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  • 1.
    Broström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Andersson, Ulf
    Gustafsson, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Scale-Model Articulated Vehicle with Individual Wheel Drives for Traction Control Studies2015In: International Journal of Vehicle Systems Modelling and Testing, ISSN 1745-6436, E-ISSN 1745-6444, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 305-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small scale model vehicles have been successfully used in multiple projects for research and for evaluation of models. ArtiTRAX, an experimental platform designed at Luleå University of Technology, is introduced to study the behaviour of articulated vehicles with individually driven wheels. Three case studies are presented: energy efficiency due to load transfer, online tyre parameter estimation and articulation angle control. The platform was shown to be a valuable asset for research in this area. It gives insight into the problem of controlling overactuated systems and the design hazard of using multiple integrators. ArtiTRAX is shown to be controllable through a kinematic model by only using actuation of the wheel drives. The difference of energy consumption as a function of longitudinal torque distribution indicates that the effectiveness of the motors should be considered when controlling the motor currents. The lateral distribution of motor current as a function of the articulation angle has to be considered in order to minimise the energy consumption of an articulated vehicle. Further research is necessary for understanding the mechanisms and relations between the energy consumption and the controlled motor currents

  • 2.
    Bruzelius, F
    et al.
    Volvo Technology.
    Svendenius, J
    Haldex.
    Yngve, S
    Volvo Cars.
    Olsson, G
    Saab Automobile.
    Casselgren, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andersson, M
    Volvo Technology.
    Rönnberg, J
    Saab Automobile.
    Löfving, S.
    Evaluation of tyre to road friction estimators: test methods and metrics2010In: International Journal of Vehicle Systems Modelling and Testing, ISSN 1745-6436, E-ISSN 1745-6444, Vol. 5, no 2-3, p. 213-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tyre to road contact friction is one of the most important properties when it comes to manoeuvrability of ground vehicles and information, to driver and vehicle, is of vital importance in critical situations. Different characteristics of different friction estimation methods make it hard to determine and compare performance of estimators. This article is an attempt to define and evaluate the performance of tyre to road friction estimators. The objective of the performance evaluation is to define and grade the performance of estimators based on all sorts of approaches and combinations of these. The result may be used in the context of benchmarking as well as a tool in the development process of the estimator. The test methods and metrics presented are illustrated with a comparative study of three different estimation approaches.

  • 3.
    Casselgren, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Engström, Niclas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Rosendahl, Sara
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Fransson, Lennart
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Investigation of ice surface change during vehicle testing2014In: International Journal of Vehicle Systems Modelling and Testing, ISSN 1745-6436, E-ISSN 1745-6444, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 137-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, there are a lot of vehicles and tyre testing carried out on lake ice surfaces. Thus, it is important to have knowledge about parameters that affect roadgrip. The thesis within this paper is that the liquid like layer which appears due to increasing temperature can be reduced by manipulating the ice roughness. This in turn should decrease the temperature dependence of the roadgrip in temperatures around 0°C. In order to investigate this, measurements of temperature, surface roughness and hardness and roadgrip were performed on three outdoor ice surfaces using an IR thermometer, an optical sensor with three IR-diodes, a steel ball drop indentation test and an RT3 curve, respectively. Additional ice roughness measurements were also made on two tempered ice surfaces in an ice hall. Results show a clear connection between ice temperature and roadgrip, unfortunately the created ice roughness was too small to influence the change in roadgrip

  • 4.
    Casselgren, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Rosendahl, Sara
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Engström, Niclas
    LKAB, SE-981-86 Kiruna, Sweden.
    Grönlund, Ulrika
    Autoliv Sverige AB, Active Saftey Tech Center, Linköping, Sweden.
    Evaluation of velocity and curvature dependence for roadgrip measured by low lateral slip2017In: International Journal of Vehicle Systems Modelling and Testing, ISSN 1745-6436, E-ISSN 1745-6444, Vol. 12, no 1/2, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Roadgrip is an important parameter for vehicle testing and road maintenance. Therefore, an evaluation of the velocity and curvature effects on roadgrip measurement was performed on asphalt roads and on two ice tracks using the continuous roadgrip apparatus RT3 Curve. The aim was to find suitable driving patterns for measurements on public roads and test tracks to ensure the repeatability of roadgrip measurements. During the evaluation, it was concluded that in order to achieve a reliable roadgrip value, regardless of road conditions, the radius of curvature should not be less than 20 m. The velocity dependency of the RT3 Curve is different for the two road conditions, with the measurements on ice being much more sensitive to velocity changes than the measurements on the dry asphalt.

  • 5.
    Casselgren, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Sjödahl, Mikael
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Leblanc, James
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Model-based winter road classification2012In: International Journal of Vehicle Systems Modelling and Testing, ISSN 1745-6436, E-ISSN 1745-6444, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 268-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An investigation of different road conditions has been conducted using a short-wave infrared (SWIR) light online sensor to examine the possibility of estimating road condition parameters such as porosity, depth and roughness. These parameters are essential for non-contact road friction estimation. The investigation show that it is possible to detect changes of depths of water and ice as well as classify different types of ice, by utilising polarised short-wave infrared (SWIR) light and a modified Hapke directional reflectance model

  • 6.
    Fredriksson, Håkan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    van Deventer, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Engström, Niclas
    Ash, Jeremy
    Anthony Best Dynamics Ltd.
    Automotive winter testing with path-following steering robot2015In: International Journal of Vehicle Systems Modelling and Testing, ISSN 1745-6436, E-ISSN 1745-6444, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 29-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When testing modern active safety systems on cars, it is essential to test vehicle response to steering inputs. This paper highlights the use of a path-following steering robot for repetitive car testing in winter conditions. Experiments have been made with commonly used test sequences, e.g., lane-change, double lane-change, constant radius circle, and handling circuit. The steering input from the human driver is replaced by a steering robot and a path-following algorithm. The main focus for this paper is to describe what happens when one pushes the path-following system to, and beyond, the physical limitations of road grip when cornering at high vehicle speed. It shows that, with an appropriate tuning of the path-following parameters, the system performs predictably and satisfactorily. The overall conclusion is that a path-following steering robot is indeed useful for repetitive test in winter conditions with poor road grip.

1 - 6 of 6
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