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  • 1.
    Parding, Karolina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    The need for learning arenas: non-indigenous teachers working in indigenous school contexts2013In: Education, Citizenship and Social Justice, ISSN 1746-1979, E-ISSN 1746-1987, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 242-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work contexts shape conditions for work. Teachers working in Indigenous school contexts face conditions different from teachers working in mainstream schools. Challenging working conditions for these teachers result in high teacher turnover, making it even more difficult for already disadvantaged students to progress. From a social justice perspective, this disruption in learning requires looking at the working conditions for teachers in Indigenous school contexts. Using interviews, this article examines how non-Indigenous teachers working in Indigenous school contexts in Australia experience their working conditions. The interviews reveal ‘learning gaps’ that seem to be associated with their lack of opportunities to develop context-specific professional knowledge.

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