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  • 1.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    et al.
    Lund University, Section of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University.
    Wass, Malin
    Department of Psychology, University of Linköping.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Section of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Department of Psychology, University of Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Section of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University.
    The relationship between reading Comprehension, Working memory and language in children with cochlear implants2007In: Acta Neuropsychologica, ISSN 1730-7503, E-ISSN 2084-4298, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 163-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Working memory, language, and reading comprehension are strongly associated in children with severe and profound hearing impairment treated by cochlear implants (CI). In this study we explore this relationship in sixteen Swedish children with CI. We found that over 60% of the children with CI performed at the level of their hearing peers in a reading comprehension test. Demographic factors were not predictive of reading comprehension, but a complex working memory task was. Reading percentile was significantly correlated to the working memory test, but no other correlations between reading and cognitive/linguistic factors remained significant after age was factored out. Individual results from a comparison of the two best and the two poorest readers corroborate group results, confirming the important role of working memory for reading as measured by comprehension of words and sentences in this group of children.

  • 2.
    Wass, Malin
    et al.
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping and the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Department of Psychology, University of Linköping, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping and the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Lund University.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    Lund University, Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Lund University.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Section of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina Margareetta
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Lund University, Department of Otolaryngology, Section of Audiology, Linköping University Hospital.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Technical Audiology, Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Technical Audiology, Linköping University.
    Reading strategies and cognitive skills in children with cochlear implants2010In: Acta Neuropsychologica, ISSN 1730-7503, E-ISSN 2084-4298, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 142-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The present study investigated working memory capacity, lexical access, phonological skills and reading ability in 6 children with cochlear implants (CI), attending grades 1-3. For each test measure, the individual performance of the children was compared to a grade-matched comparison group of children with normal hearing. Performance was also studied in relation to demographic factors. Material/Methods: Cognitive skills were assessed in a computer-based test battery. Different aspects of each of the component skills were tapped in various subtests. Reading comprehension was measured by the Woodcock Reading Mastery Test and decoding was assessed in the Test of Word Reading (TOWRE). The children were also tested on orthographic learning. Results: These children with CI have specific difficulties in tasks of phonological skills and phonological working memory (WM) where nonwords are used as test stimuli. They do not seem to have problems with phonological processing of words for which they have a well defined phonological representation. They also experienced relatively more difficulties in tasks on lexical access without any contextual information. Conclusions: We suggest that children with CI are particularly efficient in using compensatory strategies in situations where their auditory perception does not provide sufficient information to correctly match the incoming speech signal to a corresponding representation in longterm phonological storage. The children with CI in this study were skilled readers, both for decoding of words and nonwords and for reading comprehension. They may use both orthographic and phonological reading strategies, although most of them seem to be dependent on phonological decoding to some extent.

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