Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Carlsson, Lars
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Network governance of the commons2008In: International Journal of the Commons, E-ISSN 1875-0281, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 33-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The survival of the commons is closely associated with the potential to find ways to strengthen contemporary management systems, making them more responsive to a number of complexities, like the dynamics of ecosystems and related, but often fragmented, institutions. A discussion on the desirability of finding ways to establish so-called cross-scale linkages has recently been vitalised in the literature. In the same vein, concepts like adaptive management, co-management and adaptive co-management have been discussed. In essence, these ways of organizing management incorporate an implicit assumption about the establishment of social networks and is more closely related to network governance and social network theory, than to political administrative hierarchy. However, so far, attempts to incorporate social network analysis (SNA) in this literature have been rather few, and not particularly elaborate. In this paper, a framework for such an approach will be presented. The framework provides an analytical skeleton for the understanding of joint management and the establishment of cross-scale linkages. The relationships between structural network properties - like density, centrality and heterogeneity - and innovation in adaptive co-management systems are highlighted as important to consider when crafting institutions for natural resource management. The paper makes a theoretical and methodological contribution to the understanding of co-management, and thereby to the survival of the commons.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Ntuli, Herbert
    et al.
    School of Economics, University of Cape Town .
    Muchapondwa, Edwin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences. School of Economics, University of Cape Town.
    The role of institutions in community wildlife conservation in Zimbabwe2018In: International Journal of the Commons, E-ISSN 1875-0281, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 134-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Institutions play a significant role in stabilising large-scale cooperationin common pool resource management. Without restrictions to govern humanbehaviour, most natural resources are vulnerable to overexploitation. This studyused a sample size of 336 households and community-level data from 30 communitiesaround Gonarezhou National Park in Zimbabwe, to analyse the relationshipbetween institutions and biodiversity outcomes in community-based wildlifeconservation. Our results suggest a much stronger effect of institutions on biodiversityoutcomes via the intermediacy of cooperation. Overall, the performance ofmost communities was below the desired level of institutional attributes that matterfor conservation. Good institutions are an important ingredient for cooperationin the respective communities. Disaggregating the metric measure of institutionsinto its components shows that governance, monitoring and enforcement are moreimportant for increased cooperation, while fairness of institutions seems to workagainst cooperation. Cooperation increases with trust and group size, and is alsohigher in communities that have endogenised punishment as opposed to communitiesthat still rely on external enforcement of rules and regulations. Cooperationdeclines as we move from communal areas into the resettlement schemes and withincreasing size of the resource system. A very strong positive relationship existsbetween cooperation and biodiversity outcomes implying that communities withelevated levels of cooperation are associated with a healthy wildlife population.Biodiversity outcomes are more successful in communities that either receivedwildlife management training, share information or those that are located far away from urban areas and are not very close to the boundary of the game park. Erectingan electric fence, the household head’s age, the number of years in school andnumber of years living in the area negatively affect biodiversity outcomes. Onepolicy implication of this study is to increase autonomy in CAMPFIRE communitiesso that they are able to invest in good institutions, which allows them toself-organise and to manage wildlife sustainably.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Sandström, Annica
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Rova, Carl
    The network structure of adaptive governance: a single case study of a fish managment area2010In: International Journal of the Commons, E-ISSN 1875-0281, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 528-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The challenge of establishing adaptive management systems is a widely discussed topic in the literature on natural resource management. Adaptive management essentially focuses on achieving a governance process that is both sensitive to and has the capacity to continuously react to changes within the ecosystem being managed. The adoption of a network approach that perceives governance structures as social networks, searching for the kind of network features promoting this important feature, has been requested by researchers in the field. In particular, the possibilities associated with the application of a formal network approach, using the tools and concepts of social network analysis (SNA), have been identified as having significant potential for advancing this branch of research. This paper aims to address the relation between network structure and adaptability using an empirical approach. With the point of departure in a previously generated theoretical framework as well as related hypotheses, this paper presents a case study of a governance process within a fish management area in Sweden. The hypotheses state that, although higher levels of network density and centralisation promote the rule-forming process, the level of network heterogeneity is important for the existence and spread of ecological knowledge among the actors involved. According to the empirical results, restricted by the single-case study design, this assumption is still a well-working hypothesis. However, in order to advance our knowledge concerning these issues and test the validity of the hypotheses, more empirical work using a similar approach in multiple case study designs is needed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf