Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Segerstedt, Eugenia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Diversity of livelihoods and social sustainability in established mining communities2019In: The Extractive Industries and Society, ISSN 2214-790X, E-ISSN 2214-7918, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 610-619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The challenges for any community that seeks to maintain a healthy and thriving social life around an operating mine have been considered at some length in research, but the picture is still far from complete. In order to pinpoint some of the gaps in research, the literature on social sustainability as applied to established mining communities in developed countries is here reviewed, and the general understanding of the social sustainability of such communities is touched on. Diversity of livelihoods is explored as an analytical lens which can be used to approach social sustainability challenges without essentializing the preferences of social groups. Extensive literature searches with keywords such as mining, work, gender, organization, social, sustainability, community, town, area, cohesion and inclusion were conducted. The results of our review show a research gap between studies of mining companies and studies of wider mining communities. We conclude that considering diversity of livelihoods can be a productive analytical tool when approaching aspects of social sustainability such as social cohesion and inclusion, gender equality, managed migration, demographics, and housing infrastructure. Continued research is recommended to further bridge the gap between studies of mining companies and studies of mining communities from the perspective of social sustainability.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Sturesson, Annie
    et al.
    Overseas Development Institute (ODI).
    Zobel, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative in Uganda: Who will take the lead when the government falters?2015In: The Extractive Industries and Society, ISSN 2214-790X, E-ISSN 2214-7918, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 33-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uganda is expected to join the group of African oil producing countries in 2018. The Government of Uganda (GoU) has high hopes for the sector and expects oil to transform the country from a low-income into a competitive upper middle-income country by 2040. However, despite these claims, the GoU’s management of the sector is already being criticized, specifically over corruption and tax disputes with oil companies. The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiativ (EITI) has, during the last decade, gained increased recognition as a standard for promoting transparency and revenue disclosure for resource-rich countries. In the 2008 National Oil and Gas Policy (NOGP), the GoU expressed its intention to adopt the standard. The objective of this paper is to analyze why the GoU, seven years later, has still not made any progress with an EITI process. Furthermore, it assesses the leverage and motivation for non-government stakeholders (development partners, civil society and oil companies) to take the lead on the EITI and compensate for the lack of political will.

  • 3.
    Thorén Hedin, Lisa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Ranängen, Helena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Community involvement and development in Swedish mining2017In: The Extractive Industries and Society, ISSN 2214-790X, E-ISSN 2214-7918, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 630-639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community involvement and development is a major component of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). It can be achieved through philanthropy, as well as development projects and social investments. The mining industry is at the cutting edge when it comes to CSR. However, research in this area has largely focused on the strategic level and corporate intentions, rather than practical implementation, and mostly from a non-European and community-focused perspective. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to reflect critically on why and how a Swedish mining company and their representatives are committed to community involvement and development and how this can be furthered. A case study method was selected, with data being collected via interviews and documentation. The results show that the mining industry needs to develop an improved understanding of the community’s expectations and allow citizens to become more involved in decision-making processes. The use of objectives and key performance indicators to monitor and continuously improve these efforts is of great importance, for example by evaluating donations and sponsorships. Community involvement and development can be improved by paying attention to research on the social licence to operate and by adopting a more proactive approach.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf