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  • 1.
    Casselgren, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Bodin, Ulf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Reusable road condition information system for traffic safety and targeted maintenance2017In: IET Intelligent Transport Systems, ISSN 1751-956X, E-ISSN 1751-9578, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 230-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Driver awareness of current winter road conditions (RCs) is known to affect the frequency of accidents due to sudden changes in these conditions. For example, partially icy roads that appear during autumn in northern areas typically result in collisions and ditch runs unless the drivers are generally aware of the situation. Availing motorists who drive under winter RCs of enhanced information is therefore highly desirable to increase their awareness of hazardous driving conditions. Such conditions need to be predicted ahead of time and presented to drivers before they attempt slippery road sections. Moreover, the identification of slippery RCs should quickly trigger targeted road maintenance to reduce the risk of accidents. This study presents a scalable and reusable collaborative intelligent transport system, herein referred to as an RC information system (RCIS). RCIS provides accurate RC predictions and forecasts based on RC measurements, road weather observations, and short-term weather forecasts. The prediction methods in the context of the distributed RCIS have been tested using a prototype implementation. These tests confirmed that these inputs could be combined into useful and accurate information about winter RCs that can be adapted for different types of users.

  • 2.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    Interactive Institute – Sonic Studio, Piteå.
    Alm, Håkan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Auditory signs to support traffic awareness2010In: IET Intelligent Transport Systems, ISSN 1751-956X, E-ISSN 1751-9578, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 262-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In-vehicle information systems (IVIS) may contribute to increased levels of cognitive workload, which in turn can lead to a more dangerous driving behaviour. An experiment was conducted to examine the use of auditory signs to support drivers' traffic situation awareness. Eighteen experienced truck drivers identified traffic situations based on information conveyed by brief sounds. Aspects of learning, cognitive demand and pleasantness were monitored and rated by the drivers. Differences in cognitive effort was estimated using a dual-task set-up, in which drivers responded to auditory signs while simultaneously performing a simulated driving task. As expected, arbitrary sounds required significantly longer learning times compared to sounds that have a natural meaning in the driving context. The arbitrary sounds also resulted in a significant degradation in response performance, even after the drivers got a chance to learn the sounds. Finally, the results indicate that the use of arbitrary sounds can negatively impact driver satisfaction. These results have implications for a broad range of developing intelligent transport systems designed to assist drivers in absence of fundamental visual information or in visually demanding traffic situations.

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  • 3.
    Füssl, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Factum Chaloupka and Risser OG, Danhausergasse 6/4, 1040 Wien.
    Oberlader, Manuel
    Factum Chaloupka and Risser OG, Danhausergasse 6/4, 1040 Wien.
    Beanland, Vanessa
    Research School of Psychology, Australian National University.
    Spyropoulou, Ioanna
    National Technical University of Athens.
    Lenné, Michael G.
    Accident Research Centre, Monash University.
    Joshi, Somya
    Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV), Stockholm University.
    Rößger, Lars
    Technical University Dresden.
    Leden, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water. VTT.
    Underwood, Geoff
    University of Notttingham.
    Carvalhais, Jose
    Faculty of Human Kinetics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    Methodological development of a specific tool for assessing acceptability of assistive systems of powered two-wheeler-riders2015In: IET Intelligent Transport Systems, ISSN 1751-956X, E-ISSN 1751-9578, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 12-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the acceptability of assistive systems for improving the safety of powered two-wheelers (PTWs) is a pressing issue. The use of safety-enhancing assistive systems for motorised vehicles, including advanced driver assistance systems and in-vehicle information systems is widespread in many countries. Yet, there is only a limited number of equivalent intelligent transport systems (ITS) for PTWs, namely advanced rider assistance systems and on-bike information systems. This study describes the methodological development of a specific tool for assessing motorcyclists' acceptability of ITS, as part of the motorcyclists' profiling questionnaire (MOPROQ). There were three stages of development. First, a literature review was undertaken to assess the current state of the art regarding ITS for PTWs and to determine the most relevant facets of acceptability that should be measured. Second, a series of focus group interviews were conducted to explore riders' attitudes towards ITS. Finally, the focus group results were used to develop a large-scale survey (MOPROQ), which was administered to an initial sample of over 6000 riders internationally. The designed tool can be used as a basis for the determination of rider acceptability of ITS systems in the future.

  • 4.
    Hostettler, Roland
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering.
    Birk, Wolfgang
    Nordenvaad, Magnus Lundberg
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Feasibility of road vibrations-based vehicle property sensing2010In: IET Intelligent Transport Systems, ISSN 1751-956X, E-ISSN 1751-9578, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 356-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses a novel approach to vehicle property sensing based on traffic-induced road surface vibrations and investigates the feasibility of this approach. Road surface vibrations from real-life experiments are acquired using three-axis accelerometers and the data are analysed. Based on the assessment of the data, a first coarse scheme for axle detection of passing vehicles is developed. The scheme is then evaluated using measurement data from a highway with moderate traffic intensity but diverse traffic. It is found that the proposed approach is feasible and the estimation scheme yields promising results. Furthermore, delimitations, encountered problems and identified research challenges are discussed and future research directions are given.

  • 5.
    Sollén, Sofia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Casselgren, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Large‐scale implementation of floating car data monitoring road friction2021In: IET Intelligent Transport Systems, ISSN 1751-956X, E-ISSN 1751-9578, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 727-739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden today, friction measurements are performed manually, often using methods generating spot‐wise measurements. Because the low numbers of measurements provided by these methods are insufficient to follow up on the friction requirements set by the Swedish Transport Administration, the Administration has initiated the Digital Winter project. In Digital Winter, floating car data (FCD) are utilised for road friction estimation. The focus in this investigation is on coverage, and on whether the FCD detects harsh weather conditions with decreasing road friction. Two different methods—one continuous and one slip‐based—are implemented in this investigation. Furthermore, different approaches on how to build the vehicle fleet to collect the FCD have been applied using different combinations of commercial and private vehicles. The results showed that both methods detect low‐friction events, and for roads with high annual average daily traffic (AADT), the data collection using slip‐based methods and larger fleets gives more data points than for smaller fleets using continuous methods, and the reverse is true for lower AADT. The results showed differences between the two fleets in terms of coverage for the weekly and daily distributions, but overall, the method of using FCD for road friction estimation seems promising for the follow‐up of winter road maintenance.

  • 6.
    Sowman, J.
    et al.
    Energy Technology Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK.
    Box, S.
    Transportation Research Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK.
    Wong, A.
    Transportation Research Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK.
    Grote, M.
    Transportation Research Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK.
    Laila, Dina Shona
    School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Automotive Engineering, Coventry University, Coventry, CV1 2TL, UK.
    Gillam, G.
    Transportation Research Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK.
    Cruden, A. J.
    Energy Technology Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK.
    Preston, J. M.
    Transportation Research Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK.
    Fussey, P.
    Engine Control and Calibration, Ricardo Ltd, Shoreham-by-Sea, West Sussex, BN43 5FG, UK.
    In-use emissions testing of diesel-driven buses in Southampton: is selective catalytic reduction as effective as fleet operators think?2018In: IET Intelligent Transport Systems, ISSN 1751-956X, E-ISSN 1751-9578, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 521-526Article in journal (Refereed)
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