Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Carlsson, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Still going strong: community forests in Sweden1999In: Forestry (London), ISSN 0015-752X, E-ISSN 1464-3626, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 11-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish forest commons have survived for more than one hundred years; no deforestation has been observed and the total amount of biomass is increasing. The forests are regarded by experts as well managed both in terms of efficiency and with regard to the preservation of biodiversity. Compared with other types of ownership the commons have a very special organization. The base consists of 25000 shareholders. This is a medieval pattern of ownership that seems to survive; moreover, it seems to be quite prosperous within the realm of modern society with its highly competitive forest industries. Three main explanations are discussed: the commons' conscious attempts to reduce transaction costs, their general inventiveness in adjusting to changed circumstances, and their acclimatization to the logic of the negotiated economy characterized by fuzzy borders between different sectors.

  • 2.
    Li, Songyu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Rossander, Morgan
    Skogforsk, The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Uppsala 75183, Sweden.
    Lideskog, Håkan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Vision-based planting position selection system for an unmanned reforestation machine 2024In: Forestry (London), ISSN 0015-752X, E-ISSN 1464-3626, article id cpae032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on automated seedling planting systems in forestry is a crucial aspect of forestry automation. This paper introduces the development of a vision-based automated seedling planting position selection system, integrated with hardware and software components on an unmanned forest machine platform. Developed around object detection as the core, this research presents a comprehensive system consisting of two main functionalities: (i) A vision system that performs obstacle detection and localization, providing estimated obstacle types, sizes, and positions to the plant planner function. (ii) A plant planner function utilizes this information to plan the plantable areas and selects suitable planting locations. The integrated system has been tested in the field and we found it to effectively determine suitable planting locations on the ground of a clear-cut. The implementation of this system lays the foundation for subsequent automated planting operations. Furthermore, the automation of forest seedling planting reduces the need for manual labor and enhances planting precision, contributing to improved forest health and ecological balance. Looking ahead, this research offers insights into the future development of unmanned forestry operations, making strides in automating forest management, achieving cost-effectiveness, and facilitating ecological restoration. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology.
    An inquiry into the changing pattern of pulpwood harvests in Sweden2002In: Forestry (London), ISSN 0015-752X, E-ISSN 1464-3626, Vol. 75, no 3, p. 245-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an analysis of Swedish pulpwood production from 1958 until 1995. The development of pulpwood harvests is first described. Using a partial adjustment model, the short- and long-term dynamics in the pulpwood market are then investigated. It is found that the supply responsiveness to economic stimuli such as prices and costs is low, in both the short and long term. I then investigate whether the elasticities are constant over time. The findings reveal the possibility of decreasing responsiveness over time. These results suggest that policies aimed at affecting the pulpwood supply should be based on measures other than price. Furthermore, any policies concerned with pulpwood supply need to incorporate the interaction between the pulpwood and sawtimber markets.

  • 4.
    Ulvcrona, Thomas
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Vindeln Experimental Forests, Svartberget Field Station.
    Lindberg, Henrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Bergsten, Urban
    Department of Silviculture, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Impregnation of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) wood by hydrophobic oil and dispersion patterns in different tissues2006In: Forestry (London), ISSN 0015-752X, E-ISSN 1464-3626, Vol. 79, no 1 (Spec), p. 123-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood from Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) is biologically degraded in exposed conditions. It also has anatomical features that make it difficult to impregnate with preservatives by currently available industrial processes. In the study reported here, we used the new Linotech process to impregnate Norway spruce wood with hydrophobic linseed oil and then quantified its uptake and dispersal in anatomically distinct wood tissues. We also investigated the effects of the wood moisture content on the results of the impregnation. Samples (500 x 25 x 25 mm) were taken from 15 trees in a coniferous forest in northern Sweden (64° 10' N, 160-320 m a.s.l.). The parameters for the Linotech process were 2-3 h treatment time at 0.8-1.4 MPa and 60-14°C. To determine the level of uptake, the linseed oil was extracted from the impregnated wood using methyl-tertiarybutyl-ether. The uptake was quantitatively analysed by comparing X-ray microdensitometry values obtained following impregnation both before and after oil removal. In earlywood, initial moisture content had an obvious effect on the impregnation result. Six times more oil was taken up when the moisture content was greater than ∼150 per cent than when it was less than 30 per cent. Theoretical calculations, based on density levels, suggest that the water-filled porosity of the wood (water volume divided by porosity volume) was positively correlated with the linseed oil uptake, and more strongly correlated in earlywood than in latewood. There were also significant differences in uptake between different wood tissues; heartwood/mature wood and heartwood/juvenile wood showed 10-20 per cent weight increases due to linseed oil uptake, compared with 30-50 per cent in sapwood/mature wood. Examination by scanning electron microscopy confirmed these uptake patterns. The moisture content after impregnation was about 5 per cent, irrespective of the Linotech process parameters, tissue type and initial moisture content. In conclusion, the impregnation process used here results in high levels of well-dispersed linseed oil uptake and should facilitate drying

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf