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  • 1.
    Börjesson, Martin
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Ahlgren, Erik O.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Lundmark, Robert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Athanassiadis, Dimitris
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Biofuel futures in road transport: A modeling analysis for Sweden2014In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 32, p. 239-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    First and second generation biofuels are among few low-carbon alternatives for road transport that currently are commercially available or in an early commercialization phase. They are thus potential options for meeting climate targets in the medium term. For the case of Sweden, we investigate cost-efficient use of biofuels in road transport under system-wide CO2 reduction targets to 2050, and the effects of implementation of targets for an almost fossil-free road transport sector to 2030. We apply the bottom-up, optimization MARKAL_Sweden model, which covers the entire Swedish energy system including the transport sector. For CO2 reductions of 80% to 2050 in the Swedish energy system as a whole, the results of the main scenario show an annual growth rate for road transport biofuels of about 6% from 2010 to 2050, with biofuels accounting for 78% of road transport final energy use in 2050. The preferred biofuel choices are methanol and biomethane. When introducing additional fossil fuel phase-out policies in road transport (−80% to 2030), a doubling of the growth rate to 2030 is required and system CO2 abatement costs increases by 6% for the main scenario. Results imply that second generation biofuels, along with energy-efficient vehicle technologies such as plug-in hybrids, can be an important part of optimized system solutions meeting stringent medium-term climate targets.

  • 2.
    Löfgren, Sofia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nilsson, Kristina L.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Johansson, Charlotta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Considering landscape in strategic transport planning2018In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 65, p. 396-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The implementation of transport infrastructure plans often has significant impacts on landscapes, especially where new roads and railroads are built. Key decisions regarding the building of new transport infrastructures are often made on a strategic level, where the long-term development of a region is determined, and before the infrastructure project actually begins. In this paper we build on previous advances in Strategic Environmental Assessment theory by linking the process-related issues of the integration of these assessments in general to landscape issues in particular; we use a multiple case study of Swedish transport planning.

    Results of this study indicate that the particular planning processes we looked at failed to carry out strategic landscape assessments and integrate landscape assessments in the planning process. We conclude that this can be explained by the flawed procedure of assessing landscape, the unhelpful structuring of SEA reports and by process-related issues. The idea of applying a holistic understanding of landscape, in line with the ELC, was notably absent from the studied cases. The lack of consideration of landscape as a whole can be attributed to poor use of dissipated and fragmented knowledge about landscapes as well as weaknesses in the assessment procedure. Our results indicate that the traditions of EIA are still prevalent in the practice of SEA, despite the fact that SEA theory has moved away from EIA-based methodology to become a tool for integrating environmental concerns into decision-making and for paying close attention to strategic decision processes.

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