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  • 1. Axelsson, Karin
    et al.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Asplund, Kjell
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Relearning to eat late after a stroke by systematic nursing intervention: a case report1986In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 553-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a training programme developed by Heimlich, we have attempted to train swallowing in a 78-year-old man who had been fed by a nasogastric tube for 3 years after a stroke. The training was successful and, during a follow-up of 1 year, the patient was eating normal food. The training process is analysed as a two-level communication between the patient and his trainer; the therapeutic relationship and the training programme. The development of the patient's attitudes during training is interpreted with reference to Erikson's theory of 'eight stages of man'

  • 2.
    Engström, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Receiving power through confirmation: the meaning of close relatives for people who have been critically ill2007In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 569-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a report of a study to elucidate the meaning of close relatives for people who have been critically ill and received care in an intensive care unit. Background. Falling critically ill can bring about a difficult change in life. In previous reports such events are described as frightening experiences, and close relatives are described as an important source of support in this difficult situation. Method. A purposive sample of 10 adults, eight men and two women, narrated how they experienced their close relatives during and after the time they were critically ill. The data were collected in 2004. The interview texts were transcribed and interpreted using a phenomenological hermeneutic approach influenced by the philosophy of Ricoeur. Findings. One major theme was identified, experiencing confirmation, with six sub-themes: receiving explanations; a feeling of being understood; a feeling of safety; gaining strength and will-power; having possibilities and realizing their value. Close relatives served as tools for the person who was ill, facilitating better communication and an increased ability to do various things. Simultaneously, feelings of dependence on the close relatives were expressed. There were descriptions of loneliness and fear in the absence of close relatives and, in order to feel safe, the participants wanted their close relatives to stay near them. Conclusion. Close relatives are vital, as they are the ill person's motivation to stay alive and to continue the struggle. Their presence is of great importance for the ill person and must be facilitated by staff.

  • 3.
    Gustafsson, Silje
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Martinsson, Jesper
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Välivaara, Britt-Marie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Vikman, Irene
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Influence of self-care advice on patient satisfaction and healthcare utilization2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 8, p. 1789-1799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimThe aim of this study is to explore the influence of nurse-led self-care advice on healthcare utilization and patients' satisfaction with telephone nursing.BackgroundMany consultations in high-cost settings are for conditions that are manageable through self-care and callers with greater satisfaction with the nurse interaction are nearly four times more likely to engage in self-care.DesignCross-sectional study.MethodsQuestionnaires were sent out to 500 randomly selected callers to the Swedish Healthcare Direct in Northern Sweden during March 2014. Callers were asked about their satisfaction with the consultation, their intended actions prior to consultation, the recommendation given by the nurse and the action undertaken after the call.ResultsYoung callers and persons recommended watchful waiting or recurrence if no improvements were significantly less satisfied with their care. When calling on their own behalf, both men and women rated the severity of their symptoms equally and were advised to self-care to the same extent. Self-care advice had a constricting influence on self-reported healthcare utilization, with 66·1% of cases resulting in a lower level of care than first intended. Feeling reassured after the call was the aspect of nursing care that influenced satisfaction the most.ConclusionReceiving self-care advice rather than referral to a general practitioner influences patient satisfaction negatively. Feeling reassured after consultation is strongly related to satisfaction, which in turn has been found to increase the likelihood of engaging in self-care behaviour.

  • 4.
    Harrefors, Christina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    Using assistive technology services at differing levels of care: healthy older couples' perceptions2010In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 66, no 7, p. 1523-1532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.: The aim of the study was to describe healthy older couples' perceptions of using assistive technology services when needing assistance with care. Background.: The use of information technology-based assistive technology services in elder care has increased as a result of an increase of care performed in private homes. The use of assistive technology services in care of older people at home has been evaluated as something positive by patients, relatives and nursing staff, while as resistance to their increased use has also been noted. Method.: Twelve healthy couples, aged over 70 years, from northern Sweden were interviewed in 2005 about their perceptions of using assistive technology services in the case of being in need of assistance with personal care. Open, individual semi-structured interviews supported by written vignettes describing three levels of caring needs were used and the data analysed with content analysis. Findings.: The findings were interpreted as one main theme with three categories: Asset or threat depends on caring needs and abilities. Three categories were identified within the theme: Assistive technology services provide an opportunity; The consequences of using assistive technology services are hard to anticipate; and Fear of assistive technology services when completely dependent on care. Conclusion.: Trust and security in the care of older people who are severely ill, dependent on care and living at home should be a hallmark in using assistive technology services. Human presence is an important dimension and must be considered when developing concepts for use of assistive technology services.

