnO underneath film exposed to the reactive species using a patterned bilayer structure composed of highly conductive and highly resistive areas, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The selective growth of these materials in a patterned ZnO/Al-doped ZnO substrate allows the fabrication of p-Cu2O/n-ZnO nanojunctions showing a nonlinear rectifying behavior typical of a p-n junction, as confirmed by conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). This process expands the spectra of materials that can be grown in a selective manner by ALD and opens up the possibility of fabricating different architectures, taking advantage of the area-selective deposition. This offers a variety of opportunities in the field of transparent electronics, catalysis, and photovoltaics.

  • 8.
    de Melo, Claudia
    et al.
    Université de Lorraine, CNRS, IJL, F-54000 Nancy, France; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany.
    Jullien, Maud
    Université de Lorraine, CNRS, IJL, Nancy, France.
    Battie, Yann
    LCP-A2MC, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, Metz, France.
    En Naciri, Aotmane
    LCP-A2MC, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, Metz, France.
    Ghanbaja, Jaafar
    Université de Lorraine, CNRS, IJL, Nancy, France.
    Montaigne, François
    Université de Lorraine, CNRS, IJL, Nancy, France.
    Pierson, Jean-François
    Université de Lorraine, CNRS, IJL, Nancy, France.
    Rigoni, Federica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Almqvist, Nils
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Migot, Sylvie
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, D-66123 Saarbrücken, Germany.
    Mücklich, Frank
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany.
    Horwat, David
    Université de Lorraine, CNRS, IJL, Nancy, France.
    Tunable Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance and Broadband Visible Photoresponse of Cu Nanoparticles/ZnO Surfaces2018In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 47, p. 40958-40965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasmonic Cu nanoparticles (NP) were successfully deposited on ZnO substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) owing to the Volmer–Weber island growth mode. An evolution from Cu NP to continuous Cu films was observed with an increasing number of ALD cycles. Real and imaginary parts of the NP dielectric functions, determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry using an effective medium approach, evidence a localized surface plasmon resonance that can be tuned between the visible and near-infrared ranges by controlling the interparticle spacing and size of the NP. The resulting Cu NP/ZnO device shows an enhanced photoresponse under white light illumination with good responsivity values, fast response times, and stability under dark/light cycles. The significant photocurrent detected for this device is related to the hot-electron generation at the NP surface and injection into the conduction band of ZnO. The possibility of tuning the plasmon resonance together with the photoresponsivity of the device is promising in many applications related to photodetection, photonics, and photovoltaics.

  • 9.
    Dong, Yihui
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel.
    Gong, Mian
    Herbert Gleiter Institute of Nanoscience, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, P. R. China.
    Shah, Faiz Ullah
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Laaksonen, Aatto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, Stockholm SE-10691, Sweden; Center of Advanced Research in Bionanoconjugates and Biopolymers, ‘‘Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Iasi 700469, Romania; State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816, China.
    An, Rong
    Herbert Gleiter Institute of Nanoscience, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, P. R. China.
    Ji, Xiaoyan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Phosphonium-Based Ionic Liquid Significantly Enhances SERS of Cytochrome c on TiO2 Nanotube Arrays2022In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 14, no 23, p. 27456-27465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an attractive technique for studying trace detection. It is of utmost importance to further improve the performance and understand the underlying mechanisms. An ionic liquid (IL), the anion of which is derived from biomass, [P6,6,6,14][FuA] was synthesized and used as a trace additive to improve the SERS performance of cytochrome c (Cyt c) on TiO2 nanotube arrays (TNAs). An increased and better enhancement factor (EF) by four to five times as compared to the system without an IL was obtained, which is better than that from using the choline-based amino acid IL previously reported by us. Dissociation of the ILs improved the ionic conductivity of the system, and the long hydrophobic tails of the [P6,6,6,14]+ cation contributed to a strong electrostatic interaction between Cyt c and the TNA surface, thereby enhancing the SERS performance. Atomic force microscopy did verify strong electrostatic interactions between the Cyt c molecules and TNAs after the addition of the IL. This work demonstrates the importance of introducing the phosphonium-based IL to enhance the SERS performance, which will stimulate further development of more effective ILs on SERS detection and other relevant applications in biology.

  • 10.
    Geng, Shiyu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Wei, Jiayuan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Jonasson, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Fibre and Particle Engineering, University of Oulu. Mechanical & Industrial Engineering (MIE), University of Toronto.
    Multifunctional Carbon Aerogels with Hierarchical Anisotropic Structure Derived from Lignin and Cellulose Nanofibers for CO2 Capture and Energy Storage2020In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 7432-7441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In current times, CO2 capture and light-weight energy storage are receiving significant attention and will be vital functions in next-generation materials. Porous carbonaceous materials have great potential in these areas, whereas most of the developed carbon materials still have significant limitations, such as non-renewable resources, complex and costly processing or the absence of tailorable structure. In this study, a new strategy is developed for using the currently under-utilized lignin and cellulose nanofibers, which can be extracted from renewable resources to produce high-performance multifunctional carbon aerogels with a tailorable, anisotropic pore structure. Both the macro- and microstructure of the carbon aerogels can be simultaneously controlled by discreetly tuning the weight ratio of lignin to cellulose nanofibers in the carbon aerogel precursors, which considerably influences their final porosity and surface area. The designed carbon aerogels demonstrate excellent performance in both CO2 capture and capacitive energy storage, and the best results exhibit a CO2 adsorption capacity of 5.23 mmol g-1 at 273 K and 100 kPa, and a specific electrical double layer capacitance of 124 F g-1 at a current density of 0.2 A g-1, indicating that they have great future potential in the relevant applications.

