Change search
Refine search result
1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Attree, N.
    et al.
    Earth and Planetary Observation Centre, Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, UK.
    Patel, N.
    School of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK.
    Hagermann, A.
    Earth and Planetary Observation Centre, Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, UK; School of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK.
    Grott, M.
    DLR Institute for Planetary Research, Berlin, Germany.
    Spohn, T.
    DLR Institute for Planetary Research, Berlin, Germany.
    Siegler, M.
    Deadman College of Humanities and Sciences, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, USA.
    Potential effects of atmospheric collapse on Martian heat flow and application to the InSight measurements2020In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 180, article id 104778Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Carlsson, Ella
    Mars Express and Venus Express multi-point observations of geoeffective solar flare events in December 20062008In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 56, p. 873-880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In December 2006, a single active region produced a series of proton solar flares, with X-ray class up to the X9.0 level, starting on 5December 2006 at 10:35 UT. A feature of this X9.0 flare is that associated MeV particles were observed at Venus and Mars by VenusExpress (VEX) and Mars Express (MEX), which were 801 and 1251 east of the flare site, respectively, in addition to the Earth, whichwas 791 west of the flare site. On December 5, 2006, the plasma instruments ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4 on board MEX and VEXdetected a large enhancement in their respective background count levels. This is a typical signature of solar energetic particle (SEP)events, i.e., intensive MeV particle fluxes. The timings of these enhancements were consistent with the estimated field-aligned travel timeof particles associated with the X9.0 flare that followed the Parker spiral to reach Venus and Mars. Coronal mass ejection (CME)

  • 3. Carlsson, Ella
    et al.
    Brain, D.
    Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley.
    Luhmann, J.
    Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley.
    Barabash, Stas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Grigoriev, Alexander
    Nilsson, H.
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik.
    Lundin, R.
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik.
    Influence of IMF draping direction and crustal magnetic field location on Martian ion beams2008In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 56, no 6, p. 861-867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data from the Ion Mass Analyzer (IMA) sensor of the ASPERA-3 instrument suite onboard Mars Express and data from the Magnetometer/Electron Reflectometer (MAG/ER) on Mars Global Surveyor have been analyzed to determine whether ion beam events (IBEs) are correlated with the direction of the draped interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) or the proximity of strong crustal magnetic fields to the subsolar point. We examined 150 IBEs and found that they are organized by IMF draping direction. However, no clear dependence on the subsolar longitude of the strongest magnetic anomaly is evident, making it uncertain whether crustal magnetic fields have an effect on the formation of the beams. We also examined data from the IMA sensor of the ASPERA-4 instrument suite on Venus Express and found that IBEs are observed at Venus as well, which indicates the morphology of the Martian and Venusian magnetotails are similar.

  • 4.
    Escamilla-Roa, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR).
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR).
    Sainz-Díaz, C. Ignacio
    Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR).
    Adsorption of methane and CO2 onto olivine surfaces in Martian dust conditions2018In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 153, p. 163-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methane has been detected on all planets of our Solar System, and most of the larger moons, as well as in dwarf-planets like Pluto and Eric. The presence of this molecule in rocky planets is very interesting because its presence in the Earth's atmosphere is mainly related to biotic processes. Space instrumentation in orbiters around Mars has detected olivine on the Martian soil and dust. On the other hand the measurements of methane from the Curiosity rover report detection of background levels of atmospheric methane with abundance that is lower than model estimates of ultraviolet degradation of accreted interplanetary dust particles or carbonaceous chondrite material. Additionally, elevated levels of methane about this background have been observed implying that Mars is episodically producing methane from an additional unknown source, making the reasons of these temporal fluctuations of methane a hot topic in planetary research. The goal of this study is to investigate at atomic level the interactions during the adsorption processes of methane and other Mars atmospheric species (CO2, H2O) on forsterite surfaces, through electronic structure calculations based on the Density Functional Theory (DFT). We propose two models to simulate the interaction of adsorbates with the surface of dust mineral, such as binary mixtures (5CH4+5H2O/5CH4+5CO2) and as a semi-clathrate adsorption. We have obtained interesting results of the adsorption process in the mixture 5CH4+5CO2. Associative and dissociative adsorptions were observed for water and CO2 molecules. The methane molecules were only trapped and held by water or CO2 molecules. In the dipolar surface, the adsorption of CO2 molecules produced new species: one CO from a CO2 dissociation, and, two CO2 molecules chemisorbed to mineral surface forming a carbonate group. Our results suggest that CO2 has a strong interaction with the mineral surface when methane is present. These results could be confirmed after the analysis of the data from the upcoming remote and in-situ observations on Mars, as those to be performed by instruments on the ESA's ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter and ExoMars rover.

