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  • 1.
    Fältholm, Ylva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Patients - not doctors get sick: a study of fifteen Swedish physicians on long-term sick leave2007In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 19-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on in-depth interviews with 15 physicians on long-term sick leave in the north of Sweden, the aim of this paper is to describe and understand what happened before, during and after sick leave. A constructivist grounded theory approach was used to construct a framework inductively from the stories of the physicians. As a result of hierarchical coding procedures in terms of initial, focused and theoretical coding, the circular or helical road back to well-being was constructed. This core category, formed in response to structure and to the culture of the medical profession, is constituted of five categories, including dealing with changing working conditions, resisting sick and patient role, resisting sick leave, spending time on sick leave and, finally, returning to work. Not only were the physicians expected to work very hard, but also they were expected to take charge, and did take charge, of their own treatment and rehabilitation. They reinforced these phenomena, by employing strategies to deal with high workload and to avoid sick leave. None of them later returned to full-time work. Notwithstanding that, some aspects of the culture of the medical profession are destructive; in this case, it promoted a strong will and motivation to return to work.

  • 2.
    Juuso, Päivi
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Skär, Lisa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Olsson, Malin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Living with a double burden: Meanings of pain for women with fibromyalgia2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Living with fibromyalgia (FM) means living with a chronic pain condition that greatly influences daily life. The majority of people with FM are middle-aged women. The aim of this study was to elucidate meanings of pain for women with FM. Fifteen women with FM were interviewed about their pain experiences and a phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation was used to analyse the interview texts. The findings show that meanings of pain for women with FM can be understood as living with a double burden; living with an aggressive, unpredictable pain and being doubted by others in relation to the invisible pain. The ever-present pain was described as unbearable, overwhelming, and dominated the women’s whole existence. Nevertheless, all the women tried to normalize life by doing daily chores in an attempt to alleviate the pain. In order to support the women’s needs and help them to feel well despite their pain, it is important that nurses and health care personnel acknowledge and understand women with FM and their pain experiences.

  • 3.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Öhrling, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Schoolchildren from the north sharing their lived experience of health and well-being2006In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 226-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe and develop an understanding of schoolchildren's health and well-being from their own perspective. Nearly 100 schoolchildren from the northern part of Sweden, aged 10–12 years, wrote open letters and participated in group discussions as a way to share their lived experience. The phenomenological analyze resulted in three main themes; (a) associating with others; (b) actively participating and (c) being a recipient. The schoolchildren's lived experience formed an intricate unite including health and ill-health as well as well-being and lack thereof. The meaning of schoolchildren's health and well-being was understood as the experience of relationships to others and as the relationship to oneself. The relationships to others was positive or negative for schoolchildren's health and well-being depending on if they were met with a “we” in mind or not. When given the choice to participate, and if shown respect, and trust was understood as positive for schoolchildren's health and well-being, while the opposite was true when lacking these qualities in relationships with others.

  • 4.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Peers, parents and phones: Swedish adolescents and health promotion2012In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7, article id 17726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many unhealthy behaviors are created during adolescence and follow the individual into adulthood. In addition, health behaviors often occur in clusters as those who are inactive are more likely to eat unhealthy food and smoke. This makes the early foundation of healthy behaviors vital. The aim was to describe and develop an understanding of adolescents' awareness and experiences concerning health promotion. Data was collected using focus groups with a total of 28 seventh graders and was analysed with latent qualitative content analysis. One main theme was identified; being competent, ambivalent and creative at the same time. The following three subthemes also emerged: being a digital native for better and for worse, knowing what is healthy, and sometimes doing it, and considering change and having ideas of how change could be supported. The main theme elucidates how the majority of students were informed and able but they did not always prioritize their health. The concept of health promotion relies upon the engagement of the individual; however, although the students had clear ideas about how they would like to change their own behaviors, they felt a need for support. Interestingly, the students were able to make several suggestions about the kind of support that would make a difference to their adoption to more healthy modes of living. They suggested information and communication technology (ICT), for example encouraging text messages (SMS), and social support, for example parents setting rules and peers inspiring them to adhere to a healthy behavior. The knowledge gained from this study echoes our view of inclusion and this could be helpful for those who encounter the challenge of promoting health among adolescents