  • 11.
    Ghamgosar, Pedram
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Rigoni, Federica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Gilzad Kohan, Mojtaba
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    You, Shujie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Morales, Edgar Abarca
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Mazzaro, Raffaello
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Morandi, Vittorio
    Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems Section of Bologna , National Research Council , Bologna , Italy..
    Almqvist, Nils
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Concina, Isabella
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Self-Powered Photodetectors Based on Core-Shell ZnO-Co3O4 Nanowire Heterojunctions2019In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 11, no 26, p. 23454-23462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-powered photodetectors operating in the UV–visible–NIR window made of environmentally friendly, earth abundant, and cheap materials are appealing systems to exploit natural solar radiation without external power sources. In this study, we propose a new p–n junction nanostructure, based on a ZnO–Co3O4 core–shell nanowire (NW) system, with a suitable electronic band structure and improved light absorption, charge transport, and charge collection, to build an efficient UV–visible–NIR p–n heterojunction photodetector. Ultrathin Co3O4 films (in the range 1–15 nm) were sputter-deposited on hydrothermally grown ZnO NW arrays. The effect of a thin layer of the Al2O3 buffer layer between ZnO and Co3O4 was investigated, which may inhibit charge recombination, boosting device performance. The photoresponse of the ZnO–Al2O3–Co3O4 system at zero bias is 6 times higher compared to that of ZnO–Co3O4. The responsivity (R) and specific detectivity (D*) of the best device were 21.80 mA W–1and 4.12 × 1012 Jones, respectively. These results suggest a novel p–n junction structure to develop all-oxide UV–vis photodetectors based on stable, nontoxic, low-cost materials.

  • 12.
    Hall, Colin J.
    et al.
    Ian Wark Research Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes 5095, SA, Australia.
    Ponnusamy, Thirunavukkarasu
    Ian Wark Research Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes 5095, SA, Australia.
    Murphy, Peter J.
    Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes 5095, SA, Australia.
    Lindberg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Antzutkin, Oleg
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering. Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, United Kingdom.
    Griesser, Hans J.
    Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes 5095, SA, Australia.
    A solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance study of post-plasma reactions in organosilicone microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) coatings2014In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 6, no 11, p. 8353-8362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasma-polymerized organosilicone coatings can be used to impart abrasion resistance and barrier properties to plastic substrates such as polycarbonate. Coating rates suitable for industrial-scale deposition, up to 100 nm/s, can be achieved through the use of microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), with optimal process vapors such as tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO) and oxygen. However, it has been found that under certain deposition conditions, such coatings are subject to post-plasma changes; crazing or cracking can occur anytime from days to months after deposition. To understand the cause of the crazing and its dependence on processing plasma parameters, the effects of post-plasma reactions on the chemical bonding structure of coatings deposited with varying TMDSO-to-O2 ratios was studied with 29Si and 13C solid-state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) using both single-pulse and cross-polarization techniques. The coatings showed complex chemical compositions significantly altered from the parent monomer. 29Si MAS NMR spectra revealed four main groups of resonance lines, which correspond to four siloxane moieties (i.e., mono (M), di (D), tri (T), and quaternary (Q)) and how they are bound to oxygen. Quantitative measurements showed that the ratio of TMDSO to oxygen could shift the chemical structure of the coating from 39% to 55% in Q-type bonds and from 28% to 16% for D-type bonds. Post-plasma reactions were found to produce changes in relative intensities of 29Si resonance lines. The NMR data were complemented by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Together, these techniques have shown that the bonding environment of Si is drastically altered by varying the TMDSO-to-O2 ratio during PECVD, and that post-plasma reactions increase the cross-link density of the silicon-oxygen network. It appears that Si-H and Si-OH chemical groups are the most susceptible to post-plasma reactions. Coatings produced at a low TMDSO-to-oxygen ratio had little to no singly substituted moieties, displayed a highly cross-linked structure, and showed less post-plasma reactions. However, these chemically more stable coatings are less compatible mechanically with plastic substrates, because of their high stiffness.

  • 13.
    Han, Sang Sub
    et al.
    NanoScience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826, United States; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, South Korea.
    Ko, Tae-Jun
    NanoScience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826, United States.
    Shawkat, Mashiyat Sumaiya
    NanoScience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826, United States; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826, United States.
    Shum, Alex Ka
    Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826, United States.
    Bae, Tae-Sung
    Analytical Research Division, Korea Basic Science Institute, Jeonju 54907, South Korea.
    Chung, Hee-Suk
    Analytical Research Division, Korea Basic Science Institute, Jeonju 54907, South Korea.
    Ma, Jinwoo
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27606, United States.
    Sattar, Shahid
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Linnaeus University, SE-39231 Kalmar, Sweden.
    Hafiz, Shihab Bin
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102, United States.
    Mahfuz, Mohammad M. Al
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102, United States.
    Mofid, Sohrab Alex
    NanoScience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826, United States.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oh, Kyu Hwan
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, South Korea.
    Ko, Dong-Kyun
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102, United States.
    Jung, Yeonwoong
    NanoScience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826, United States; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826, United States.
    Peel-and-Stick Integration of Atomically Thin Nonlayered PtS Semiconductors for Multidimensionally Stretchable Electronic Devices2022In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 14, no 17, p. 20268-20279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various near-atom-thickness two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) crystals with unparalleled electromechanical properties have been explored for transformative devices. Currently, the availability of 2D vdW crystals is rather limited in nature as they are only obtained from certain mother crystals with intrinsically possessed layered crystallinity and anisotropic molecular bonding. Recent efforts to transform conventionally non-vdW three-dimensional (3D) crystals into ultrathin 2D-like structures have seen rapid developments to explore device building blocks of unique form factors. Herein, we explore a “peel-and-stick” approach, where a nonlayered 3D platinum sulfide (PtS) crystal, traditionally known as a cooperate mineral material, is transformed into a freestanding 2D-like membrane for electromechanical applications. The ultrathin (∼10 nm) 3D PtS films grown on large-area (>cm2) silicon dioxide/silicon (SiO2/Si) wafers are precisely “peeled” inside water retaining desired geometries via a capillary-force-driven surface wettability control. Subsequently, they are “sticked” on strain-engineered patterned substrates presenting prominent semiconducting properties, i.e., p-type transport with an optical band gap of ∼1.24 eV. A variety of mechanically deformable strain-invariant electronic devices have been demonstrated by this peel-and-stick method, including biaxially stretchable photodetectors and respiratory sensing face masks. This study offers new opportunities of 2D-like nonlayered semiconducting crystals for emerging mechanically reconfigurable and stretchable device technologies.