  • 5.
    Escamilla-Roa, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Zorzano, María-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Centro de Astrobiología (INTA-CSIC), Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid, Spain.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR), Granada, Spain.
    Hernäandez-Laguna, Alfonso
    Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR), Granada, Spain.
    Sainz-Diaz, Claro
    Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR), Granada, Spain.
    DFT study of electronic and redox properties of TiO2 supported on olivine for modelling regolith on Moon and Mars conditions2020In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 180, article id 104760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Titanium dioxide TiO2 is one of the most studied oxides in photocatalysis, due to its electronic structure and its wide variety of applications, such as gas sensors and biomaterials, and especially in methane-reforming catalysis. Titanium dioxide and olivine have been detected both on Mars and our Moon. It has been postulated that on Mars photocatalytic processes may be relevant for atmospheric methane fluctuation, radicals and perchlorate productions etc. However, to date no investigation has been devoted to modelling the properties of TiO2 adsorbed on olivine surface.

    The goal of this study is to investigate at atomic level with electronic structure calculations based on the Density Functional Theory (DFT), the atomic interactions that take place during the adsorption processes for formation of a TiO regolith. This model is formed with different TiO films adsorbed on olivine (forsterite) surfaces, one of the most common minerals in Universe, Earth, Mars, cometary and interstellar dust. We propose three regolith models to simulate the principal phase of titanium oxide (TiO, Ti2O3 and TiO2). The models show different adsorption processes i.e. physisorption and chemisorption. Our results suggest that the TiO is the most reactive phase and produces a strong exothermic effect. Besides, we have detailed, from a theoretical point of view, the effect that has the adsorption process in the electronic properties such as electronic density of state (DOS) and oxide reduction process (redox). This theoretical study can be important to understand the formation of new materials (supports) that can be used as support in the catalytic processes that occur in the Earth, Mars and Moon. Also, it may be important to interpret the present day photochemistry and interaction of regolith and airborne aerosols in the atmosphere on Mars or to define possible catalytic reactions of the volatiles captured on the Moon regolith.

  • 6.
    Fleith, Patrick
    et al.
    European Astronaut Centre (ESA/EAC), Cologne, Germany; ISAE-SUPAERO, Toulouse, France.
    Cowley, Aidan
    European Astronaut Centre (ESA/EAC), Cologne, Germany.
    Canals Pou, Alberto
    European Astronaut Centre (ESA/EAC), Cologne, Germany; Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy (CMEM), ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Barcelona, Spain.
    Valle Lozano, Aaron
    Luleå University of Technology. European Astronaut Centre (ESA/EAC), Linder Hoehe, D-51147, Cologne, Germany; Université Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier, Route de Narbonne, 31330, Toulouse, France.
    Frank, Rebecca
    European Astronaut Centre (ESA/EAC), Cologne, Germany.
    López Córdoba, Pablo
    European Astronaut Centre (ESA/EAC), Cologne, Germany; UPC Escola d’Enginyeria de Telecomunicació i Aeroespacial, Casteldefels, Barcelona, Spain.
    González-Cinca, Ricard
    Department of Physics, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya-BarcelonaTech, Castelldefels (Barcelona), Spain.
    In-situ approach for thermal energy storage and thermoelectricity generation on the Moon: Modelling and simulation2020In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 181, article id 104789Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human, tele-operated rovers, and surface infrastructures are now being actively considered for lunar polar exploration. Current approaches to energy provision consider, among others, hybrid direct energy/chemical technologies, such as solar photovoltaic arrays, batteries, and regenerative fuel cells. Due to the long period of darkness on the Moon and the challenges this poses to the aforementioned conventional energy generation and storage technologies, there is a need to assess the potential of In-Situ Resources Utilization (ISRU) methods to enable or supplement long duration missions. We present a computational model (MATLAB) of a Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system coupled to drive a heat engine (Thermoelectric Generator) to produce electricity. The TES medium designed is based off processed lunar regolith, an abundant material present on the surface of the Moon. The architecture has been optimized to provide a minimum electrical power of 36 W per unit after 66 h of polar night, but the modular nature of the model allows other ranges of parameter to be simulated. A trade-off between this ISRU-based concept and conventional approaches for energy production and storage was performed and ranked TES and thermoelectricity generation as the least appropriate option. This result is valuable in a period of enthusiasm towards ISRU. It shows that processes exploiting extraterrestrial materials instead of Earth supplies are not systematically attractive. Despite the non-favorable performances for the proposed concept, some perspectives for the TES system are given as well as potential model improvements such as the need to assess the use of a Stirling heat engine.

  • 7.
    Hao, Jingyan
    Planetary Sciences and Remote Sensing Group, Institute of Geological Sciences, Freie Universität Berlin, Malteserstr. 74-100, 12249, Berlin, Germany.
    Variability of spider spatial configuration at the Martian south pole2020In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 185, article id 104848Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Jiménez, Carlos
    et al.
    Laboratoire d'Etudes du Rayonnement et de la Matiére en Astrophysique, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Avenue de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris, France.
    Gulkis, Samuel
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 169-506, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA.
    Beaudin, Gérard
    Laboratoire d'Etudes du Rayonnement et de la Matiére en Astrophysique, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Avenue de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris, France.
    Encrenaz, T.
    Laboratoire d'Etudes du Rayonnement et de la Matiére en Astrophysique, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Avenue de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris, France.
    Eriksson, Patrick
    Department of Earth and Space Science, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kamp, Lucas
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 169-506, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA.
    Lee, S.
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 169-506, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA.
    Buehler, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Sub-millimeter observations of the terrestrial atmosphere during an Earth flyby of the MIRO sounder on the Rosetta spacecraft2013In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 82-83, p. 99-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sub-millimeter spectra recorded by the MIRO sounder aboard the Rosetta spacecraft have been used at the time of an Earth flyby (November 2007) to check the consistency and validity of the instrumental data. High-resolution spectroscopic data were recorded in 8 channels in the vicinity of the strong water line at 557 GHz, and in a broad band continuum channel at 570 GHz. An atmospheric radiative transfer code (ARTS) and standard terrestrial atmospheres have been used to simulate the expected observational results. Differences with the MIRO spectra suggest an anomaly in the behavior of four spectroscopic channels. Further technical investigations have shown that a large part of the anomalies are associated with an instability of one of the amplifiers. The quality of the MIRO data has been further tested by inverting the spectra with an atmospheric inversion tool (Qpack) in order to derive a mesospheric temperature profile. The retrieved profile is in good agreement with the one inferred from the Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS-MLS). This work illustrates the interest of validating instruments aboard planetary or cometary spacecraft by using data acquired during Earth flybys.

  • 9.
    Kasai, Yasuko
    et al.
    National Institute of Information and Communication Technology, Tokyo.
    Sagawa, Hideo
    National Institute of Information and Communication Technology, Tokyo.
    Kuroda, Takeshi
    Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Chuoku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa.
    Manabe, Takeshi
    Osaka Prefecture University, Naka, Sakai.
    Ochiai, Satoshi
    National Institute of Information and Communication Technology, Tokyo.
    Kikuchi, Ken–ichi
    National Institute of Information and Comunications Technology, Koganei, Tokyo.
    Nishibori, Toshiyuki
    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.
    Baron, Philippe
    National Institute of Information and Communication Technology, Tokyo.
    Mendrok, Jana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Hartogh, Paul
    Max-Planck-Institut für Solar System Research.
    Murtagh, Donal
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Urban, Joachim
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    von Schéele, Fredrik
    Swedish Space Corporation.
    Frisk, Urban
    Swedish Space Corporation.
    Overview of the Martian atmospheric submillimetre sounder FIRE2012In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 63-64, p. 62-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a submillimetre-wave atmospheric emission sounding instrument, called Far-InfraRed Experiment (FIRE), for the Japanese Martian exploration programme Mars Exploration with Lander-Orbiter Synergy (MELOS). The scientific target of FIRE/MELOS is to understand the dust suspended meteorology of the Mars. FIRE will provide key meteorological parameters, such as atmospheric temperature profiles for outside and inside dust storms, the abundance profile of the atmospheric compositions and their isotopes, and wind velocity profiles. FIRE will also provide the local time dependency of these parameters. The observational sensitivity of FIRE/MELOS is discussed in this paper. FIRE will explore the meteorological system of the Martian atmosphere including the interaction between its surface and atmosphere

