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  • 1.
    Fisher, Duncan
    et al.
    The Family Initiative, Heron House, Chiswick Mall, London, UK.
    Khashu, Minesh
    Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Poole, Dorset, UK. Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, UK.
    Adama, Esther A.
    Edith Cowan University School of Nursing and Midwifery in Perth, WA, Australia.
    Feeley, Nancy
    Centre for Nursing Research & Lady Davis Institute - Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
    Garfield, Craig F.
    Departments of Pediatrics and Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Ireland, Jillian
    Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Poole, Dorset, UK. Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, UK.
    Koliouli, Flora
    Centre d’Études des Rationalités et des Savoirs, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Solidarités, Sociétés, Territoires (LISST-CERS), University of Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
    Lindberg, Birgitta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Nørgaard, Betty
    Department of Paediatrics, Lillebaelt Hospital, Kolding, Denmark.
    Provenzi, Livio
    0-3 Center for the at Risk Infant, Scientific Institute IRCCS Eugenio Medea, Bosisio Parini, LC, Italy.
    Thomson-Salo, Frances
    Centre for Women's Mental Health, Royal Women's Hospital, Carlton, Australia.
    van Teijlingen, Edwin
    Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health, Faculty of Health & Social Sciences, Bournemouth House, Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, UK.
    Fathers in neonatal units: Improving infant health by supporting the baby-father bond and mother-father coparenting2018In: Journal of Neonatal Nursing, ISSN 1355-1841, E-ISSN 1878-089X, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 306-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Family Initiative's International Neonatal Fathers Working Group, whose members are the authors of this paper, has reviewed the literature on engaging fathers in neonatal units, with the aim of making recommendations for improving experience of fathers as well as health outcomes in neonatal practice. We believe that supporting the father-baby bond and supporting co-parenting between the mother and the father benefits the health of the baby, for example, through improved weight gain and oxygen saturation and enhanced rates of breastfeeding. We find, however, that despite much interest in engaging with parents as full partners in the care of their baby, engaging fathers remains sub-optimal. Fathers typically describe the opportunity to bond with their babies, particularly skin-to-skin care, in glowing terms of gratitude, happiness and love. These sensations are underpinned by hormonal and neurobiological changes that take place in fathers when they care for their babies, as also happens with mothers. Fathers, however, are subject to different social expectations from mothers and this shapes how they respond to the situation and how neonatal staff treats them. Fathers are more likely to be considered responsible for earning, they are often considered to be less competent at caring than mothers and they are expected to be “the strong one”, providing support to mothers but not expecting it in return. Our review ends with 12 practical recommendations for neonatal teams to focus on: (1) assess the needs of mother and father individually, (2) consider individual needs and wants in family care plans, (3) ensure complete flexibility of access to the neonatal unit for fathers, (4) gear parenting education towards co-parenting, (5) actively promote father-baby bonding, (6) be attentive to fathers hiding their stress, (7) inform fathers directly not just via the mother, (8) facilitate peer-to-peer communication for fathers, (9) differentiate and analyse by gender in service evaluations, (10) train staff to work with fathers and to support co-parenting, (11) develop a father-friendly audit tool for neonatal units, and (12) organise an international consultation to update guidelines for neonatal care, including those of UNICEF.

  • 2.
    Lindberg, Birgitta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Access to videoconferencing in providing support to parents of preterm infants: Ascertaining parental views2013In: Journal of Neonatal Nursing, ISSN 1355-1841, E-ISSN 1878-089X, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 259-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Having continued hospital support, even after returning home, in the form of videoconferencing between their home and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), is of great importance for parents of preterm born infants. It is essential to elicit parents' views before providing videoconferencing access to parents. Therefore, the aim of this study was to ascertain the views of parents of preterm infants toward the use of real-time videoconferencing between their home and the NICU. Twelve parents, who participated in the study, were interviewed. Thematic content analysis of their interview texts was carried out. The analysis revealed three categories: willing to try; addition to the conventional care; might facilitate taking the step to go home. The theme identified from content analysis was ‘grabbing the chance to get extra support’. Parents view videoconferencing facility as a possible chance to get extra support. It appears to be one among several other ways to support families after returning home with their preterm infants.

  • 3.
    Lindberg, Birgitta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Öhrling, Kerstin
    Taking care of their baby at home but with nursing staff as support: the use of videoconferencing in providing neonatal support to parents of preterm infants2009In: Journal of Neonatal Nursing, ISSN 1355-1841, E-ISSN 1878-089X, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 47-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to describe the experiences of parents of preterm infants on the use of real-time videoconferencing between their home and the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Ten couples participated in the study. After taking their infant home, parents had access, via video and sound in real-time, to the staff at the NICU. Data were collected by notes and interviews with the parent; thereafter a thematic content analysis was used to analyze the texts. The analysis revealed four categories: security provided by access to the staff; face-to-face supportive meetings; need for control over the use of videoconferencing; other possible uses of videoconferencing. The identified theme was 'feeling strengthened by having a link between the home and the NICU'. Parents experienced videoconferencing as positive, which empowered them and gave them confidence in their new situation of being at home with their infant.

  • 4.
    Lindberg, Birgitta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Öhrling, Kerstin
    The birth of a premature infant: experiences from the fathers' perspective2007In: Journal of Neonatal Nursing, ISSN 1355-1841, E-ISSN 1878-089X, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 142-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the experiences from the birth of premature infants in the fathers' perspective. Eight fathers participated; their infants were born prematurely and thereby needed care in a neonatal intensive care unit. Narrative interviews were conducted and a thematic content analysis was used to analyze the interviews. Fathers described their experiences of having a preterm infant, as getting into the midst of something never previously reflected on. It was important to have information and to know what was going on, but it was difficult to understand what was happening. The fathers were protective over the mother and infant. They wanted to be with both the mother and the infant as much as possible and wished to be seen as a natural part in the care. However, fathers had their own needs and, therefore, needed to be cared for, as well.

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