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  • 1.
    Du, Andao
    et al.
    National Research Centre of Geoanalysis, 26 Baiwanzhun Dajie, Beijing, China.
    Wu, Shuqi
    National Research Centre of Geoanalysis, 26 Baiwanzhun Dajie, Beijing, China.
    Sun, Dezhong
    National Research Centre of Geoanalysis, 26 Baiwanzhun Dajie, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Shuxian
    National Research Centre of Geoanalysis, 26 Baiwanzhun Dajie, Beijing, China.
    Qu, Wenjun
    National Research Centre of Geoanalysis, 26 Baiwanzhun Dajie, Beijing, China.
    Markey, Richard
    AIRIE Group, Department of Earth Resources, Colorado Slate University, Colorado, USA.
    Stain, Holly
    AIRIE Group, Department of Earth Resources, Colorado Slate University, Colorado, USA;U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO, US.
    Morgan, John
    AIRIE Group, Department of Earth Resources, Colorado Slate University, Colorado, USA.
    Malinovskiy, Dmitry
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Preparation and certification of Re-Os dating reference materials: Molybdenites HLP and JDC2004In: Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research, ISSN 1639-4488, E-ISSN 1751-908X, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 41-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two Re-Os dating reference material molybdenites were prepared. Molybdenite JDC and molybdenite HLP are from a carbonate vein-type molybdenum-(lead)-uranium deposit in the Jinduicheng-Huanglongpu area of Shaanxi province, China. The samples proved to be homogeneous, based on the coefficient of variation of analytical results and an analysis of variance test. The sampling weight was 0.1 g for JDC and 0.025 g for HLP. An isotope dilution method was used for the determination of Re and Os. Sample decomposition and pre- concentration of Re and Os prior to measurement were accomplished using a variety of methods: acid digestion, alkali fusion, ion exchange and solvent extraction. Negative thermal ionisation mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry were used for the determination of Re and 187Os concentration and isotope ratios. The certified values include the contents of Re and Os and the model ages. For HLP, the Re content was 283.8 ± 6.2 µg g-1, 187Os was 659 ± 14 ng g-1 and the Re-Os model age was 221.4 ± 5.6 Ma. For JDC, the Re content was 17.39 ± 0.32 µg g-1, 187Os was 25.46 ± 0.60 ng g-1 and the Re-Os model age was 139.6 ± 3.8 Ma. Uncertainties for both certified reference materials are stated at the 95% level of confidence. Three laboratories (from three countries: P.R. China, USA, Sweden) joined in the certification programme. These certified reference materials are primarily useful for Re-Os dating of molybdenite, sulfides, black shale, etc. .