  • 5. Häggström, Terttu
    et al.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Maternal thinking in dementia care1996In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 431-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carers of demented people living in a group dwelling were interviewed and observed individually and together. The aim of the study was to illuminate the thinking of pre-identified good dementia carers and to make explicit their means of understanding demented people. The tape-recorded and transcribed interviews were interpreted using a phenomenological hermeneutic method. The findings showed that these carers explicitly referred to the concept of mother, used when explaining their ability to understand demented people. They created a home-like atmosphere together with the inhabitants. The findings were interpreted metaphorically as maternal love, thinking and practice in creating an understanding relationship with the demented people they cared for. This metaphorical aptitude considered the fulfilment of life for these demented people and included partly unconscious tools that the carers used to compensate for the loss of abilities suffered by the demented people. The carers' attitudes towards the inhabitants of the ward and each other were based on respect as in a functioning family. Their ambition was interpreted as an attempt to create an atmosphere that functioned not only as an institution, but as an incubator for human lives, which had become dependent on others for their survival and the preservation of their human dignity throughout their physical existence

  • 6. Iranmanesh, Sedigheh
    et al.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    A caring relationship with persons who have cancer2009In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 1300-1308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This paper is a report of a study conducted to elucidate the meaning of a caring relationship with people with cancer.Background. A caring relationship becomes the most important focus of caregiving when treatment of the body has reached the limits where cure is no longer expected. Caring as perceived by people with cancer involves nurses having professional attitudes and skills in order to provide good care, including emotional and practical support.Methods. A phenomenological hermeneutic approach influenced by Ricoeur was used. Eight nurses working in an oncology unit in Iran were interviewed in 2007 about their experiences of caring relationships with people who have cancer.Findings. The findings were interpreted as getting involved in a mutual/demanding close relationship. Closeness demanded nurses to be present, to listen to patients, and to be compassionate. Closeness was also mutual and characterized both caregiving and receiving new insights into values in the nurses' own lives. The close relationship was at times frustrating when they were faced with situations that they could not handle and were out of their control.Conclusion. Closeness is an important foundation for caring, and acquires a special dimension in the care of people with cancer and their relatives. It derives from the personal and professional experiences of nurses in their own life stories. Nursing education should include a reflective approach in order to develop caring skills in oncology nursing that are not merely attuned to medical care.

  • 7.
    Karlsson, Eva
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Zingmark, Karin
    County Council of Norrbotten, Department of Research and Development.
    Stories about life narrated by people with Alzheimer's disease2014In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 70, no 12, p. 2791-2799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo explore how people with Alzheimer's disease present their life story.BackgroundLife story work is a key concept in a person-centred care. An important aspect in understanding the subjective experience and supporting the identity of people with dementia is to listen to their life stories.DesignA narrative design with interviews was used.MethodNine participants with Alzheimer's disease were encouraged to tell about their lives from childhood, adult life, to present life and about their thoughts on the future. The interviews were conducted between September 2010–March 2011 in the participants' homes, with their spouses present and were analysed with a method for analysis of narratives.FindingsContentment, Connectedness, Self-reliance and Personal growth were identified as core dimensions in the participants' life stories and shown like threads throughout life, from childhood, adult life to present life. All participants expressed an overall contentment with life, and connectedness was related to their relation with significant persons and to be included in the local community. Self-reliance was expressed as a strong confidence in the own ability and an overall curiosity throughout life as a sustained quest for personal growth.ConclusionsIt is important for healthcare professionals, who work with people with dementia, to understand that people with Alzheimer's disease can maintain an overall trusting and hopeful approach to life. It is also important to use life story work to enhance feelings of being connected to the world and thereby support their identity and sense of self.

