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  • 1.
    Li, Bin
    et al.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wichita State University.
    Emami, Nazanin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Gong, Guan
    Swerea SICOMP AB, Box 271, 941 26, Piteå.
    Song, Weidong
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wichita State University, PD Materials, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Seattle, WA 98124.
    Applications of Nanomaterials in Multifunctional Polymer Nanocomposites2016In: Journal of Nanomaterials, ISSN 1687-4110, E-ISSN 1687-4129, Vol. 2016, article id 5790194Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, School of Materials Engineering, Nanjing Institute of Technology.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, School of Materials Engineering, Nanjing Institute of Technology.
    Fan, Jingdeng
    School of Materials Engineering, Nanjing Institute of Technology.
    Zhou, Zhongxin
    School of Materials Engineering, Nanjing Institute of Technology.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Feng, Xin
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing University of Chemical Technology, State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Wang, Huaiyuan
    School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University.
    Lu, Xiaohua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Self-Lubricating Polytetrafluoroethylene/Polyimide Blends Reinforced with Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles2015In: Journal of Nanomaterials, ISSN 1687-4110, E-ISSN 1687-4129, article id 545307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ZnO nanoparticle reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene/polyimide (PTFE/PI) nanocomposites were prepared and their corresponding tribological and mechanical properties were studied in this work. The influences of ZnO loading, sliding load, and velocity on the tribological properties of ZnO/PTFE/PI nanocomposites were systematically investigated. Results reveal that nanocomposites reinforced with 3 wt% ZnO exhibit the optimal tribological and mechanical properties. Specifically, the wear loss decreased by 20% after incorporating 3 wt% ZnO compared to unfilled PTFE/PI. Meanwhile, the impact strength, tensile strength, and elongation-at-break of 3 wt% ZnO/PTFE/PI nanocomposite are enhanced by 85, 5, and 10% compared to pure PTFE/PI blend. Microstructure investigation reveals that ZnO nanoparticles facilitate the formation of continuous, uniform, and smooth transfer film and thus reduce the adhesive wear of PTFE/PI.

  • 3.
    Mudimela, Prasantha R.
    et al.
    NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics and Center for New Materials, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo.
    Nasibulina, Larisa I.
    NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics and Center for New Materials, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo.
    Nasibulin, Albert G.
    NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics and Center for New Materials, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo.
    Cwirzen, Andrzej
    Laboratory of Building Materials Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo.
    Valkeapää, Markus
    Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo.
    Habermehl-Cwirzen, Karin
    Laboratory of Building Materials Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo.
    Malm, Jari E M
    Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo.
    Karppinen, Maarit J.
    Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo.
    Penttala, Vesa
    Laboratory of Building Materials Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo.
    Koltsova, Tatiana S.
    Material Science Faculty, State Polytechnical University.
    Tolochko, Oleg V.
    Material Science Faculty, State Polytechnical University.
    Kauppinen, Esko I.
    NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics and Center for New Materials, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo.
    Synthesis of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers on silica and cement matrix materials2009In: Journal of Nanomaterials, ISSN 1687-4110, E-ISSN 1687-4129, Vol. 2009, article id 526128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to create strong composite materials, a good dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibers (CNFs) in a matrix material must be obtained. We proposed a simple method of growing the desirable carbon nanomaterial directly on the surface of matrix particles. CNTs and CNFs were synthesised on the surface of model object, silica fume particles impregnated by iron salt, and directly on pristine cement particles, naturally containing iron oxide. Acetylene was successfully utilised as a carbon source in the temperature range from 550 to 750 °C. 5-10 walled CNTs with diameters of 10-15nm at 600 °C and 12-20nm at 750 °C were synthesised on silica particles. In case of cement particles, mainly CNFs with a diameter of around 30nm were grown. It was shown that high temperatures caused chemical and physical transformation of cement particles. © 2009 Prasantha R. Mudimela et al.

  • 4.
    Nasibulina, Larisa I.
    et al.
    Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science.
    Anoshkin, Ilya V.
    Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science.
    Nasibulin, Albert G.
    Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science.
    Cwirzen, Andrzej
    Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Aalto University, School of Engineering, Espoo.
    Penttala, Vesa
    Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Aalto University, School of Engineering, Espoo.
    Kauppinen, Esko I.
    Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science.
    Effect of carbon nanotube aqueous dispersion quality on mechanical properties of cement composite2012In: Journal of Nanomaterials, ISSN 1687-4110, E-ISSN 1687-4129, Vol. 2012, article id 169262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An effect of the quality of carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersions added to cement on paste mechanical properties has been studied. High-quality dispersions of few-walled CNT (FWCNTs) were produced in two steps. First, FWCNTs were functionalized in a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids (70wt. and 96wt., resp.) at 80°C. Second, functionalized FWCNTs were washed out by acetone to remove carboxylated carbonaceous fragments (CCFs) formed during CNT oxidation. Mechanical test results showed 2-fold increase in the compressive strength of the cement paste prepared from the dispersion of acetone-washed functionalized FWCNTs, which is believed to occur due to the chemical interaction between cement matrix and functional groups (-COOH and -OH). Utilisation of unwashed FWCNTs led to a marginal improvement of mechanical properties of the cement pastes, whereas surfactant-treated functionalized FWCNT dispersions only worsened the mechanical properties. Copyright © 2012 Larisa I. Nasibulina et al.

  • 5.
    Yuwawech, Kitti
    et al.
    Nanotec-KMUTT Center of Excellence on Hybrid Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi(KMUTT), Bangkok.
    Wootthikanokkhan, Jatuphorn
    Nanotec-KMUTT Center of Excellence on Hybrid Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy, King Mongkut's University of Technology (KMUTT)Thonburi, Bangkok .
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    Nanotec-KMUTT Center of Excellence on Hybrid Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy, King Mongkut's University of Technology (KMUTT)Thonburi, Bangkok .
    Effects of Two Different Cellulose Nanofiber Types on Properties of Poly(vinyl alcohol) Composite Films2015In: Journal of Nanomaterials, ISSN 1687-4110, E-ISSN 1687-4129, Vol. 2015, article id 908689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work concerns a study on the effects of fiber types and content of cellulose nanofiber on mechanical, thermal, and optical properties polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composites. Two different types of cellulose nanofibers, which are nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and bacterial cellulose (BC), were prepared under various mechanical treatment times and then incorporated into the PVA prior to the fabrication of composite films. It was found that tensile modulus of the PVA film increased with nanofibers content at the expense of its percentage elongation value. DSC thermograms indicate that percentage crystallinity of PVA increased after adding 2-4 wt% of the fibers. This contributed to the better mechanical properties of the composites. Tensile toughness values of the PVA/BC nanocomposite films were also superior to those of the PVA/NFC system containing the same fiber loading. SEM images of the composite films reveal that tensile fractured surface of PVA/BC experienced more ductile deformation than the PVA/NFC analogue. The above discrepancies were discussed in the light of differences between the two types of fibers in terms of diameter and their intrinsic properties. Lastly, percentage total visible light transmittance values of the PVA composite films were greater than 90%, regardless of the fiber type and content.

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