  • 2.
    Gutjahr, Marcus
    et al.
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Wischhofstrasse 1‐3, 24148 Kiel, Germany.
    Bordier, Louise
    Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement, LSCE/IPSL, CEA‐CNRS‐UVSQ, Université Paris‐Saclay, F‐91191 Gif‐sur‐Yvette, France.
    Douville, Eric
    Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement, LSCE/IPSL, CEA‐CNRS‐UVSQ, Université Paris‐Saclay, F‐91191 Gif‐sur‐Yvette, France.
    Farmer, Jesse
    Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences and Lamont‐Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, 61 Route 9W Palisades, NY, 10964 USA; Princeton University, Department of Geosciences, Guyot Hall, Princeton, NJ, 08544, USA.
    Foster, Gavin L.
    School of Ocean and Earth Science, University of Southampton, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, European Way, Southampton, SO14 3ZH, UK.
    Hathorne, Ed C.
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Wischhofstrasse 1‐3, 24148 Kiel, Germany.
    Hönisch, Bärbel
    Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences and Lamont‐Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, 61 Route 9W Palisades, NY, 10964, USA.
    Lemarchand, Damien
    Laboratoire d'Hydrologie et de Géochimie de Strasbourg, EOST, Université de Strasbourg et CNRS, 1 rue Blessig, 67084 Strasbourg, France.
    Louvat, Pascale
    Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Université Paris‐Diderot, UMR CNRS 7154, 1 rue Jussieu, 75238 Paris, Cedex, France.
    McCulloch, Malcolm
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Earth and Environment, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, 6009 Australia.
    Noireaux, Johanna
    Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Université Paris‐Diderot, UMR CNRS 7154, 1 rue Jussieu, 75238 Paris, Cedex, France.
    Pallavicini, Nicola
    ALS Scandinavia AB, Aurorum 10, SE‐97775 Luleå, Sweden.
    Rae, James W.B.
    Geological and Planetary Sciences, Caltech, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, California, 91125, USA; School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of St Andrews, North Street, St Andrews, UK.
    Rodushkin, Ilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. ALS Scandinavia AB, Aurorum 10, SE‐97775 Luleå, Sweden.
    Roux, Philippe
    Laboratoire d'Hydrologie et de Géochimie de Strasbourg, EOST, Université de Strasbourg et CNRS, 1 rue Blessig, 67084 Strasbourg, France; Biogéochimie des Ecosystèmes Forestiers, INRA, 54280 Champenoux, France.
    Stewart, Joseph A.
    School of Ocean and Earth Science, University of Southampton, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, European Way, Southampton, SO14 3ZH UK; School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Queens Road, Bristol, BS8 1RJ, UK.
    Thil, François
    Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement, LSCE/IPSL, CEA‐CNRS‐UVSQ, Université Paris‐Saclay, F‐91191 Gif‐sur‐Yvette, France.
    You, Chen‐Feng
    Isotope Geochemistry Laboratory, Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, No 1 University Road, 701 Tainan, Taiwan.
    Sub‐Permil Interlaboratory Consistency for Solution‐Based Boron Isotope Analyses on Marine Carbonates2021In: Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research, ISSN 1639-4488, E-ISSN 1751-908X, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 59-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boron isotopes in marine carbonates are increasingly used to reconstruct seawater pH and atmospheric pCO2 through Earth’s history. While isotope ratio measurements from individual laboratories are often of high quality, it is important that records generated in different laboratories can equally be compared. Within this Boron Isotope Intercomparison Project (BIIP), we characterised the boron isotopic composition (commonly expressed in δ11B) of two marine carbonates: Geological Survey of Japan carbonate reference materials JCp‐1 (coral Porites) and JCt‐1 (giant clam Tridacna gigas). Our study has three foci: (i) to assess the extent to which oxidative pre‐treatment, aimed at removing organic material from carbonate, can influence the resulting δ11B; (ii) to determine to what degree the chosen analytical approach may affect the resultant δ11B, and (iii) to provide well‐constrained consensus δ11B values for JCp‐1 and JCt‐1. The resultant robust mean and associated robust standard deviation (s*) for un‐oxidised JCp‐1 is 24.36 ± 0.45‰ (2s*), compared with 24.25 ± 0.22‰ (2s*) for the same oxidised material. For un‐oxidised JCt‐1, respective compositions are 16.39 ± 0.60‰ (2s*; un‐oxidised) and 16.24 ± 0.38‰ (2s*; oxidised). The consistency between laboratories is generally better if carbonate powders were oxidatively cleaned prior to purification and measurement.

  • 3.
    Rodushkin, Ilya
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Engström, Emma
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Baxter, Douglas
    Evaluation of simultaneous analyte leaching/vapour phase introduction for direct os isotope ratio measurements in solid samples by double focusing sector field ICP-MS2007In: Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research, ISSN 1639-4488, E-ISSN 1751-908X, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 27-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The analytical performance of a hyphenated method for Os isotope ratio measurements by double focusing, sector field ICP-MS (ICP-SFMS) was evaluated. The method is based on several optimised, concurrent processes: Os extraction from samples in hot concentrated nitric acid; separation of Os from the digest solution by formation of volatile osmium tetroxide accelerated by continuous hydrogen peroxide addition; transport of analyte vapour by an oxygen flow into the ICP; and isotopic analysis by ICP-SFMS. Due to the very efficient analyte utilisation (in excess of 0.5‰), isotope ratio measurement can be performed at low pg Os levels. Combined with the ability to process sample sizes up to 2 g (up to 50 g if the organic matrix of biological or botanical samples is eliminated by ashing), materials with Os concentrations in the low, or even sub-pg g-1 range can be analysed by the method. Given that two complete digestion/distillation systems are available for interchangeable use, throughputs of up to 15 samples per 8-hour shift can be achieved. The method precision, evaluated as the long-term reproducibility of 187Os/188Os ratio measurements in a commercial Os standard containing 0.5 ng Os, was 0.16% relative standard deviation (RSD, 1 s). The method has been applied to perform replicate 187Os/188Os ratio measurements in a suite of 50 reference materials of various origins and matrix compositions, with Os concentrations varying from <0.1 pg g-1 to >100 ng g-1, yielding an average precision of 3% RSD. Though none of the materials tested are certified for Os content or Os isotope composition, comparison of the obtained data with published Os isotope information for similar sample types revealed close agreement between the two. The method can also be used for the simultaneous, semi-quantitative approximation of Os concentrations.

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