  • 8.
    Löf, Susanna
    et al.
    Intensive Care Unit, Sunderby Hospital.
    Sandström, Agneta
    Intensive Care Unit, Sunderby Hospital.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest: relatives' experiences2010In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 66, no 8, p. 1523-1532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a report of a study describing the experiences of relatives when someone they care for survived a cardiac arrest and was treated with therapeutic hypothermia in an intensive care unit. Background. Witnessing a family member suffering a cardiac arrest is a traumatic event for relatives. Relatives constitute an important support for critically ill patients. It is suggested that therapeutic hypothermia improves the outcome for patients who survive cardiac arrest. Method. Qualitative personal interviews were conducted during 2009 with eight relatives of patients who had survived cardiac arrest and been treated with therapeutic hypothermia. The interview texts were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Findings. The analysis resulted in three themes and eight categories. Relatives described the event of the cardiac arrest as frightening. Seeing the patient connected to tubes and equipment induced a feeling of unreality; the patient was experienced as cold, lifeless and hard to recognize. The relatives faced an anxiety-filled future not knowing what the outcome for their relative would be. Relatives supported each other during this the difficult time, and kept hoping that the patient would survive injury.Conclusion. Seeing a patient who has had a cardiac arrest and received therapeutic hypothermia is extremely demanding for relatives, as the patient seems to be lifeless. Relatives need to know what is happening on a continualbasis during the patient's entire stay in hospital and even afterwards, and they need to be given opportunities to discuss their own situation and worries

  • 9.
    Olsson, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Lexell, Jan
    Söderberg, Siv
    The meaning of fatigue for women with multiple sclerosis2005In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 7-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper reports the findings of a study that aimed to elucidate the meaning of fatigue for women with multiple sclerosis (MS). BACKGROUND: Living with chronic illness can involve giving up usual activities. MS is a chronic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Fatigue is a common experience among people with MS; however, little is known about the meaning of fatigue experienced by women with this condition. METHOD: Ten women with MS were interviewed about their experience of fatigue. A phenomenological hermeneutic method influenced by Ricoeur was used to interpret the transcribed interviews. FINDINGS: The findings were presented in two major themes with five subthemes; experiencing the body as a barrier and experiencing a different absence. Fatigue seemed to give rise to an experience of being absent and divided into two parts. This also led to a feeling of not being able to participate in the surrounding world. The feeling of being an outsider and lacking the ability as a healthy person is interpreted as a form of suffering. Although the fatigue had a great impact on the women's daily life, the women still hoped for some relief. Fatigue seemed to imply that instead of working as an implement to manage in the world the body has become an enemy of survival. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the importance for nurses of understanding how women with MS experience fatigue, which is a prerequisite for communication based on a shared understanding. This awareness would enhance nurses' opportunities to alleviate suffering. More research is needed to investigate what kinds of interventions can help these women to manage their everyday lives and to maintain a sense of normality despite their fatigue and illness. Such interventions should be subject to empirical evaluation research.

  • 10.
    Patomella, Ann-Helöen
    et al.
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Health Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Bergland, Ådel
    Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Oslo.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing, Umeå university, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Dundee, School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria.
    Characteristics of residents who thrive in nursing home environments: a cross-sectional study2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 9, p. 2153-2161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe what characterizes residents with higher levels compared with those with lower levels of thriving in nursing homes using the Thriving of Older People Assessment Scale. Background: Thriving is conceptualized as people's experiences of well-being in relation to the environment where they live. Thriving has the potential to emphasize health-promotion and positive experiences in nursing home residents in addition to current focus on illness and symptoms. Design: Cross-sectional design. Methods: Data from a total sample of 191 residents in a large Swedish nursing home facility were separated into two groups; rated as having high and low thriving based on a median split of thriving total score for each participating resident. The characteristics of residents with higher and lower levels of thriving were compared using bivariate analyses to investigate differences. Data were collected in 2013. Results: Residents with higher levels of thriving had shorter length of stay at the facility, higher functioning in Activities of Daily Living and less cognitive impairment, lower frequency of behavioural and psychological symptoms and higher assessed quality of life. The ability to walk and possibilities to spend time outdoors were higher among those with higher levels of thriving. Conclusion: Nursing home residents who experience thriving have a higher level of functioning in activities of daily living, a higher quality of life and are less physically and cognitively impaired

  • 11.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Geriatric and Long-Term Care Medicine.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Department of Psychiatry.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Hedly, Vera
    Umeå universitet.
    Morning care of patients with Alzheimer-type dementia: A theoretical model based on direct observations1986In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 369-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five hospitalized patients in different stages of Alzheimer-type dementia were monitored by unstructured, direct observations during morning care. Orem's model of nursing as a compensation for the patient's lack of self-care capabilities was used as a frame of reference for an analysis of the behaviours of patients and nurses during morning care. A 12-step classification system was developed to be used as a guide to understand and determine abilities essential for performance of morning care for demented patients. The quantitative assessment showed that none of the patients was able to manage morning care independently, but there was a wide variation in their highest level of performance

  • 12.
    Selberg, Stina
    et al.
    The OLIN Studies, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care. The OLIN Studies, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå. Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, The OLIN unit, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Jansson, Sven-Arne
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, The OLIN unit, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Backman, Helena
    The OLIN Studies, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå. Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, The OLIN unit, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science. Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Asthma control and acute health care visits among young adults with asthma: A population‐based study2019In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To study asthma control and acute health care visits among young adults with asthma.

    Background

    Despite the access to effective treatment and nursing interventions, poor asthma control is still common among individuals with asthma. However, studies describing clinical characteristics among young adults with asthma are rare.

    Design

    A population‐based cohort study.

    Methods

    In 2015, as a part of the OLIN pediatric cohort I (recruited in 1996 at age 7‐8yr), N=2291 young adults (27‐28 yr) completed a postal questionnaire survey including questions on asthma and respiratory symptoms. Of these, N=280 (12%) were identified as having current asthma and were further studied.

    Results

    Of those with current asthma, women reported respiratory symptoms and smoking to a greater extent than men. Approximately one‐fourth had uncontrolled asthma and acute health care visits due to asthma was reported by 15% of women and 8% of men. Uncontrolled asthma was associated with smoking, lower educational level, use of reliever treatment most days and acute health care visits. Acute health care visits due to asthma were associated with periodic use of regular controller treatment also after adjustment for uncontrolled asthma.

    Conclusion

    The result indicate poor adherence to asthma treatment which may lead to decreased asthma control and acute health care visits.

    Impact

    Most young adults with asthma are diagnosed and treated in primary care, ideally in a team with a nurse. The main findings highlight the need for evidenced‐based nursing interventions, contributing to a more efficient asthma management in primary care.

  • 13.
    Sjögren, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Department of Statistics, Umeå University.
    Sandman, Per Olof
    Division of Nursing, Health Sciences Center, Lund University.
    Zingmark, Karin
    County Council of Norrbotten, Department of Research and Development.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Person-centredness and its association with resident well-being in dementia care units2013In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 69, no 10, p. 2196-2206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To report a study of the relationship between person-centred care and ability to perform activities of daily living, quality of life, levels of pain, depressive symptoms, and agitated behaviours among residents with dementia in residential care facilities. Background: Standardized measurements of person-centred care have not previously been used to investigate the relationship between person-centred care and well-being for residents with dementia in residential aged care units. Design: This study had a cross-sectional design. Method: Staff and resident surveys were used in a sample of 1261 residents with dementia and 1169 staff from 151 residential care units throughout Sweden. Valid and reliable scales were used to measure person-centredness and ability to perform activities of daily living, quality of life, levels of pain, depressive symptoms, and agitated behaviours in residents. All data were collected in May 2010. Findings: Person-centred care was correlated with residents' ability to perform activities of daily living. Furthermore, residents in units with higher levels of person-centred care were rated as having higher quality of life and better ability to perform activities of daily living compared with residents in units with lower levels of person-centred care. Conclusions: There seems to be a relationship between person-centredness, residents' ability to perform activities of daily living, and residents' quality of life. Further studies are needed to explain the variation of person-centredness between units and the extent and ways this might impact on the quality of life and well-being of frail older residents with cognitive impairments in clinical practice. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 14.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Häggström, Terttu
    Working with girls living on the streets in East Africa: professionals' experiences2005In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 489-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper reports a study elucidating the meaning of caring for girls of the street, as experienced by female staff members working with street children in Eastern Africa. BACKGROUND: The phenomenon of children living on the streets is a global and escalating problem, and girls are presumed to be especially vulnerable. In East Africa, the traditional extended family system is rapidly breaking down and traditional gender values seem to remain. This was the context for investigating female carers' experience of caring for girls. METHOD: Interviews were conducted with 37 project staff members working with children living on the streets in the framework of non-governmental organizations in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania between 1997 and 1998. Transcribed text from female interviewees (n = 13) working with girls of the street was analysed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. FINDINGS: The meaning of caring for girls of the street for female professional carers in East Africa was comprehensively understood as counselling the girls to integrate the past of their adverse life stories with their present identity. Counselling meant conveying visions for a possible re-direction of the life stories, from being a girl of the street into being an accepted family girl. Caring in this context meant being squeezed between ethical demands and gender values. Experiencing frustration and powerlessness was related to gender structures in society, having to fight the grip of street culture, and a lack of professional tools. Hope and satisfaction were related to success in changing the course of life stories of girls and to seeing possibilities for contributing to empowerment of girls and community members. CONCLUSIONS: Gender issues are critical to care provided to girls of the street. Carers felt that they lacked relevant knowledge and support. ical aspects and gender issues in relation to professional care for vulnerable girls ought to be addressed in nursing education and practice, not only for developing countries, but also as a matter of global interest.

