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  • 1.
    An, Rong
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering. Herbert Gleiter Institute of Nanoscience, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing.
    Zhou, Guobing
    School of Chemical Biological and Materials Engineering, University of Oklahoma.
    Zhu, Yudan
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University.
    Zhu, Wei
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University.
    Huang, Liangliang
    School of Chemical Biological and Materials Engineering, University of Oklahoma.
    Shah, Faiz Ullah
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Friction of Ionic Liquid–Glycol Ether Mixtures at Titanium Interfaces: Negative Load Dependence2018In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 5, no 14, article id 1800266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Structural reorientation of alkyl chains in the phosphonium cation of orthoborate ionic liquid mixed with glycol ether occurs with increasing normal load of the AFM tip. The flat reoriented structure, similar to the ‘blooming lotus leaf’, produces a new sliding interface that is responsible for the observed lower friction at higher loads. This work is reported by Rong An, Liangliang Huang, Faiz Ullah Shah and co‐workers in article number 1800263.

  • 2.
    An, Rong
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering. Herbert Gleiter Institute of Nanoscience, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing.
    Zhou, Guobing
    School of Chemical Biological and Materials Engineering, University of Oklahoma.
    Zhu, Yudan
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University.
    Zhu, Wei
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University.
    Huang, Liangliang
    School of Chemical Biological and Materials Engineering, University of Oklahoma.
    Shah, Faiz Ullah
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Friction of Ionic Liquid–Glycol Ether Mixtures at Titanium Interfaces: Negative Load Dependence2018In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 5, no 14, article id 1800263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The atomic force microscopy experiments and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations demonstrate a negative friction–load dependence to ionic liquid–glycol ether mixtures, that is, the friction decreases as the normal load increases. NEMD simulations reveal a structural reorientation of the studied ionic liquid (IL): as the normal load increases, the cation alkyl chains of ILs change the orientation to preferentially parallel to the tip scanning path. The flat‐oriented IL structures, similar to the “blooming lotus leaf,” produce a new sliding interface and reduce the friction. A further molecular dynamics simulation is carried out by adopting slit‐pore models to mimic the tip approaching process to confirm the dynamics of ILs. A faster diffusion of ILs in the smaller slit pore is observed. The faster diffusion of ILs in the more confined slit pore facilitates the structural reorientation of ILs. The resulted new sliding surface is responsible for the observed smaller friction at higher loads, also known as the negative friction–load dependence. These findings provide a fundamental explanation to the role of ILs in interfacial lubrications. They help to understand liquid flow properties under confinement, with implications for the development of better nanofluidic devices.

  • 3.
    Dong, Yihui
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented and Chemical Engineering Nanjing Tech University.
    Laaksonen, Aatto
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry Arrhenius Laboratory Stockholm University. Centre of Advanced Research in Bionanoconjugates and Biopolymers Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry Aleea Grigore Ghica-Voda, Iasi, Romania. State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented and Chemical Engineering Nanjing Tech University, China.
    Cao, Wei
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Ji, Xiaoyan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Lu, Xiaohua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented and Chemical Engineering Nanjing Tech University Nanjing, China.
    AFM Study of pH-Dependent Adhesion of Single Protein to TiO2 Surface2019In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 6, no 14, article id 1900411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of pH-induced electrostatic conditions on the molecular interaction force of a single lysozyme molecule with TiO2 is investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The force between the charged or neutral lysozyme molecule and the TiO2 surface is measured at different pH from 3.6 to 10.8. It is found to be directly proportional to the contact area, given by an effective diameter of the lysozyme molecule, and is further qualitatively verified by the AFM-measured friction coefficients. The results of the Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek theory show that the pH can change the surface charge densities of both lysozyme and TiO2, but the molecular interaction force at different pH is only dependent on the pH-induced effective diameter of lysozyme. The molecular interaction forces, quantified at the nanoscale, can be directly used to design high-performance liquid chromatography measurements at macroscale by tuning the retention time of a protein under varied pH conditions. They can also be applied to develop a model for predicting and controlling the chromatographic separations of proteins.

  • 4.
    Wu, Jian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, China.
    Mu, Liwen
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Feng, Xin
    Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, China.
    Lu, Xiaohua
    Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, China.
    Larsson, Roland
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Poly(alkylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide)-Based Polymerized Ionic Liquids: A Potential  High-Performance Lubricating Grease2019In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 6, no 5, article id 1801796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymers prepared from ionic liquids are widely called polymerized ionic liquids (PILs). Compared to monocationic and dicationic ILs, PILs have higher molecular weights, charge, and greater intermolecular interactions, which make PILs have a higher possibility to generate better lubricity. PILs of poly‐alkylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (PImC6NTf2) is studied herein. Dicationic ILs of 1,1′‐(pentane‐1,5‐diyl)‐bis(3‐butylimidazolium) bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BIm5‐(NTf2)2) is used as additive to decrease the crystallization temperature of PImC6NTf2. Lubricity of PImC6NTf2 and PImC6NTf2+BIm5‐(NTf2)2, as well as BIm5‐(NTf2)2 for comparison is evaluated under severe conditions, i.e., 3.0 to 3.5 GPa and 200 °C. The rheological study suggests that PImC6NTf2 can be classified into grease. Tribological test results show that PImC6NTf2 has much better antiwear property than BIm5‐(NTf2)2, especially at 3.5 GPa. Adding 4% BIm5‐(NTf2)2 to PImC6NTf2 is able to reduce friction under high pressure. At 200 °C, PImC6NTf2 exhibits excellent lubricity. The mixture of 96%PImC6NTf2+4%BIm5‐(NTf2)2 shows even better antiwear property than neat PImC6NTf2 and exhibits the highest friction reducing property among the ILs at 200 °C. It is speculated that the robust strength of PILs and strong adhesion between PILs and solids are key factors in achieving the excellent antiwear property.

  • 5.
    Yu, Qiangliang
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences Lanzhou.
    Wang, Yurong
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences Lanzhou.
    Huang, Guowei
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences Lanzhou.
    Ma, Zhengfeng
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences Lanzhou.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Cai, Meirong
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences Lanzhou.
    Zhou, Feng
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences Lanzhou.
    Liu, Weimin
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences Lanzhou.
    Task-Specific Oil-Miscible Ionic Liquids Lubricate Steel/Light Metal Alloy: A Tribochemistry Study2018In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 5, no 19, article id 1800791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to increase the solubility of ionic liquids in base oils and to improve the lubricating performance of light alloys, two new ionic liquids comprised of sulfonate base anion and phosphonium based cation are designed and synthesized. The difference between these two ionic liquids is the cation: One has only one organophosphate group (P88816DOSS) and the other has two organophosphate group (P888PDOSS). The copper strip corrosion test is used to evaluate the anticorrosion properties of new developed ionic liquids. Tribological properties of the ionic liquids are investigated by an optimal SRV-IV oscillating tribometer. The results indicate that the new designed ionic liquids show very good solubility in traditional mineral-based oils. P88816DOSS and P888PDOSS show excellent friction reduction, antiwear performance accompanied with effective anticorrosion properties for the mineral base oil. Surface analysis results show that the superior properties of P88816DOSS and P888PDOSS are attributed to surface chemical reactions between ionic liquids and light metal.

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