  • 10.
    Kastinen, D.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering. Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF), Kiruna, Sweden.
    Kero, J.
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF), Kiruna, Sweden.
    A Monte Carlo-type simulation toolbox for Solar System small body dynamics: Application to the October Draconids2017In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 143, no SI, p. 53-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the current status and first results from a Monte Carlo-type simulation toolbox for Solar System small body dynamics. We also present fundamental methods for evaluating the results of this type of simulations using convergence criteria. The calculations consider a body in the Solar System with a mass loss mechanism that generates smaller particles. In our application the body, or parent body, is a comet and the mass loss mechanism is a sublimation process. In order to study mass propagation from parent bodies to Earth, we use the toolbox to sample the uncertainty distributions of relevant comet parameters and to find the resulting Earth influx distributions. The initial distributions considered represent orbital elements, sublimation distance, cometary and meteoroid densities, comet and meteoroid sizes and cometary surface activity. Simulations include perturbations from all major planets, radiation pressure and the Poynting-Robertson effect. In this paper we present the results of an initial software validation performed by producing synthetic versions of the 1933, 1946, 2011 and 2012 October Draconids meteor outbursts and comparing them with observational data and previous models. The synthetic meteor showers were generated by ejecting and propagating material from the recognized parent body of the October Draconids; the comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner. Material was ejected during 17 perihelion passages between 1866 and 1972. Each perihelion passage was sampled with 50 clones of the parent body, all producing meteoroid streams. The clones were drawn from a multidimensional Gaussian distribution on the orbital elements, with distribution variances proportional to observational uncertainties. In the simulations, each clone ejected 8000 particles. Each particle was assigned an individual weight proportional to the mass loss it represented. This generated a total of 6.7 million test particles, out of which 43 thousand entered the Earth's Hill sphere during 1900–2020 and were considered encounters. The simulation reproduces the predictions and observations of the 1933, 1946, 2011 and 2012 October Draconids, including the unexpected but measured deviation of the meteoroid mass index from a power law in 2012 as compared to 2011. We show that when convergence is sufficient in the simulation, the fraction between two encountered mass distributions is independent of the assumed input mass distribution. Finally, we predict an outburst for the 2018 October Draconids with a peak on October 8–9 that could be up to twice as large as the 2011 and 2012 outbursts.

  • 11. Kömle, N. I.
    et al.
    Hütter, E. S.
    Macher, W.
    Kaufmann, Erika
    Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria.
    Kargl, G.
    Knollenberg, J.
    Grott, M.
    Spohn, T.
    Wawrzaszek, R.
    Banaszkiewicz, M.
    Seweryn, K.
    Hagermann, Axel
    Centre for Earth, Planetary, Space and Astronomical Research (CEPSAR), Open University, Milton Keynes, UK.
    In situ methods for measuring thermal properties and heat flux on planetary bodies2011In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 59, no 8, p. 639-660Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Larsson, Richard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    McKay, Christopher
    NASA Ames Research Center.
    Timescale for oceans in the past of Titan2013In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, p. 22-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We estimate the past extent of liquid on the surface of Titan as a function of time assuming the current rate of destruction of methane and no sources or subsurface sinks. As methane increases for increasing past time the polar lakes expand equatorward. We use a spherical harmonics model for the surface topography to compute the fraction of the surface covered as the methane inventory increases. We find that substantial parts of the equator would have been flooded by a polar ocean 300 million years ago and that the equator would have been connected to a global ocean 600 million years ago. This provides one possible explanation for the fluvial features seen at the equator on Titan.

