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  • 1.
    Crowe, Jacob D.
    et al.
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
    Zarger, Rachael A.
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
    Hodge, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering. Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University; DOE-Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, and Department of Biosystems & Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University.
    Relating nanoscale accessibility within plant cell walls to improved enzyme hydrolysis yields in corn stover subjected to diverse pretreatments2017In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 65, no 39, p. 8652-8662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simultaneous chemical modification and physical reorganization of plant cell walls via alkaline hydrogen peroxide or liquid hot water pretreatment can alter cell wall structural properties impacting nanoscale porosity. Nanoscale porosity was characterized using solute exclusion to assess accessible pore volumes, water retention value as a proxy for accessible water-cell walls surface area, and solute-induced cell wall swelling to measure cell wall rigidity. Key findings concluded that delignification by alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment decreased cell wall rigidity and that the subsequent cell wall swelling resulted increased nanoscale porosity and improved enzyme binding and hydrolysis compared to limited swelling and increased accessible surface areas observed in liquid hot water pretreated biomass. The volume accessible to a 90 Å dextran probe within the cell wall was found to be correlated to both enzyme binding and glucose hydrolysis yields, indicating cell wall porosity is a key contributor to effective hydrolysis yields.

  • 2.
    Enman, Josefine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Hodge, David
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Production of the bioactive compound eritadenine by submerged cultivation of shiitake (Lentinus edodes) mycelia2008In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 56, no 8, p. 2609-2612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fruit bodies and mycelia of shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes) have been shown to contain the cholesterol-reducing compound eritadenine, 2(R),3(R)-dihydroxy-4-(9-adenyl)butyric acid. In the search for a production method for eritadenine, shiitake mycelia were investigated in the present study. The mycelia were cultivated both in shake flasks and in bioreactors, to investigate the effects of pH, stirring rate, and reactor type on the production and distribution of eritadenine. Both the biomass and the culture broth were examined for their eritadenine content. In the shake flasks, the final concentration of eritadenine was 1.76 mg/L and eritadenine was equally distributed between the mycelia and the growth media. In the bioreactors, the shiitake mycelia were found to contain eritadenine in relatively low levels, whereas the majority, 90.6-98.9%, was detected in the growth media. Applying a stirring rate of 250 rpm during bioreactor cultivation resulted in the highest eritadenine concentrations: 10.23 mg/L when the pH was uncontrolled and 9.59 mg/L when the pH was controlled at 5.7. Reducing the stirring rate to 50 rpm resulted in a decreased eritadenine concentration, both at pH 5.7 (5.25 mg/L) and when pH was not controlled (5.50 mg/L). The mycelia in the shake flask cultures appeared as macroscopic aggregates, whereas mycelia cultivated in bioreactors grew more as freely dispersed filaments. This study demonstrates for the first time the extra- and intracellular distribution of eritadenine produced by shiitake mycelial culture and the influence of reactor conditions on the mycelial morphology and eritadenine concentrations.

  • 3.
    Enman, Josefine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Berglund, Kris A.
    Quantification of the bioactive compound eritadenine in selected strains of shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes)2007In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 1177-1180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the most common causes of death in the Western world, and a high level of blood cholesterol is considered a risk factor. The edible fungus, shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes), contains the hypocholesterolemic agent eritadenine, 2(R),3(R)-dihydroxy-4-(9-adenyl)-butyric acid. This study was conducted to quantify the amount of the cholesterol reducing agent eritadenine in shiitake mushrooms, in search of a potential natural medicine against blood cholesterol. The amounts of eritadenine in the fruit bodies of four different shiitake mushrooms, Le-1, Le-2, Le-A, and Le-B, were investigated in this study. To achieve this goal, methanol extraction was used to recover as much as possible of the hypocholesterolemic agent from the fungal cells. In addition, enzymes that degrade the fungal cell walls were also used to elucidate if the extraction could be further enhanced. To analyze the target compound, a reliable and reproducible HPLC method for separation, identification, and quantification of eritadenine was developed. The shiitake strains under investigation exhibit up to 10 times higher levels of eritadenine than previously reported for other shiitake strains. Further, pretreating the mushrooms with hydrolytic enzymes before methanol extraction resulted in an insignificant increase in the amount of eritadenine released. These results indicate the potential for delivery of therapeutic amounts of eritadenine from the ingestion of extracts or dried concentrates of shiitake mushroom strains.

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