  • 14.
    Hooshmand, Saleh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Norberg, Nicholas
    PANalytical.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Dry-Spun Single-Filament Fibers Comprising Solely Cellulose Nanofibers from Bioresidue2015In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 7, no 23, p. 13022-13028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrated that low-cost and environmentally friendly filaments of native cellulose can be prepared by dry spinning an aqueous suspension of cellulose nanofibers (CNF). The CNF were extracted from banana rachis, a bioresidue from banana cultivation. The relationship between spinning rate, CNF concentration, and the mechanical properties of the filaments were investigated and the results showed that the modulus of the filaments was increased from 7.8 to 12.6 GPa and the strength increased from 131 to 222 MPa when the lowest concentration and highest speed was used. This improvement is believed to be due to an increased orientation of the CNF in the filament. A minimum concentration of 6.5 wt % was required for continuous filament spinning using the current setup. However, this relatively high concentration is thought to limit the orientation of the CNF in the filament. The process used in this study has a good potential for upscaling providing a continuous filament production with well-controlled speed, but further work is required to increase the orientation and subsequently the mechanical properties.

  • 15.
    Infantes-Molina, Antonia
    et al.
    Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía (Unidad Asociada al ICP-CSIC), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, Campus de Teatinos, 29071 Málaga, Spain.
    Villanova, Andrea
    Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Via Torino 155, 30172 Mestre Venezia, Italy.
    Talon, Aldo
    Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Via Torino 155, 30172 Mestre Venezia, Italy.
    Gilzad Kohan, Mojtaba
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Gradone, Alessandro
    CNR-IMM Bologna Section, Via Piero Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna, Italy. Chemistry Department “Giacomo Ciamician”, University of Bologna, via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna, Italy.
    Mazzaro, Raffaello
    CNR-IMM Bologna Section, Via Piero Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna, Italy.
    Morandi, Vittorio
    CNR-IMM Bologna Section, Via Piero Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna, Italy.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Via Torino 155, 30172 Mestre Venezia, Italy.
    Moretti, Elisa
    Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Via Torino 155, 30172 Mestre Venezia, Italy.
    Au-Decorated Ce–Ti Mixed Oxides for Efficient CO Preferential Photooxidation2020In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 12, no 34, p. 38019-38030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the photocatalytic behavior of gold nanoparticles supported on CeO2–TiO2 nanostructured matrixes in the CO preferential oxidation in H2-rich stream (photo-CO-PROX), by modifying the electronic band structure of ceria through addition of titania and making it more suitable for interacting with free electrons excited in gold nanoparticles through surface plasmon resonance. CeO2 samples with different TiO2 concentrations (0–20 wt %) were prepared through a slow coprecipitation method in alkaline conditions. The synthetic route is surfactant-free and environmentally friendly. Au nanoparticles (<1.0 wt % loading) were deposited on the surface of the CeO2–TiO2 oxides by deposition–precipitation. A benchmarking sample was also considered, prepared by standard fast coprecipitation, to assess how a peculiar morphology can affect the photocatalytic behavior. The samples appeared organized in a hierarchical needle-like structure, with different morphologies depending on the Ti content and preparation method, with homogeneously distributed Au nanoparticles decorating the Ce–Ti mixed oxides. The morphology influences the preferential photooxidation of CO to CO2 in excess of H2 under simulated solar light irradiation at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The Au/CeO2–TiO2 systems exhibit much higher activity compared to a benchmark sample with a non-organized structure. The most efficient sample exhibited CO conversions of 52.9 and 80.2%, and CO2 selectivities equal to 95.3 and 59.4%, in the dark and under simulated sunlight, respectively. A clear morphology–functionality correlation was found in our systematic analysis, with CO conversion maximized for a TiO2 content equal to 15 wt %. The outcomes of this study are significant advancements toward the development of an effective strategy for exploitation of hydrogen as a viable clean fuel in stationary, automotive, and portable power generators.

  • 16.
    Iqbal, Muhammad Naeem
    et al.
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm SE-106 91, Sweden; Sigrid Therapeutics AB, Stockholm, Stockholm 113 29, Sweden.
    Robert-Nicoud, Ghislaine
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm SE-106 91, Sweden; Sigrid Therapeutics AB, Stockholm, Stockholm 113 29, Sweden.
    Ciurans Oset, Marina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Akhtar, Farid
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Hedin, Niklas
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm SE-106 91, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Tore
    Sigrid Therapeutics AB, Stockholm, Stockholm 113 29, Sweden; Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm SE-106 91, Sweden.
    Mesoporous Silica Particles Retain Their Structure and Function while Passing through the Gastrointestinal Tracts of Mice and Humans2023In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 9542-9553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mesoporous silica particles (MSPs) can be used as food additives, clinically for therapeutic applications, or as oral delivery vehicles. It has also been discussed to be used for a number of novel applications including treatment for diabetes and obesity. However, a major question for their possible usage has been if these particles persist structurally and retain their effect when passing through the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). A substantial breaking down of the particles could reduce function and be clinically problematic for safety issues. Hence, we investigated the biostability of MSPs of the SBA-15 kind prepared at large scales (100 and 1000 L). The MSPs were orally administered in a murine model and clinically in humans. A joint extraction and calcination method was developed to recover the MSPs from fecal mass, and the MSPs were characterized physically, structurally, morphologically, and functionally before and after GIT passage. Analyses with N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and as a proxy for general function, adsorption of the enzyme α-amylase, were conducted. The adsorption capacity of α-amylase on extracted MSPs was not reduced as compared to the pristine and control MSPs, and adsorption of up to 17% (w/w) was measured. It was demonstrated that the particles did not break down to any substantial degree and retained their function after passing through the GITs of the murine model and in humans. The fact the particles were not absorbed into the body was ascribed to that they were micron-sized and ingested as agglomerates and too big to pass the intestinal barrier. The results strongly suggest that orally ingested MSPs can be used for a number of clinical applications.

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  • 17.
    Keshavarzi, Neda
    et al.
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rad, Farshid Mashayekhy
    Department of Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mace, Amber
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ansari, Farhan
    Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Akhtar, Farid
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Nilsson, Ulrika
    Department of Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berglund, Lars
    Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergström, Lennart
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nanocellulose-Zeolite Composite Films for Odor Elimination2015In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 7, no 26, p. 14254-14262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Free standing and strong odor-removing composite films of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) with a high content of nanoporous zeolite adsorbents have been colloidally processed. Thermogravimetric desorption analysis (TGA) and infrared spectroscopy combined with computational simulations showed that commercially available silicalite-1 and ZSM-5 have a high affinity and uptake of volatile odors like ethanethiol and propanethiol, also in the presence of water. The simulations showed that propanethiol has a higher affinity, up to 16%, to the two zeolites compared with ethanethiol. Highly flexible and strong free-standing zeolite CNF films with an adsorbent loading of 89 w/w% have been produced by Ca-induced gelation and vacuum filtration. The CNF-network controls the strength of the composite films and 100 mu m thick zeolite CNF films with a CNF content of less than 10 vol % displayed a tensile strength approaching 10 MPa. Headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis showed that the CNF zeolite films can eliminate the volatile thiol-based odors to concentrations below the detection ability of the human olfactory system. Odor removing zeolite-cellulose nanofibril films could enable improved transport and storage of fruits and vegetables rich in odors, for example, onion and the tasty but foul-smelling South-East Asian Durian fruit.

  • 18.
    Li, Jing
    et al.
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, Ohio, United States; State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, China.
    Han, Yylan
    School of Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China.
    Lin, Han
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, Ohio, United States.
    Wu, Nanhua
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, China.
    Li, Qinkun
    School of Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China.
    Jiang, Jun
    School of Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, Ohio, United States.
    Cobalt–Salen-Based Porous Ionic Polymer: The Role of Valence on Cooperative Conversion of CO2 to Cyclic Carbonate2020In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 609-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cobalt-salen-based porous ionic polymers, which are composed of cobalt and halogen anions decorated on the framework, effectively catalyze the CO2 cycloaddition reaction of epoxides to cyclic carbonates under ambient conditions. The cooperative effect of bifunctional active sites of cobalt as the Lewis acidic site and the halogen anion as the nucleophile responds to the high catalytic performance. Moreover, density functional theory results indicate that the cobalt valence state and the corresponding coordination group influence the rate-determining step of the CO2 cycloaddition reaction and the nucleophilicity of halogen anions.

  • 19.
    Milan, Riccardo
    et al.
    SENSOR Lab, Department of Information Engineering, University of Brescia, Department of Information Engineering, University of Brescia, CNR-INO SENSOR Lab.
    Hassan, Mehwish
    Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Industriale, INSTM and University of Brescia.
    Selopal, Gurpreet Singh
    SENSOR Lab, Department of Information Engineering, University of Brescia, Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi, Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, CNR and Università di Padova.
    Borgese, Laura
    University of Brescia, Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Industriale, INSTM and University of Brescia.
    Natile, Marta Maria
    Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa, Universita Degli Studi di Padova, Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi, Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, CNR and Università di Padova.
    Depero, Laura E.
    INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Industriale, INSTM and University of Brescia.
    Sberveglieri, Giorgio
    Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa, Universita Degli Studi di Brescia, Dipartimento di Economia Aziendale , SENSOR Lab, Department of Information Engineering, University of Brescia, Department of Information Engineering, University of Brescia, CNR-INO SENSOR Lab.
    Concina, Isabella
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    A Player Often Neglected: Electrochemical Comprehensive Analysis of Counter Electrodes for Quantum Dot Solar Cells2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 7766-7776Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role played by the counter electrode (CE) in quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) is crucial: it is indeed responsible for catalyzing the regeneration of the redox electrolyte after its action to take back the oxidized light harvesters to the ground state, thus keeping the device active and stable. The activity of CE is moreover directly related to the fill factor and short circuit current through the resistance of the interface electrode–electrolyte that affects the series resistance of the cell. Despite that, too few efforts have been devoted to a comprehensive analysis of this important device component. In this work we combine an extensive electrochemical characterization of the most common materials exploited as CEs in QDSSCs (namely, Pt, Au, Cu2S obtained by brass treatment, and Cu2S deposited on conducting glass via spray) with a detailed characterization of their surface composition and morphology, aimed at systematically defining the relationship between their nature and electrocatalytic activity.

  • 20.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Ji, Tuo
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Chen, Long
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Mehra, Nitin
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Paving the Thermal Highway with Self-Organized Nanocrystals in Transparent Polymer Composites2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, no 42, p. 29080-29087Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phonon transfer is greatly scattered in traditional polymer composites due to the unpaired phonon frequency at the polymer/filler interface. A key innovation of this work is to build continuous crystal network by self-organization and utilize it as “thermal highway” that circumvents the long-existing interfacial thermal barrier issue in traditional composites. By tuning the molecular diffusion rate of dicarboxylic acids (oxalic acid, malonic acid, and succinic acid), different crystal structures including skeletal, dendrite, diffusion-limited aggregates, and spherulite were synthesized in PVA film. These continuous crystal structures benefit the efficient phonon transfer in the composites with minimized interfacial scattering and lead to a significant thermal conductivity enhancement of up to 180% compared to that of pure polymer. Moreover, the transparent feature of these composite films provides additional benefits in display applications. The post heat treatment effect on the thermal conductivity of the composite films shows a time-dependent behavior. These uniquely structured polymer/crystal composites are expected to generate significant impacts in thermal management applications.

  • 21.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Ji, Tuo
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Chen, Long
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Yuan, Ruixia
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Wang, Huaiyuan
    School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University, Daqing.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Ionic Grease Lubricants: Protic [Triethanolamine][Oleic acid] and Aprotic [Choline][Oleic acid]2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, no 7, p. 4977-4984Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ionic liquid lubricants or lubricant additives have been studied intensively over past decades. However, ionic grease serving as lubricant has rarely been investigated so far. In this work, novel protic [Triethanolamine][Oleic acid] and aprotic [Choline][Oleic acid] ionic greases are successfully synthesized. These ionic greases can be directly used as lubricants without adding thickener or other additives. Their distinct thermal and rheological properties are investigated and well correlated to their tribological properties. It is revealed that aprotic ionic grease shows superior temperature and pressure tolerant lubrication properties than protic ionic grease. The lubrication mechanism is studies and it reveals that strong physical adsorption of ionic grease onto friction surface plays a dominating role for promoted lubrication instead of tribo-chemical film formation.

  • 22.
    Ojuva, Arto
    et al.
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm 10691, Sweden; Berzelii Center EXSELENT on Porous Materials, Stockholm University, Stockholm 10691, Sweden.
    Akhtar, Farid
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm 10691, Sweden; Berzelii Center EXSELENT on Porous Materials, Stockholm University, Stockholm 10691, Sweden.
    Tomsia, Antoni P
    Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States.
    Bergström, Lennart
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm 10691, Sweden.
    Laminated adsorbents with very rapid CO2 uptake by freeze-casting of zeolites2013In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 2669-2676Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Pakharenko, Viktoriya
    et al.
    Center for Biocomposites and Biomaterials Processing, Graduate Department of Forestry, John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design, University of Toronto, 33 Willcocks Street, Toronto M5S3E8, Canada.
    Mukherjee, Sankha
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S3E4, Canada; Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302, India.
    Dias, Otavio Augusto Titton
    Center for Biocomposites and Biomaterials Processing, Graduate Department of Forestry, John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S3E8, Canada.
    Wu, Crystal
    Center for Biocomposites and Biomaterials Processing, Graduate Department of Forestry, John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S3E8, Canada.
    Manion, Joseph
    Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S3H6, Canada.
    Singh, Chandra Veer
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S3E4, Canada.
    Seferos, Dwight
    Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S3H6, Canada.
    Tjong, Jimi
    Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S3G8, Canada.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King’s College Road, Toronto M5S3G8, Canada.
    Sain, Mohini
    Center for Biocomposites and Biomaterials Processing, Graduate Department of Forestry, John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design, University of Toronto, 33 Willcocks Street, Toronto M5S3E8, Canada; Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King’s College Road, Toronto M5S3G8, Canada.
    Thermoconformational Behavior of Cellulose Nanofiber Films as a Device Substrate and Their Superior Flexibility and Durability to Glass2021In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 13, no 34, p. 40853-40862Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design and high-throughput manufacturing of thin renewable energy devices with high structural and atomic configurational stability are crucial for the fabrication of green electronics. Yet, this concept is still in its infancy. In this work, we report the extraordinary durability of thin molecular interlayered organic flexible energy devices based on chemically tuned cellulose nanofiber transparent films that outperform glass by decreasing the substrate weight by 50%. The nanofabricated flexible thin film has an exceptionally low thermal coefficient of expansion of 1.8 ppm/K and a stable atomic configuration under a harsh fabrication condition (over 190 °C for an extended period of 5 h). A flexible optoelectronic device using the same renewable cellulose nanofiber film substrate was found to be functionally operational over a life span of 5 years under an intermittent operating condition. The success of this device’s stability opens up an entirely new frontier of applications of flexible electronics. 