  • 13.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR), 18100, Granada, Spain.
    Zorzano, Maria-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850, Madrid, Spain.
    Soria-Salinas, Álvaro
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Israel Nazarious, Miracle
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Konatham, Samuel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Mathanlal, Thasshwin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Vakkada Ramachandran, Abhilash
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Ramírez-Luque, Juan-Antonio
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Mantas-Nakhai, Roberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    The HABIT (HabitAbility: Brine Irradiation and Temperature) environmental instrument for the ExoMars 2022 Surface Platform2020In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 190, article id 104968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The HABIT (HabitAbility: Brine Irradiation and Temperature) instrument is a European payload of the ExoMars 2022 Surface Platform Kazachok that will characterize the present-day habitability at its landing place in Oxia Planum, Mars. HABIT consists of two modules: (i) EnvPack (Environmental Package) that monitors the thermal environment (air and ground), the incident ultraviolet radiation, the near surface winds and the atmospheric dust cycle; and (ii) BOTTLE (Brine Observation Transition To Liquid Experiment), an In-situ Resource Utilization instrument to produce liquid water for future Mars exploration. BOTTLE will be used also to investigate the electrical conductivity properties of the martian atmosphere, the present-day atmospheric-ground water cycle and to evaluate if liquid water can exist on Mars in the form of brines, and for how long. These variables measured by HABIT are critical to determine the present and future habitability of the martian surface. In this paper, we describe in detail the HABIT instrument and sensors, together with the calibration of its Flight Model (FM) and the Engineering Qualification Model (EQM) versions. The EnvPack module has heritage from previous missions operating on the surface of Mars, and the environmental observations of its sensors will be directly comparable to those delivered by those missions. HABIT can provide information of the local temperature with ±0.2 °C accuracy, local winds with ±0.3 m/s, surface brightness temperature with ±0.8 °C, incident UV irradiance with 10% error of its absolute value in the UV-A, UV-B, UV-C ranges, as well as in the total UV-ABC range, and two additional wavebands, dedicated to ozone absorption. The UV observations can be used to derive the total opacity column and thus monitor the dust and ozone cycles. BOTTLE can demonstrate the hydration state of a set of four deliquescent salts, which have been found on Mars (calcium chloride, ferric sulphate, magnesium perchlorate and sodium perchlorate) by monitoring their electric conductivity (EC). The EC of the air and the dry salts under Earth ambient, clean room conditions is of the order of 0.1 μScm−1. We have simulated HABIT operations, within an environmental chamber, under martian conditions similar to those expected at Oxia Planum. For dry, CO2 atmospheric conditions at martian pressures, the air EC can be as low as 10−8 μScm−1, however it increases with the relative humidity (RH) percentage. The laboratory experiments show that after an increase from 0 to 60% RH within a few hours, the EC of the air increased up to 10−1 μScm−1, magnesium perchlorate hydrated and reached values of 10 μScm-1, whereas calcium chloride deliquesced forming a liquid state with EC of 102 μScm−1. HABIT will operate with a regular cadence, through day and night. The Electronic Unit (EU) is protected with a heater that is activated when its temperature is below −33 °C and disabled if the temperature of the surface platform rises above −30 °C. Additionally, the heaters of the BOTTLE unit can be activated to dehydrate the salts and reset the experiment. HABIT weighs only 918 g. Its power consumption depends on the operation mode and internal temperature, and it varies between 0.7 W, for nominal operation, and 13.1 W (when heaters are turned on at full intensity). HABIT has a baseline data rate of 1.5 MB/sol. In addition to providing critical environmental observations, this light and robust instrument, will be the first demonstrator of a water capturing system on the surface of Mars, and the first European In-Situ Resource Utilization in the surface of another planet.

  • 14.
    McKay, C. P.
    et al.
    NASA Ames Research Center, United States.
    Khare, B. N.
    NASA Ames Research Center, United States.
    Amin, R.
    Luleå University of Technology. NASA Ames Research Center, United States.
    Klasson, M.
    Luleå University of Technology. NASA Ames Research Center, United States.
    Kral, T. A.
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Arkansas, United States.
    Possible sources for methane and C 2-C 5 organics in the plume of Enceladus2012In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 73-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider six possible sources of CH 4 and other lowmass (C 2-C 5) organics in the plume of Enceladus: three of these sources represent initial endowments of organics: cometary organics, Titan-like tholin, and the Fisher-Tropsch type reactions in the gases from which Enceladus formed. The other three sources represent processes inside Enceladus: water-rock reactions, microbiology, and thermogenesis. We report on new laboratory results for C 2 hydrocarbons released by thermogenesis of laboratory tholin and the Fisher-Tropsch type synthesis. Thermal processing of Titan-like tholin produced ratios of CH 4/C 2H 4 and CH 4/C 2H 6 of about two for temperatures up to 450 °C and about six for a temperature of 650°C. The low pressure (∼1 atm) Fisher-Tropsch type experiments produced CH 4/C 2H 4 of ∼1.5, similar to previous results. C 2H 2 was not produced by either process. Tests of gas production by four strains of methanogens confirmed the absence of any detectable production of non-methane hydrocarbons. Cometary endowment, the Fisher-Tropsch type synthesis, and Titan-like tholin incorporation could be primary inputs of organics and subsequent thermal processing of any of these all are possible sources of low mass organics in the plume. Biological production and water-rock reactions are an alternative source of CH 4. Aqueous reactions with CO and H 2 can produce C 2-C 5 organics even at the low pressures of the interior of Enceladus. If there is a confirmed detection of CO and C 2H 2 in the plume of Enceladus, this provides an important constraint on sources, as we have identified no process, other than the initial volatile component of cometary organics, which can supply these gases. Precise determination of the relative concentrations of C 1-C 5 hydrocarbons may provide additional constraints on sources, but a detailed isotopic analysis of C and H in these organics and a search for amino acids constitute the next important steps in resolving the sources of the organics in Enceladus' plume.

  • 15.
    Michikami, T.
    et al.
    Faculty of Engineering, Kindai University, Hiroshima Campus, 1 Takaya Umenobe, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima, 739-2116, Japan.
    Hagermann, A.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, FK9 4LA, United Kingdom.
    Tsuchiyama, A.
    Research Organization of Science and Technology, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577, Japan; Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehua Street, Wushan, Tianhe District, Guangzhou, 510640, China.
    Yamaguchi, H.
    Division of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8052, Japan.
    Irie, T.
    Faculty of Engineering, Kindai University, Hiroshima Campus, 1 Takaya Umenobe, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima, 739-2116, Japan.
    Nomura, K.
    Faculty of Engineering, Kindai University, Hiroshima Campus, 1 Takaya Umenobe, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima, 739-2116, Japan.
    Sasaki, O.
    Division of GeoEnvironmental Science, Department of Earth Science, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8578, Japan.
    Nakamura, M.
    Department of Earth Science, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8578, Japan.
    Okumura, S.
    Department of Earth Science, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8578, Japan.
    Hasegawa, S.
    Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-8510, Japan.
    Three-dimensional imaging of crack growth in L chondrites after high-velocity impact experiments2019In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 177, article id 104690Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Treffer, Melanie
    et al.
    Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Schmiedlstrasse 6, A-8042 Graz, Austria.
    Kömle, Norbert I.
    Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Schmiedlstrasse 6, A-8042 Graz, Austria.
    Kargl, Günter
    Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Schmiedlstrasse 6, A-8042 Graz, Austria.
    Kaufmann, Erika
    Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Schmiedlstrasse 6, A-8042 Graz, Austria.
    Ulamec, Stephan
    DLR Institut für Raumsimulation, Porz-Wahnheide, Linder Höhe, D-51147 Köln, Germany.
    Biele, Jens
    DLR Institut für Raumsimulation, Porz-Wahnheide, Linder Höhe, D-51147 Köln, Germany.
    Ivanov, Alexander
    DLR Institut für Raumsimulation, Porz-Wahnheide, Linder Höhe, D-51147 Köln, Germany.
    Funke, Oliver
    DLR Institut für Raumsimulation, Porz-Wahnheide, Linder Höhe, D-51147 Köln, Germany.
    Preliminary studies concerning subsurface probes for the exploration of icy planetary bodies2006In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 621-634Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Trigo-Rodriguez, Josep Ma
    et al.
    Institute of Space Sciences- CSIC, Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciències, Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC).
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Centro de Astrobiologia, INTA-CSIC, Madrid.
    Clues on the importance of comets in the origin and evolution of the atmospheres of Titan and Earth2012In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 3-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earth and Titan are two planetary bodies formed far from each other. Nevertheless the chemical composition of their atmospheres exhibits common indications of being produced by the accretion, plus ulterior in-situ processing of cometary materials. This is remarkable because while the Earth formed in the inner part of the disk, presumably from the accretion of rocky planetesimals depleted in oxygen and exhibiting a chemical similitude with enstatite chondrites, Titan formed within Saturns sub-nebula from oxygen- and volatile-rich bodies, called cometesimals. From a cosmochemical and astrobiological perspective, the study of the H, C, N, and O isotopes on Earth and Titan could be the key to decipher the processes occurred in the early stages of formation of both planetary bodies. The main goal of this paper is to quantify the presumable ways of chemical evolution of both planetary bodies, in particular the abundance of CO and N 2 in their early atmospheres. In order to do that the primeval atmospheres and evolution of Titan and Earth have been analyzed from a thermodynamic point of view. The most relevant chemical reactions involving these species and presumably important at their early stages are discussed. Then, we have interpreted the results of this study in light of the results obtained by the Cassini-Huygens mission on these species and their isotopes. Given that H, C, N, and O were preferentially depleted from inner disk materials that formed our planet, the observed similitude of their isotopic fractionation, and subsequent close evolution of Earths and Titans atmospheres points towards a cometary origin of Earth atmosphere. Consequently, our scenario also supports the key role of late veneers (comets and water-rich carbonaceous asteroids) enriching the volatile content of the Earth at the time of the late heavy bombardment of terrestrial planets. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Tsirvoulis, Georgios
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Granvik, Mikael
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Department of Physics, PO Box 64, 00014, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Toliou, Athanasia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    SHINeS: Space and High-Irradiance Near-Sun Simulator2022In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 217, article id 105490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present SHINeS, a space simulator which can be used to replicate the thermal environment in the immediate neighborhood of the Sun down to a heliocentric distance r ∼ 0.06 au. The system consists of three main parts: the solar simulator which was designed and constructed in-house, a vacuum chamber, and the probing and recording equipment needed to monitor the experimental procedures. Our motivation for building this experimental system was to study the effect of intense solar radiation on the surfaces of asteroids when their perihelion distances become smaller than the semi-major axis of the orbit of Mercury. Comparisons between observational data and recent orbit and size-frequency models of the population of near-Earth asteroids suggest that asteroids are super-catastrophically destroyed when they approach the Sun. Whereas the current models are agnostic about the disruption mechanism, SHINeS was developed to study the mechanism or mechanisms responsible. The system can, however, be used for other applications that need to study the effects of high solar radiation on other natural or artificial objects.