  • 5.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Rutberg, Stina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Parent participation plays an important part in promoting physical activity2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, article id 27397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although physical activity (PA) is an important and modifiable determinant of health, in Sweden only 15% of boys and 10%of girls aged 15 years old achieve the recommended levels of PA 7 days per week. Adolescents’ PA levels are associated withsocial influence exerted by parents, friends, and teachers. The purpose of this study was to describe parents’ experiencesof being a part of their adolescents’ empowerment-inspired PA intervention. A qualitative interview study was performedat a school in the northern part of Sweden. A total of 10 parents were interviewed, and the collected data were analyzedwith qualitative content analysis. Three subthemes were combined into one main theme, demonstrating that parents are oneimportant part of a successful PA intervention. The life of an adolescent has many options and demands that make it difficultto prioritize PA. Although parents felt that they were important in supporting their adolescent, a successful PA interventionmust have multiple components. Moreover, the parents noted that the intervention had a positive effect upon not only theiradolescents’, but also their own PA. Interventions aimed at promoting PA among adolescents should include measures tostimulate parent participation, have an empowerment approach, and preferably be school-based.

  • 6.
    Lögdberg, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Department of Culture and Media Studies, Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden..
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    "Thinking about the future, what's gonna happen?": How young people in Sweden who neither work nor study perceive life experiences in relation to health and well-being.2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1422662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore how young people in Sweden who neither work nor study perceive life experiences in relation to health and well-being.

    Methods: A task-based interview technique was used and data was analysed with qualitative content analysis. Interviews were conducted with 16 participants aged 16-20 who were unemployed and not eligible for upper secondary school, or who had dropped out of school.

    Results: Three themes emerged from the analysis illustrating how the young people perceive their life experiences in relation to health and well-being: Struggling with hardships in the absence of caring connections, Feeling good when closely connected to others, and Being forced to question what has been taken for granted. Each theme consists of 2-3 subthemes.

    Conclusion: Based on the young people's narrated experiences health can be understood as: something that is created in relation to others and in relation to the social and cultural context; as something dynamic and changeable; as the ability to adapt and respond to challenges; and finally as something existing on a collective as well as an individual level. Implications for school, social services and health promotion initiatives are discussed, with an emphasis on working with young people.

  • 7.
    Olsson, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Nilsson, Carina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Meanings of feeling well among women with Parkinson's disease2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, article id 28730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conducted a qualitative inquiry to describe the meanings of feeling well as experienced by women with Parkinson's disease. Nine women were interviewed and we analysed the interviews using a reflective lifeworld approach based on phenomenological epistemology. We present the analysis as five constituents: the body as unnoticed; being able to move on; feeling joy by being connected; finding peace and harmony; and being the director of one's own life. Our findings can be used to understand and promote well-being among women with Parkinson's disease. In care meetings, knowledge about the lived and experienced health processes supports the women's striving to not let illness dominate their experience of daily life.

  • 8.
    Olsson, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Skär, Lisa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Meanings of being received and met by others as experienced by women with MS2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 57-69Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Rutberg, Stina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Öhrling, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Travelling along a road with obstacles: Experiences of managing life to feel well while living with migraine2013In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Living a life with migraine can impair one’s sense of feeling well, and migraine is a disorder that is associated with substantial disability. Earlier research on how people manage their migraine has given important insight into these people’s preventive actions and how they handle their attacks, but there is still a lack of knowledge of how persons with migraine manage their lives to feel well from a more holistic viewpoint. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore lived experiences of managing life to feel well while living with migraine. Nineteen persons with migraine were interviewed. A hermeneuticphenomenological approach was used to explore their lived experiences. The findings reveal that persons with migraine not only used preventive strategies to abort and ease the consequences of migraine but also tried to amplify the good in life through increasing their energy and joy and through reaching peace with being afflicted with migraine. The findings of this study can encourage healthcare providers, as well as persons with migraine, to consider channeling their efforts into strategies aiming to amplify the good in life, including reaching peace of mind despite being afflicted.

  • 10.
    Sjöblom, Margareta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Öhrling, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Useful life lessons for health and well-being: adults' reflections of childhood experiences illuminate the phenomenon of the inner child2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1441592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe and gain more knowledge about the phenomenon of the inner child in relation to health and well-being reflected in events during childhood experienced by adults. Method: In this hermeneutical phenomenological study, 20 adults, 10 men and 10 women aged 22–68, were interviewed. Results: The analysis of the data illuminated the phenomenon of the inner child in one theme: Gaining useful life lessons through childhood experiences, made up by four sub-themes: Sharing relationshipsplaying to healbeing strong or frail and supporting the next generationConclusion: The participants’ experiences of events during childhood were illuminating the phenomenon of the inner child as promoting or hindering health and well-being and impact human adaptation throughout life. Our findings indicate that the participants learned useful life lessons suggesting that experiences during childhood can help us to adapt across the life span and over generations, and this is the essence of the inner child. Our findings also contribute to the health literacy discussion and detail how knowledge and action competency is developed in mental, social and existential dimensions of health and well-being.

  • 11.
    Sjöblom, Margareta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Öhrling, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Prellwitz, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Health throughout the lifespan: The phenomenon of the inner child reflected in events during childhood experienced by older persons2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 31486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe and gain more knowledge of the phenomenon of the inner child, reflected in events during childhood experienced by older persons. Thirteen older persons aged 70 to 91 years old were interviewed. A hermeneutical phenomenological analysis of the data revealed two main themes: the inner child becomes visible and the inner child's presence through life. The participants' narratives showed that their understanding of the experiences included both positive and negative feelings, as well as ways to be creative, in which the inner child became visible. The participants' experiences indicated that the inner child was present throughout the lifespan, was found in challenges that occurred in life, and could turn something bad into something good. However, the presence of the inner child could also be a source for development throughout life and could interfere with the person. The findings from this study point to older persons' need to be recognized, acknowledged, and understood as a unique person living his or her own life. In addition, dimensions of well-being such as feeling safe, loved, supported, and creating space for fantasy and possibilities can be compared to the physical, mental, social, and existential dimensions of well-being found in WHO surveys and definitions of health. This calls for a holistic approach when caring for older persons.

  • 12.
    Öhlén, Joakim
    et al.
    Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Stockholm.
    Ekman, Inger
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg.
    Bolmsjö, Ingrid
    Department of Care Science, Malmö University.
    Zingmark, Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Benzein, Eva
    Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnæus University, Kalmar.
    Conceptual development of "at-homeness" despite illness and disease: a review2014In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 9, article id 23677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Only one empirical study, the one by Zingmark, Norberg and Sandman published in 1995, explicitly focuses on at-homeness, the feeling of being metaphorically at-home, as a particular aspect of wellness. However, other studies reveal aspects of at-homeness, but if or how such aspects of at-homeness are related to each other is unclear. For this reason, the aim was to review Scandinavian nursing research related to at-homeness in the context of wellness-illness in severe and long-term conditions in order to take a step towards conceptual clarification of "at-homeness." The review included interpretive studies related to severe and long-term illness conducted in Sweden: 10 original articles and 5 doctoral theses. "At-homeness" was found to be a contextually related meaning of wellness despite illness and disease embedded in the continuum of being metaphorically at-home and metaphorically homeless. This was characterized by three interrelated aspects and four processes: being safe through expanding-limiting experiences of illness and time, being connected through reunifying-detaching ways of relating, and being centred through recognition-non-recognition of oneself in the experience and others giving-withdrawing a place for oneself. This conceptualization is to be regarded as a step in conceptual clarification. Further empirical investigation and theoretical development of "at-homeness" are needed. The conceptualization will be a step of plausible significance for the evaluation of interventions aimed at enhancing wellness for people with severe long-term illness, such as the frail elderly, and people with chronic illness or palliative care needs.

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