  • 24.
    Selopal, Gurpreet Singh
    et al.
    SENSOR Lab, Department of Information Engineering, University of Brescia, 25133 Brescia, Via Valotti 9, Italy; CNR-INO SENSOR Lab, 25123 Brescia, Via Branze 45, Italy.
    Memarian, Nafiseh
    Faculty of Physics, Semnan University, Semnan, Iran.
    Milan, Riccardo
    SENSOR Lab, Department of Information Engineering, University of Brescia, 25133 Brescia, Via Valotti 9, Italy; CNR-INO SENSOR Lab, 25123 Brescia, Via Branze 45, Italy.
    Concina, Isabella
    SENSOR Lab, Department of Information Engineering, University of Brescia, 25133 Brescia, Via Valotti 9, Italy; CNR-INO SENSOR Lab, 25123 Brescia, Via Branze 45, Italy.
    Sberveglieri, Giorgio
    SENSOR Lab, Department of Information Engineering, University of Brescia, 25133 Brescia, Via Valotti 9, Italy; CNR-INO SENSOR Lab, 25123 Brescia, Via Branze 45, Italy.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    SENSOR Lab, Department of Information Engineering, University of Brescia, 25133 Brescia, Via Valotti 9, Italy; CNR-INO SENSOR Lab, 25123 Brescia, Via Branze 45, Italy.
    Effect of blocking layer to boost photoconversion efficiency in ZnO dye-sensitized solar cells2014In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 6, no 14, p. 11236-11244Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Shah, Faiz Ullah
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Glavatskih, Sergei
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Antzutkin, Oleg
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Synthesis, physicochemical, and tribological characterization of S-Di-n-octoxyboron-O,O′-di-n-octyldithiophosphate2009In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 1, no 12, p. 2835-2842Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dialkyldithiophosphates (DTPs) of zinc(II), copper(II), and other metals have been extensively used as multifunctional additives in lubricants to control friction and reduce wear in mechanical systems. Among these DTP compounds, zinc dialkyldithiophosphates (ZnDTPs) are the most common additives extensively used for more than 60 years. These additives form a protective film on steel surfaces and, thus, control friction and reduce wear. However, ZnDTPs contain zinc and large amounts of phosphorus and sulfur, which impair the environment, both directly and indirectly, by adversely affecting the performance of catalytic converters of various automobiles. For this reason, environmental legislation imposes limitations on concentrations of phosphorus, sulfur, and zinc in the lubricants. In this work, we report on zinc-free S-di-n-octoxyboron-O,O′-di-n-octyldithiophosphate (DOB-DTP) lubricant additive with amount of phosphorus and sulfur reduced by half in a molecule as compared with ZnDTPs. DOB-DTP was synthesized by a reaction in two steps under inert nitrogen atmosphere. The final product, a viscous liquid, was characterized by the elemental analysis, FT-IR, multinuclear 1H, 13C, 31P, and 11B NMR spectroscopy and thermal analyses. Tribological performance of a mineral oil with this new additive was evaluated in comparison with O,O′-di-n-butyl-dithiophosphato-zinc(II) (ZnDTP) using a four-ball tribometer. The surface morphology and the elemental composition of the tribofilms were characterized using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The results show that DOB-DTP has a considerably better antiwear performance and higher stability of the coefficient of friction with time as compared with ZnDTP. Both phosphorus and sulfur were detected by the EDS on the worn steel surfaces at all concentrations of additives in the base oil.

  • 26.
    Shah, Faiz Ullah
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Glavatskih, Sergei
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Höglund, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Lindberg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Antzutkin, Oleg
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Interfacial antiwear and physicochemical properties of alkylborate-dithiophosphates2011In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 956-968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boron compounds have become of interest in tribology because of their unique tribochemical and tribological properties. At the same time, dialkyldithiophosphates (DTPs) of transition metals have been extensively used as multifunctional additives in lubricants to control friction and reduce wear in mechanical systems. Because of the environmental pollution and health hazards of these compounds, ashless compounds with reduced amounts of sulfur and phosphorus are desirable. This work reports on the synthesis, characterization, and tribological properties of a new class of compounds, alkylboratedithiophosphates. This class combines two high-iron-affinity surface active groups, borate and dialkyldithiophosphate, into a single molecule. The final products, viscous liquids, were characterized by FT-IR, multinuclear 1H, 13C, 31P, and 11B NMR spectroscopy and thermal analyses. Residues of one representative compound from this class, DPB-EDTP, after thermal analyses were additionally characterized by multinuclear 13C, 31P and 11B MAS and 31P CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. Solid-state NMR data suggest that a dominant part of the solid residue of DPB-EDTP consists of borophosphates. Antiwear and friction properties of a mineral oil with these novel additives were evaluated in a four-ball tribometer in comparison with O,O0-di-n-butyl-dithiophosphato-zinc (II), Zn-BuDTP, as a reference lubricant additive. The surface morphology and the elemental composition of the tribofilms were characterized using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-rays spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The results show that alkylborate-dithiophosphates, with substantially reduced amounts of sulfur and phosphorus compared with Zn-BuDTP, have considerably better antiwear and friction performance.

  • 27.
    Siddique, Suniya
    et al.
    MIIT Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallic and Intermetallic Materials Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, P. R. China.
    Gong, Yaru
    MIIT Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallic and Intermetallic Materials Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, P. R. China.
    Abbas, Ghulam
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Yaqoob, Manzar Mushaf
    Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, P. R. China.
    Li, Shuang
    MIIT Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallic and Intermetallic Materials Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, P. R. China.
    Zulkifal, Shahzada
    MIIT Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallic and Intermetallic Materials Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, P. R. China.
    Zhang, Qingtang
    MIIT Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallic and Intermetallic Materials Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, P. R. China.
    Hou, Yunxiang
    MIIT Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallic and Intermetallic Materials Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, P. R. China.
    Chen, Guang
    MIIT Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallic and Intermetallic Materials Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, P. R. China.
    Tang, Guodong
    MIIT Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallic and Intermetallic Materials Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, P. R. China.
    Realizing High Thermoelectric Performance in p-Type SnSe Crystals via Convergence of Multiple Electronic Valence Bands2022In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 4091-4099Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SnSe crystals have gained considerable interest for their outstanding thermoelectric performance. Here, we achieve excellent thermoelectric properties in Sn0.99–xPbxZn0.01Se crystals via valence band convergence and point-defect engineering strategies. We demonstrate that Pb and Zn codoping converges the energy offset between multiple valence bands by significantly modifying the band structure, contributing to the enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. The carrier concentration and electrical conductivity can be optimized, leading to an enhanced power factor. The dual-atom point-defect effect created by the substitution of Pb and Zn in the SnSe lattice introduces strong phonon scattering, significantly reducing the lattice thermal conductivity to as low as 0.284 W m–1 K–1. As a result, a maximum ZT value of 1.9 at 773 K is achieved in Sn0.93Pb0.06Zn0.01Se crystals along the bc-plane direction. This study highlights the crucial role of manipulating multiple electronic valence bands in further improving SnSe thermoelectrics.

