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  • 1.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Umeå University.
    Pettersson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Implementing multi-level governance?: the legal basis and implementation of the EU water framework directive for forestry in Sweden2012In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 90-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Commission Water Framework Directive (WFD) aims to achieve ‘good status’ for all waters by 2015. This study reviews implementation mechanisms with regard to forestry in Sweden, a country with a large proportion of forest land, where forest practices will be important for limiting nutrient and particle runoff that impact the water status. Taking a multi-level governance perspective, this study reviews the legislative requirements at the EU level, legal and policy implementation at the Swedish level and, finally, local implementation in the forest industry. The study illustrates the national specific interpretation of the WFD as well as the way in which existing practices and measures influence WFD implementation. These include for example the Swedish practice to integrate environmental values in forestry via ‘considerations’, supported also by the use of forest certification measures (a voluntary private sector initiative through which environmental consideration is controlled by third-party auditors). The study thereby exemplifies the large role of private and overlapping authorities and jurisdictions in Swedish forest-water governance.

  • 2.
    Matti, Simon
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Newell, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Values, beliefs and elite decision-making: The case of the Markbygden wind power development2017In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outputs of political processes, i.e. policy, reflect rational cost-benefit calculations and power relationships, but are also shaped by the values and beliefs of policy actors, i.e. sovereigns, involved in the decision-making process. Values and beliefs affect how rational analyses and power relationships are understood and valued by sovereigns. This article suggests that understanding sovereigns’ values and beliefs is, however, necessary but insufficient for understanding concrete policy outputs, particularly in complex policy processes characterized by conflicting interests and values. In such cases, sovereigns are forced to prioritize among their values and beliefs. This article proposes a framework for studying how sovereigns prioritize among their values and beliefs. This framework is then used to study a complex policy process ridden with conflicts of interest and value-conflicts, which highlights the value and necessity of studying sovereigns, their values and beliefs, as well as the prioritizations they make among those values and beliefs.

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  • 3.
    Sandström, Annica
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Legitimacy in Co-Management: The Impact of Preexisting Structures, Social Networks and Governance Strategies2014In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 60-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the ambition to contribute to the endeavour of co-management, this paper focuses on the critical aspect of legitimacy and sets out to explain stakeholder acceptance in natural resource governance. A comparative study of five coastal and marine areas in Sweden is conducted. The empirical results demonstrate, first, how the past and the present institutional landscape set the underlying conditions and affect stakeholders’ acceptance of new co-management initiatives. Second, the results point to the critical function of network governance. Conscious choices regarding what composition of actors to involve, and in particular the inclusion and commitment of government actors, have significant bearing on stakeholder acceptance. Furthermore, deliberative efforts to reframe the process, adjusting the agenda to ongoing collaborative processes and key stakeholder goals, are seemingly as important. Thus, strivings towards legitimate co-management require skilful manoeuvring of the present institutional landscape as well as deliberate strategies for the evolution of social networks

  • 4.
    Sandström, Annica
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Söderberg, Charlotta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Lundmark, Carina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Nilsson, Jens
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Fjellborg, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Assessing and explaining policy coherence: A comparative study of water governance and large carnivore governance in Sweden2020In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 3-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the relationship between different types of multi-level governance systems and policy coherence (i.e., uniformity of goals and rules) through a study of the governance systems for water and large carnivores in Sweden. The study objects represent multi-level governance systems for contested natural resources in the same national context, though in different policy areas and with substantial differences in institutional arrangements. We define the characteristics of each governance system through an institutional analysis of official records and compare their perceived ability to promote coherence through a statistical analysis of survey data. Our empirical results both support and problematize common ideas about how different institutional features relate to policy coherence in multi-level governance. The results clearly indicate that multi-level governance systems are challenged by conflicting goals and rules, both within and across governance systems, and that the capacity to address these difficulties is generally perceived as wanting in both types of systems. The results tentatively suggest that clashes with other governance systems are more prominent in polycentric and ecologically based systems, while internal goal and rule conflicts are more prevalent in centralized and more traditionally organized systems.

    The findings contribute to our understanding of the quandaries associated with the design of new governance systems. The study also contributes important insights into what features to focus on in attempts to mitigate the downsides of different institutional arrangements in multi-level governance systems.  

  • 5.
    Sevä, Mikael
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Decisions at Street Level: Assessing and explaining the implementation of the European Water Framework Directive in Sweden2017In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 74-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the role of street-level bureaucrats in water management and examines what factors influence the implementation of the programme of measures that are part of the European Water Framework Directive. The impact of two factors - the bureaucrats' policy understandings and their implementation resources - on implementation is examined through a qualitative case study at sub-national level in Sweden. The results verify the critical role of these bureaucrats as only one-third make decisions, or take action, based on the programme of measures. The results further suggest that the bureaucrats' understandings of how coherent the policies are, and whom they consult in cases of uncertainty, are important. The implementing bureaucrats perceive policy as coherent and have rich networks of advice, including responsible government authorities, while the non-implementing bureaucrats experience significant policy incoherencies and have sparse advice networks. Thus, policy-makers can support implementation by adjusting policy and by improving existing, and organizing new, resources to provide these bureaucrats with guidance

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