Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Amofah, Lea Rastas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Maurice, Christian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH-International Groundwater Arsenic Research Group, Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH),.
    Extraction of arsenic from soils contaminated with wood preservation chemicals2010In: Soil & sediment contamination, ISSN 1532-0383, E-ISSN 1549-7887, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 142-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three soil samples contaminated by chromated zinc arsenate (CZA) or chromated copper arsenate (CCA) were investigated in a laboratory scale to study As mobilization and to identify a chemical agent that could be used in soil washing to extract arsenic. Besides high As extraction, the cost, occupational health issues and technical aspects were considered when selecting the chemical. Arsenic is strongly bound to CZA/CCA soils; only ∼50% of the tot-As was removed from water-washed soils. High Fe or Al mobilization is not necessarily indicative of high As removal from CZA/CCA soils. A high Cu/As-ratio and a large amount of soluble Ca in the soil hampered As extraction. The high ratio can be an indication of stable Cu-arsenates in soil. Calcium can react with the extraction agent or with As during extraction. Sodium hydroxide, dithionite with citrate (and oxalate) (dithionite solutions), and oxalate with citrate were the most efficient chemicals for removing As from the soils. The disadvantages of using these strong chemicals are: a high cost (oxalate with citrate); damage to equipment (dithionite solutions); an adverse impact on occupational health (dithionite solutions); or a deterioration in soil quality after extraction (NaOH and dithionite solutons). Phosphate, solutions based on NH2OH·HCl, or citrate were not efficient in mobilizing As from the soils.

  • 2.
    Karlsson, Kristin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    German, Jonas
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Norrköping.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Stormwater pond sediments: temporal trends in heavy metal concentrations and sediment removal2010In: Soil & sediment contamination, ISSN 1532-0383, E-ISSN 1549-7887, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 217-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporal trends in stormwater pond sediment quality were evaluated by conducting field sediment surveys in 1998 and 2006. A sediment removal process in 2006 was also assessed. Results show that, for both years, the sediment closest to the inlet had the lowest concentrations of metals. The results from 1998 showed no significant differences in sediment heavy metal concentrations depth while the results from 2006 showed a decreasing trend with depth. A significant difference between the two years could be seen for Cr, Cu, and Pb. The water phase in the pond showed a difference before and after the removal of sediment. The water samples after emptying showed higher concentrations of metals as a result of disturbing and re-suspending the bottom sediment. No significant difference could be found in the samples taken from the bottom sediment before the removal of the sediment and from the sediment pile formed during the removal process. The total heavy metal concentration in water exceeded the threshold limits for the selected quality guidelines and, according to soil quality guidelines, the sediment would be classified moderately serious to serious.

  • 3. Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Maurice, Christian
    Retention of metals leached from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ashes in soils2006In: Soil & sediment contamination, ISSN 1532-0383, E-ISSN 1549-7887, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 429-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Utilization of bottom ash in road construction may lead to a release of contaminants that can affect the soil of the swales constructed along these roads. Column tests were performed to evaluate the retention behavior of Cu, Cr, Zn, and Pb, originating from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash leachate, in two substrates: peat and mould (a cultural soil). A chemical sequential extraction method was used to predict the risk associated with the release of the retained elements with modifications of environmental conditions. Apart from the dissolution of organic matter (OM), ash leachate properties hindered the metal transport from peat. Mould was efficient only in removing Zn, making it a less favorable substrate for the leachate control along the roads. Readily soluble forms made up a minor fraction of the retained metals in peat, reducing the risk of metal release due to ion exchange and pH drop. Changes in redox potential might be the main cause of Zn desorption from peat as the Fe-Mn oxides were the main scavengers for this metal. Oxidation of OM would be the primary reason of Cu and Cr release, while for Pb both fractions (Fe-Mn oxides and OM) might equally contribute to the metal discharge.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf