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  • 1.
    Ladendorf, Martina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Media, audio technology and experience production and theater.
    The L-word: queer identifikation och mediereception2008In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, no 3-4, p. 115-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The L-word is said to be the first commercial television drama that is narratively centered on lesbian characters. How is a queer audience, in this case eighteen lesbian, bisexual or queer identified Swedish women, interpreting a homonormative mainstream media text? This article aims to read the representation and reception of The L-word against freudian psychoanalysis and spectatorship theory's splitting of identification and desire and a queer critique of these. It also discusses the lesbian sex scenes in the series through some viewers interpretations of them. In focus group interviews, viewers are identifying, counteridentifying, but mainly disidentifying with the text's construction of lesbian identity. The theoretical concept disidentification is borrowed from José Esteban Muñoz, which is something in between identification and counteridentification, where subjects can enjoy but still not completely "buy" the media text and its offered identities at large, in an ironic negotiated reading. The main aspects that viewers are not identifying with are class positions (upper middle class) and the glamourous surroundings and characters (not seen as typical for lesbians), something they saw as linked to "american-ness" and US commercial TV. But before the viewing of the televised text, an earlier identification with lesbianism is made, even among the two heterosexually (but also somewhat queer) identified interviewees. Interviewees choose to identify with different characters, or more commonly, situations, and these identifications were changing. A heterosexually identified interviewee, Ida, both identified, admired and desired the character Shane, something that puts the splitting of desire and identification into question. My analyzis further shows that there are multiple wiewing positions among the eighteen interviewees. This is particularly true for the sex scenes, where different viewers see the same scene as great, "hot", uninteresting, based on a male gaze and heterosexual norms, or even as violent.

  • 2.
    Lindberg, Malin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Män och manlighet i svensk innovationspolitik2009In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, no 2-3, p. 29-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I set out to explore how gender is being constructed in Sweden's innovation policy. Specifically, I distinguish a connection between the pattern of prioritization within this policy area and the notions ‘men' as well as ‘masculinity'. My survey of national and regional policy documents regarding public funding of innovation systems and clusters, exposes how in half of the cases the state promotes the group of Basic and Manufacturing Industries. The group of New Technologies is being furthered in a third of the cases. In a fifth of the cases, the group of Service and Experience Industries is being furthered. This means that the groups of Basic and Manufacturing Industries and New Technologies, both primarily employing men as employees and entrepreneurs, has been given high priority within Sweden's innovations policy while the group of Service and Experience Industries, employing mostly women or both men and women to the same extent, has been given a low priority. On a symbolical level, the two prioritized groups can be connected to two forms of masculinities: one based on physical strength and mechanical skills and the other on a calculating rationality among technological experts. Introducing the concept of co-construction of gender and innovation, I make visible how gender and innovation is mutually constructed within the innovation policy when the pattern of prioritization coincides with the gender segregated labour market. This co-construction rests upon an understanding of dualistic gender constructions. In order to achieve a less restricting practice within the making and execution of innovation policy programs, I find it necessary to highlight innovation systems and clusters that manage to bridge the gap between men dominated, women dominated and gender balanced branches of industry, thus erasing the need for segregating and hierarchical gender constructions in Sweden's innovation policy.

  • 3.
    Ringblom, Lisa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Omförhandling i gruvan?: om kön, arbete och förändring i den mansdominerade gruvnäringen2017In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 38, no 1-2, p. 33-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to discuss the complexity of stability and change in terms of the relation of gender and work in traditionally male-dominated workplaces, and more specifically in the Swedish mining industry. Mining has for a long time had a close relationship to men and masculinity. From the 1980s until 2005, the proportion of women miners increased from three to six per cent, but during the last ten years the proportion of women miners has increased more rapidly and today the number of women is 15 per cent. What made and makes this change possible? In this article, we merge previous studies concerning mining, gender and organization with new empirical material. Interviews with 20 miners, both men and women, were carried out to present a framework for understanding the contemporary negotiations of gender and work. Our conclusion is that the change in gender patterns can be understood through the following three interlinked processes of stability and change concerning: 1) mining work 2) the relationship between professional identity and masculinity and 3) the companies’ work towards gender equality. Together, these processes create a different outcome than before. Although much is changing in the mining industry, the stability characterizing its gendered relations is at the same time both notably durable and persistent. There is a remaining theoretical challenge to better understand these processes of change, stability and negotiation concerning the relationship of gender and work.

  • 4.
    Rönnbäck, Josefin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    'Utan kvinnor inget folkstyre': en historisk exposé över kampen för ökad kvinnorepresentation i Sverige2010In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, no 3, p. 61-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is often recognized globally as a role model regarding gender equality, and especially when it comes to women’s political representation. However, for a long time male politicians effectively kept women out and Swedish women found it difficult to enter into politics. The purpose of this article is to give a historical overview of the Swedish women´s movement and its struggle for increased political representation and present and discuss initiatives taken by Swedish women in different times, after the suffrage struggle (1921) and before the female representation increased considerably (in the 1970s). The article takes as point of departure the theoretical framework developed by Maud Eduards (2002) about women as political actors and about the meaning and consequences of women organizing themselves – especially when and if they organize themselves separately (from men). In the article I investigate questions like: When and how did Swedish women organize themselves and struggle for an increased number of women in politics? Which women did collaborate and under what circumstances and premises? How did they relate to and navigate in a party system that during this period was primarily dominated by men, men’s interests and class conflicts? The article shows that the women’s struggle over political positions and political influence in Sweden has been long and I argue, in reference to Maud Eduards, that it is of great interest how women organize themselves, with or without men, in a small or large number, direct and individually or indirect through other organisations and how they relate and respond and to the party system.The article maps important parts of the Swedish women’s movement and highlights three female and political initiatives: Föreningen Kvinnolistan (Woman’s List) in the 1920s, Kommittén för ökad kvinnorepresentation (The Committee for equal representation) in the 1930-40s and Samarbetskommittén för ökad kvinnorepresentation (The Committee for equal representation) in the end of 1960s.

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