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  • 1.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Student-driven health promotion activities2013In: Health Education, ISSN 0965-4283, E-ISSN 1758-714X, Vol. 113, no 5, p. 407-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The aim was to examine how students experienced creating, leading and praticipating in student-driven health promoting activities in cooperation with their teacher. Design/methodology/approach - Inspired by the PAAR method (participatory appreciative action research) 19 Swedish students, ages 10-11 participated in health promotion work in the classroom through creating, leading, participating in and evaluating their own and their peers’ health promoting activities.Findings - The analysis of the student’s health promoting activities resulted in three themes; (i) the friendly touch (ii) the outdoor run for fun (iii) the sounds of well-being, including health promotion tools such as music, massage, physical activity and the outdoors.Originality/value - The comprehensive understanding of how students experienced creating, leading and participating in student-driven health promoting activities in cooperation with their teacher, revealed three key points; i) When students were asked to choose health promoting activities, they were not only in line with existing research but were able to reflect on how to develop praxis, ii) Students are competent to lead health promoting activities with the support of their teacher and participating in health promoting activities lead by their peers, iii) The group assignment in this study offer one example of implementing health promoting activities in school to increase health literacy

  • 2.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    The power of appreciation: promoting schoolchildren’s health literacy2016In: Health Education, ISSN 0965-4283, E-ISSN 1758-714X, Vol. 116, no 6, p. 611-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to explore Swedish children’s positive experiences of health and well-being, and their thoughts on how health literacy can be promoted.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Totally, 121 schoolchildren between the ages of 10 and 14 from three schools in two municipalities in the northern part of Sweden shared their lived experiences through individual written reflections.

    Findings

    The phenomenological analysis resulted in one theme, appreciation as fuel for health and well-being, and four sub-themes: feeling a sense of belonging; being cared for by others; being respected and listened to; and feeling valued and confirmed. The understanding of the schoolchildren’s experiences of health and well-being and their thoughts on how health literacy can be promoted revealed that appreciation in different forms is the key dimension of their experiences of health and well-being.

    Practical implications

    The findings of this study point to the necessity of promoting health education that includes reflection and action-awareness of one’s own and others’ health as well as the competence to know how and when to improve their health. Such health education can contribute to the development of health literacy in young people, an essential skill for the twenty-first century.

    Originality/value

    This study’s originality is that the authors added the concepts of appreciative inquiry and student voice to the study of health literacy with children.

  • 3.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Hallberg, Josef
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Gamification of health education: Schoolchildren’s participation in the development of a serious game to promote health and learning2018In: Health Education, ISSN 0965-4283, E-ISSN 1758-714X, Vol. 118, no 4, p. 354-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The use of modern technology has many challenges and risks. However, by collaborating with schoolchildren, ideas to effectively promote health and learning in school can be identified. This study aimed to examine how a participatory approach can deepen the understanding of how schoolchildren relate to and use gamification as a tool to promote physical activity and learning.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Inspired by the concept and process of empowerment and child participation, the methodological focus of this study was on consulting schoolchildren. During a 2-month period, 18 schoolchildren (10–12-years-old) participated in workshops to create game ideas that would motivate them to be physically active and learn in school.

    Findings

    The phenomenological analysis resulted in one main theme, ‘Playing games for fun to be the best I can be’. This consisted of four themes with two sub-themes each. The findings offer insights on how to increase physical activity and health education opportunities using serious games in school.

    Originality/value

    The knowledge gained provides gamification concepts and combinations of different technological applications to increase health and learning, as well as motivational aspects suggested by the schoolchildren. The findings are discussed with health promotion and health education in mind.

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