  • 15. Sävenstedt, Stefan
    et al.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Zingmark, Karin
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    The duality in using information and communication technology in elder care2006In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this paper is to report a study illuminating values and perceptions held by professional carers of older people about the use of information and communication technology applications. BACKGROUND: Various information and communication technology applications have successfully been developed to help solve a variety of problems in elder care. Beside different technical barriers and the assumed negative attitudes among older people, staff values and attitudes have been found to be an important cause of resistance to change and slowness in introduction of information and communication technology in health care of older people. METHODS: An interview study was conducted in 2004 with 10 healthcare personnel with 3-26 years experience of working in home care and nursing homes in Northern Sweden. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify recurring themes in the data. RESULTS: The interpretation of values and perceptions among carers revealed a duality where the carers perceived information and communication technology as a promoter of both inhumane and humane care, a duality that seemed to make them defensive and resistant to change. Within the overall duality, other dualities were embedded that described both perceptions about the care of older people and about being a carer. There was evidence of resistance among professional carers towards an introduction of information and communication technology applications in elder care. Carers considered that the same attributes of information and communication technology that could promote humane care could also lead to dehumanized care. CONCLUSION: There should be an ethical discussion when introducing information and communication technology applications in elder care. The best caring alternative for all those concerned should be considered. It should promote aspects of wellbeing and dignity for frail older people and fears of inhumane care among carers must be recognized and discussed

  • 16.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Erratum: The meaning of fatigue for women with multiple sclerosis (Journal of Advanced Nursing (2005) 49:1 (7-15))2005In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 561-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Söderberg, Siv
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Strand, Marie
    Sunderby sjukhus, Medicinkliniken.
    Haapala, Maria
    Huddinge universitetssjukhus, Medicinklinken.
    Lundman, Berit
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för Omvårdnad.
    Living with a woman with fibromyalgia from the perspective of the husband2003In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 143-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome, which affects mostly middle-aged women. The syndrome is poorly understood and treatment is mainly palliative. The diagnosis is established from diagnostic criteria. Living with FM means living a life greatly influenced by the illness in various ways for people affected. Aim of the study. The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of living with a woman with FM from the husbands' perspective. METHODS: Five men married to women with FM were interviewed using a narrative approach. The interviews were analysed using qualitative thematic content analysis. FINDINGS: The analysis resulted in the following seven themes: increasing responsibility and work in the home; being an advocate for and supporting the wife; learning to see the woman's changing needs; changing relationship between spouses; changing relationship with friends and relatives; deepening relationship with the children and lacking information and knowledge about FM. The findings show that the women's illness had a great impact on husbands' lives, and that husbands lacked information about the woman's illness. CONCLUSION: This study shows that it is not only the women with FM who experience a changed life; the whole family life is influenced and limited by FM. The husband's role in the family changes, first and foremost concerning responsibility and workload within the family. This must be taken into consideration in care planning. This study also highlighted the need of information and knowledge about FM expressed by the participants, information that health care personnel have a great responsibility to give.

  • 18.
    Wissing, Ulla E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Campus Norrköping, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hälsouniversitetet, Norrköping.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Campus Norrköping, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Linköping.
    Wiklund, Maria Lennernäs
    National Food Administration, Nutrition Division, Uppsala.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Campus Norrköping, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Linköping.
    Nutritional intake and physical activity in leg ulcer patients1997In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 571-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe the nutritional intake, meal patterns, physical activity and need for help in nine women living in their own homes and being treated for venous leg ulcers. Food habits were identified by use of interviews and food diaries completed by the women during a period of seven days. The intake of energy and nutrients from 304 eating events during seven days was calculated and meal patterns were evaluated using a qualitative system for meal classification. Physical activity and the degree of need were identified with the help of interviews. The intakes of energy and key nutrients for wound healing, such as protein, vitamin C and zinc, were not optimal according to the Swedish nutrition recommendations, although food habits were well organized. Most of the women had hardly any physical activities and the need of help and support varied, from daily visits to visits every second week.

  • 19.
    Zingmark, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Sandman, P. O.
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Norberg, A.
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Promoting a good life among people with Alzheimer's disease2002In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 50-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To illuminate the meaning of offering care and a place to live to people with Alzheimer's disease in a special care unit. Rationale. There is a need to gain a deeper understanding about so called 'homelike' care settings, and about how to promote experiences of being at home in residents with Alzheimer's disease. The study is part of a long-term study in a special care unit. Methods. The study comprises phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation of interviews with 10 care providers. Results. The analyses revealed a number of caring aspects such as, for example, 'viewing dignity and striving to preserve a sense of self in the resident', 'encouraging a sense of belonging', 'offering relief and 'promoting a sense of power and control in the resident', although integrated and reflected in each other. The caring aspects constituted the themes confirmation, familiarity, communion and agency considered as dimensions of the good life. Conclusion. To avoid simplification in which, for example, the furniture from a certain decade become the standard for good care, it seems important to focus upon the meaning of the good life. Care that promotes a good life of people with Alzheimer's disease seemed relationship centred.

  • 20.
    Öhrling, Kerstin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Hallberg, Ingalill R.
    Lund University, Centre for Caring Sciences.
    The meaning of preceptorship: nurses' lived experience of being a preceptor2001In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 530-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM OF THE STUDY: This phenomenological study is aimed at illuminating nurses' lived experience of the process of preceptoring and the meaning of preceptorship in a Swedish context. METHODS: Seventeen nurses from the North of Sweden with varied previous experience of preceptorship volunteered to participate. Their narratives, describing their experience of being a personal preceptor for a student nurse during practical training on a hospital ward in the third year of a 3-year diploma programme within a university college of nursing in Sweden, were transcribed verbatim. A phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation disclosed the themes 'sheltering the students when learning' and 'facilitating the students' learning', together with eight sub-themes, which created an understanding of the meaning of preceptorship. FINDINGS AND DISCUSSION: The meaning of preceptorship was understood as reducing the risk of the students learning helplessness and empowering the students when learning in practice. The meaning of preceptorship highlighted the need for further preceptor support and development of the role of the preceptor. On the basis of the findings, suggestions were made to increase the preceptors' awareness of values in nursing practice and use of pedagogical strategies in the process of preceptoring. Through such strategies a reciprocal development of the preceptors' and the faculty's knowledge may take place, to the best advantage of the students' learning and the development of the profession

  • 21.
    Öhrling, Kerstin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Nyström, Kerstin
    Parenthood experiences during the child's first year2004In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 319-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Raising a child is probably the most challenging responsibility faced by a new parent. The first year is the basis of the child's development and is significant for growth and development. Knowledge and understanding of parents' experiences are especially important for child health nurses, whose role is to support parents in their parenthood. Aim. The aim of this review was to describe mothers' and fathers' experiences of parenthood during the child's first year. Method. A literature search covering 1992-2002 was carried out using the terms parenthood, parenting, first year, infancy and experience. Of the 88 articles retrieved, 33 articles (both qualitative and quantitative) met the inclusion criteria and corresponded to the aim of this review. The data were analysed by thematic content analysis. Findings. Being a parent during the child's first year was experienced as overwhelming. The findings were described from two perspectives, namely mothers' and fathers' perspectives, since all the included studies considered mothers' and fathers' experiences separately. The following categories were identified concerning mothers: being satisfied and confident as a mother, being primarily responsible for the child is overwhelming and causes strain, struggling with the limited time available for oneself, and being fatigued and drained. The following categories were found for fathers: being confident as a father and as a partner, living up to the new demands causes strain, being prevented from achieving closeness to the child is hurtful, and being the protector and the provider of the family. The unifying theme for these categories was 'living in a new and overwhelming world'. Conclusion. There is a need for nurse interventions aimed at minimizing parents' experiences of strain. A suggested intervention is to find a method whereby child health nurses' support would lead to parents becoming empowered in their parenthood

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