  • 28.
    Solomon, Getachew
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Mazzaro, Raffaello
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    You, Shujie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Natile, Marta Maria
    CNR-Institute of Condensed Matter Chemistry and Technologies for Energy (ICMATE), Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Padova, Padova , Italy.
    Morandi, Vittorio
    CNR-Institute of Microelectronics and Microsystem (IMM), Bologna, Italy.
    Concina, Isabella
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Ag2S/MoS2 Nanocomposites Anchored on Reduced Graphene Oxide: Fast Interfacial Charge Transfer for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction2019In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 11, no 25, p. 22380-22389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogen evolution reaction through electrolysis holds great potential as a clean, renewable, and sustainable energy source. Platinum-based catalysts are the most efficient to catalyze and convert water into molecular hydrogen; however, their large-scale application is prevented by scarcity and cost of Pt. In this work, we propose a new ternary composite of Ag2S, MoS2, and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) flakes via a one-pot synthesis. The RGO support assists the growth of two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheets partially covered by silver sulfides as revealed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Compared with the bare MoS2 and MoS2/RGO, the Ag2S/MoS2 anchored on the RGO surface (the ternary system Ag2S/MoS2/RGO) demonstrated a high catalytic activity toward hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Its superior electrochemical activity toward HER is evidenced by the positively shifted (−190 mV vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)) overpotential at a current density of −10 mA/cm2 and a small Tafel slope (56 mV/dec) compared with a bare and binary system. The Ag2S/MoS2/RGO ternary catalyst at an overpotential of −200 mV demonstrated a turnover frequency equal to 0.38 s–1. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was applied to understand the charge-transfer resistance; the ternary sample shows a very small charge-transfer resistance (98 Ω) at −155 mV vs RHE. Such a large improvement can be attributed to the synergistic effect resulting from the enhanced active site density of both sulfides and to the improved electrical conductivity at the interfaces between MoS2 and Ag2S. This ternary catalyst opens up further optimization strategies to design a stable and cheap catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction, which holds great promise for the development of a clean energy landscape.

  • 29.
    Vasiliev, Petr
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Lab.
    Akhtar, Farid
    Stockholm University, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Lab.
    Grins, Jekabs
    Stockholm University, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Lab.
    Mouzon, Johanne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Andersson, Charlotte
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Lab.
    Strong hierarchically porous monoliths by pulsed current processing of zeolite powder assemblies2010In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 732-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Binderless hierarchically porous monoliths have been produced from silicalite-1 and ZSM-5 zeolite powders by a rapid and facile powder processing method where the zeolite powders are assembled in a graphite die and subjected simultaneously to a compressive pressure and a pulsed current. Pulsed current processing (PCP) or, as it is commonly called, spark plasma sintering, enables rapid thermal processing of zeolite powder assemblies with heating and cooling rates at 100 degrees C/minute or more, which results in the formation of strong powder bodies without any addition of secondary binders. Nitrogen adsorption measurements show that it is possible to form strong zeolite monoliths by PCP that maintain between 85 and 95% of the surface area of the as-received silicalite-1 and ZSM-5 powders. Line-broadening analysis of X-ray powder diffraction data by the Rietveld method and high-resolution electron microscopy showed that the formation of strong interparticle bonds is associated with a local amorphization reaction at the interfacial contact points between the zeolite particles. The PCP-treated binderless ZSM-5 monoliths display a high selectivity in xylene isomer separation.

  • 30.
    Wang, Changmeng
    et al.
    Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, P. R. China.
    Tong, Xin
    Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, P. R. China.
    Wang, Wenhao
    Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, P. R. China.
    Xu, Jing-Yin
    Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, P. R. China.
    Besteiro, Lucas V.
    Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, P. R. China. Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 Boul. Lionel Boulet, J3X 1S2 Varennes, Québec, Canada.
    Channa, Ali Imran
    Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, P. R. China.
    Lin, Feng
    Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, P. R. China.
    Wu, Jiang
    Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, P. R. China.
    Wang, Qiang
    State Key Laboratory of Applied Organic Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Special Function Materials and Structure Design, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000, P. R. China.
    Govorov, Alexander O.
    Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, P. R. China. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701, United States.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Via Torino 155, 30170 Venezia, Mestre, Italy.
    Wang, Zhiming M.
    Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, P. R. China.
    Manipulating the Optoelectronic Properties of Quasi-type II CuInS2/CdS Core/Shell Quantum Dots for Photoelectrochemical Cell Applications2020In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 12, no 32, p. 36277-36286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colloidal core/shell heterostructured quantum dots (QDs) possessing quasi-type II band structure have demonstrated effective surface passivation and prolonged exciton lifetime, leading to enhanced charge separation/transfer efficiencies that are promising for photovoltaic device applications. Herein, we synthesized CuInS2 (CIS)/CdS core/shell heterostructured QDs and manipulated the optoelectronic properties via controlling the CdS shell thickness. The shell-thickness-dependent optical properties indicate the existence of a quasi-type II band structure in such core/shell QDs, which was verified by ultrafast spectroscopy and theoretical simulations. These quasi-type II core/shell QDs having various shell thicknesses are used as light absorbers for the fabrication of solar-driven QDs-based photoelectrochemical (PEC) devices, exhibiting an optimized photocurrent density of ∼6.0 mA/cm2 and excellent stability under simulated AM 1.5G solar illumination. The results demonstrate that quasi-type II CIS/CdS core/shell heterostructured QDs with tailored optoelectronic properties are promising to realize high-performance QDs-based solar energy conversion devices for the production of solar fuels.

  • 31.
    Wang, Hongdong
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. Applied Materials Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois , United States.
    Liu, Yuhong
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Liu, Wenrui
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Kunpeng
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Li, Jinjin
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Ma, Tianbao
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Levent Eryilmaz, Osman
    Applied Materials Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, United States.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Erdemir, Ali
    Applied Materials Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, United States.
    Luo, Jianbin
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Superlubricity of Polyalkylene Glycol Aqueous Solutions Enabled by Ultrathin Layered Double Hydroxide Nanosheets2019In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 11, no 22, p. 20249-20256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It was previously proved that the existence of a large amount of hydrogen ions in water-based lubricants can easily lead to a superlubric state; however, it was also shown that these hydrogen ions could cause severe corrosion. As part of a large family of attractive clays, layered double hydroxides (LDHs) possess excellent tribological properties in water-based lubrication systems. In the present work, two different kinds of LDHs are dispersed in polyalkylene glycol (PAG) aqueous solutions, in two distinct forms: ultrathin nanosheets (ULDH-NS) of ca. 60 nm wide and ca. 1 nm thick (single or double layer) and nanoparticles (LDH-NP) of ca. 19.73 nm wide and ca. 8.68 nm thick. We find that the addition of ULDH-NS greatly shortens (as much as 85%) the running-in period prior to reaching the superlubricity regime and increases the ultimate load-bearing capacity by about four times. As compared to the fluid film thickness of the lubricating PAG solution, their ultrathin longitudinal dimension will not impair or influence the fluid film coverage in the contact zone. The analysis of sliding solid surfaces and the atomic force microscope microscale friction test demonstrate that the adsorption of ULDH-NS enables the sliding solid surfaces to be polished and protected because of their relatively weak interlayer interaction and increased adhesion effect. Owing to their superior tribological properties as lubricant additives, ultrathin LDH nanosheets hold great potential for enabling liquid superlubricity in industrial applications in the future.

  • 32.
    Wang, Mengjing
    et al.
    NanoScience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826, United States.
    Ko, Tae-Jun
    NanoScience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826, United States.
    Shawkat, Mashiyat Sumaiya
    NanoScience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826, United States. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816, United States.
    Han, Sang Sub
    NanoScience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826, United States. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, South Korea.
    Okogbue, Emmanuel
    NanoScience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826, United States. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816, United States.
    Chung, Hee-Suk
    Analytical Research Division, Korea Basic Science Institute, Jeonju 54907, South Korea.
    Bae, Tae-Sung
    Analytical Research Division, Korea Basic Science Institute, Jeonju 54907, South Korea.
    Sattar, Shahid
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Gil, Jaeyoung
    Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, South Korea.
    Noh, Chanwoo
    Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, South Korea.
    Oh, Kyu Hwan
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, South Korea.
    Jung, YounJoon
    Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, South Korea.
    Larsson, J. Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Jung, Yeonwoong
    NanoScience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826, United States. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816, United States. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826, United States.
    Wafer-Scale Growth of 2D PtTe2 with Layer Orientation Tunable High Electrical Conductivity and Superior Hydrophobicity2020In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 12, no 9, p. 10839-10851Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Platinum ditelluride (PtTe2) is an emerging semimetallic two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) crystal with intriguing band structures and unusual topological properties. Despite much devoted efforts, scalable and controllable synthesis of large-area 2D PtTe2 with well-defined layer orientation has not been established, leaving its projected structure–property relationship largely unclarified. Herein, we report a scalable low-temperature growth of 2D PtTe2 layers on an area greater than a few square centimeters by reacting Pt thin films of controlled thickness with vaporized tellurium at 400 °C. We systematically investigated their thickness-dependent 2D layer orientation as well as its correlated electrical conductivity and surface property. We unveil that 2D PtTe2 layers undergo three distinct growth mode transitions, i.e., horizontally aligned holey layers, continuous layer-by-layer lateral growth, and horizontal-to-vertical layer transition. This growth transition is a consequence of competing thermodynamic and kinetic factors dictated by accumulating internal strain, analogous to the transition of Frank–van der Merwe (FM) to Stranski–Krastanov (SK) growth in epitaxial thin-film models. The exclusive role of the strain on dictating 2D layer orientation has been quantitatively verified by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) strain mapping analysis. These centimeter-scale 2D PtTe2 layers exhibit layer orientation tunable metallic transports yielding the highest value of ∼1.7 × 106 S/m at a certain critical thickness, supported by a combined verification of density functional theory (DFT) and electrical measurements. Moreover, they show intrinsically high hydrophobicity manifested by the water contact angle (WCA) value up to ∼117°, which is the highest among all reported 2D TMDCs of comparable dimensions and geometries. Accordingly, this study confirms the high material quality of these emerging large-area 2D PtTe2 layers, projecting vast opportunities employing their tunable layer morphology and semimetallic properties from investigations of novel quantum phenomena to applications in electrocatalysis.

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