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  • 1.
    Allali, Naoual
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. LCPME, UMR CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Villers-lès-Nancy, France. SRSMC, UMR CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Faculté des Sciences et Technologies, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France.
    Urbanova, Veronika
    LCPME, UMR CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Villers-lès-Nancy, France.
    Etienne, Mathieu
    LCPME, UMR CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Villers-lès-Nancy, France.
    Devaux, Xavier
    IJL, UMR CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Nancy Cedex, France.
    Mallet, Martine
    LCPME, UMR CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Villers-lès-Nancy, France.
    Vigolo, Brigitte
    IJL, UMR CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Faculté des Sciences et Technologies, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex, France.
    Adjizian, Jean-Joseph
    IMN, UMR CNRS-Université de Nantes, Nantes, France.
    Ewels, Chris
    IMN, UMR CNRS-Université de Nantes, Nantes, France.
    Öberg, Sven
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Soldatov, Alexander
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    McRae, Edward
    IJL, UMR CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Faculté des Sciences et Technologies,Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex, France.
    Fort, Yves
    SRSMC, UMR CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Faculté des Sciences et Technologies, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France.
    Dossot, Manuel
    LCPME, UMR CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Villers-lès-Nancy, France.
    Mamane, Victor
    Institut de Chimie de Strasbourg, UMR CNRS-Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.
    Accurate control of the covalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes for the electro-enzymatically controlled oxidation of biomolecules2018In: Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology, ISSN 2190-4286, Vol. 9, p. 2750-2762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were functionalized by ferrocene through ethyleneglycol chains of different lengths (FcETGn) and the functionalized SWCNTs (f-SWCNTs) were characterized by different complementary analytical techniques. In particular, high-resolution scanning electron transmission microscopy (HRSTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) analyses support that the outer tubes of the carbon-nanotube bundles were covalently grafted with FcETGn groups. This result confirms that the electrocatalytic effect observed during the oxidation of the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) co-factor by the f-SWCNTs is due to the presence of grafted ferrocene derivatives playing the role of a mediator. This work clearly proves that residual impurities present in our SWCNT sample (below 5 wt. %) play no role in the electrocatalytic oxidation of NADH. Moreover, molecular dynamic simulations confirm the essential role of the PEG linker in the efficiency of the bioelectrochemical device in water, due to the favorable interaction between the ETG units and water molecules that prevents π-stacking of the ferrocene unit on the surface of the CNTs. This system can be applied to biosensing, as exemplified for glucose detection. The well-controlled and well-characterized functionalization of essentially clean SWCNTs enabled us to establish the maximum level of impurity content, below which the f-SWCNT intrinsic electrochemical activity is not jeopardized.

  • 2.
    Waclawik, E.R.
    et al.
    School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology.
    Chang, Jin
    School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology.
    Ponzoni, Andrea
    University of Brescia, CNR IDASC SENSOR Lab.
    Concina, Isabella
    CNR IDASC SENSOR Lab.
    Zappa, Dario
    CNR IDASC SENSOR Lab, University of Brescia.
    Comini, Elisabetta
    University of Brescia, CNR IDASC SENSOR Lab.
    Motta, Nunzio
    School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology.
    Faglia, Guido
    University of Brescia, CNR IDASC SENSOR Lab.
    Sberveglieri, Giorgio
    SENSOR Lab, Department of Information Engineering, University of Brescia.
    Functionalised zinc oxide nanowire gas sensors: Enhanced NO 2 gas sensor response by chemical modification of nanowire surfaces2012In: Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology, ISSN 2190-4286, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 368-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface coating with an organic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) can enhance surface reactions or the absorption of specific gases and hence improve the response of a metal oxide (MOx) sensor toward particular target gases in the environment. In this study the effect of an adsorbed organic layer on the dynamic response of zinc oxide nanowire gas sensors was investigated. The effect of ZnO surface functionalisation by two different organic molecules, tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (THMA) and dodecanethiol (DT), was studied. The response towards ammonia, nitrous oxide and nitrogen dioxide was investigated for three sensor configurations, namely pure ZnO nanowires, organic-coated ZnO nanowires and ZnO nanowires covered with a sparse layer of organic-coated ZnO nanoparticles. Exposure of the nanowire sensors to the oxidising gas NO 2 produced a significant and reproducible response. ZnO and THMA-coated ZnO nanowire sensors both readily detected NO 2 down to a concentration in the very low ppm range. Notably, the THMA-coated nanowires consistently displayed a small, enhanced response to NO 2 compared to uncoated ZnO nanowire sensors. At the lower concentration levels tested, ZnO nanowire sensors that were coated with THMA-capped ZnO nanoparticles were found to exhibit the greatest enhanced response. ΔR/R was two times greater than that for the as-prepared ZnO nanowire sensors. It is proposed that the ΔR/R enhancement in this case originates from the changes induced in the depletion-layer width of the ZnO nanoparticles that bridge ZnO nanowires resulting from THMA ligand binding to the surface of the particle coating. The heightened response and selectivity to the NO 2 target are positive results arising from the coating of these ZnO nanowire sensors with organic-SAM-functionalised ZnO nanoparticles.

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