  • 19.
    Weiss, P.
    et al.
    Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China.
    Yung, K.L.
    Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China.
    Ng, T.C.
    Room 1605, Medical Floor, Island Center, 1 Great George Street, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China.
    Kömle, N.
    Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria.
    Kargl, G.
    Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria.
    Kaufmann, E.
    Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria.
    Study of a thermal drill head for the exploration of subsurface planetary ice layers2008In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 56, no 9, p. 1280-1292Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Williams, K.E.
    et al.
    NASA Ames Research Center, Division of Space Sciences and Astrobiology, Mail Stop 245-3, Moffett Field, CA.
    McKay, Christopher P.
    NASA Ames Research Center, Division of Space Sciences and Astrobiology, Mail Stop 245-3, Moffett Field, CA.
    Persson, Fredrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    The surface energy balance at the Huygens landing site and the moist surface conditions on Titan2012In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 376-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Huygens Probe provided a wealth of data concerning the atmosphere of Titan. It also provided tantalizing evidence of a small amount of surface liquid. We have developed a detailed surface energy balance for the Probe landing site. We find that the daily averaged non-radiative fluxes at the surface are 0.7 W m -2, much larger than the global average value predicted by McKay et al. (1991) of 0.037 W m -2. Considering the moist surface, the methane and ethane detected by the Probe from the surface is consistent with a ternary liquid of ethane, methane, and nitrogen present on the surface with mole fractions of methane, ethane, and nitrogen of 0.44, 0.34, and 0.22, respectively, and a total mass load of ∼0.05 kg m -2. If this liquid is included in the surface energy balance, only a small fraction of the non-radiative energy is due to latent heat release (∼10 -3 W m -2). If the amount of atmospheric ethane is less than 0.6×10 -5, the surface liquid is most likely evaporating over timescales of 5 Titan days, and the moist surface is probably a remnant of a recent precipitation event. If the surface liquid mass loading is increased to 0.5 kg m -2, then the liquid lifetime increases to ∼56 Titan days. Our modeling results indicate a dew cycle is unlikely, given that even when the diurnal variation of liquid is in equilibrium, the diurnal mass variation is only 3% of the total liquid. If we assume a high atmospheric mixing ratio of ethane (>0.6×10 -5), the precipitation of liquid is large (38 cm/Titan year for an ethane mixing ratio of 2×10 -5). Such a flux is many orders of magnitude in excess of the photochemical production rate of ethane

1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf