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  • 1.
    Ban, Jiaxing
    et al.
    School of Water Resource and Environmental, Research Center of Environmental Science and Engineering, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing, 100083, China; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, 999077, Hong Kong, China.
    Sun, Keke
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, 999077, Hong Kong, China.
    Yao, Jun
    School of Water Resource and Environmental, Research Center of Environmental Science and Engineering, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing, 100083, China.
    Sunahara, Geoffrey
    School of Water Resource and Environmental, Research Center of Environmental Science and Engineering, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing, 100083, China; Department of Natural Resource Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H9X3V9, Canada.
    Hudson-Edwards, Karen
    Environment and Sustainability Institute and Camborne School of Mines, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9FE, UK.
    Jordan, Gyozo
    Department of Applied Chemistry, Szent István University, Budapest, 1118, Hungary; State Key Laboratory for Environmental Geochemistry, China Academy of Sciences, Guizhou, 550081, China.
    Alakangas, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Ni, Wen
    State Key Laboratory of High-Efficient Mining and Safe of Metal Mines, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Ministry of Education, Beijing, 100083, China.
    Poon, Chi-Sun
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, 999077, Hong Kong, China.
    Advances in the use of recycled non-ferrous slag as a resource for non-ferrous metal mine site remediation2022In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 213, article id 113533Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing global demand for non-ferrous metals has led to serious environmental issues involving uncovered mine site slag dumps that threaten the surrounding soils, surface waters, groundwater, and the atmosphere. Remediation of these slags using substitute cement materials for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and precursors for alkali-activated materials (AAMs) can convert hazardous solid wastes into valuable construction materials, as well as to attain the desired solidification and stabilization (S/S) of heavy metal(loid)s (HM). This review discusses the current research on the effect of non-ferrous slags on the reaction mechanisms of the OPC and AAM. The S/S of HM from the non-ferrous slags in AAM and OPC is also reviewed. HM can be stabilized in these materials based on the complex salt effect and isomorphic effects. The major challenges faced in AAMs and OPC for HM stabilization include the long-term durability of the matrix (e.g., sulfate attack, stability of volume). The existing knowledge gaps and future trends for the sustainable application of non-ferrous slags are also discussed.

  • 2.
    Chaudhary, Ratiram Gomaji
    et al.
    Post Graduate Department of Chemistry, Seth Kesarimal Porwal College of Arts, And Science and Commerce, Kamptee, 441001, India.
    Sonkusare, Vaishali
    Post Graduate Teaching Department of Chemistry, Rashtrasant Tukdoji Maharaj Nagpur University, Nagpur, 440033, India.
    Bhusari, Ganesh
    Research and Development Division, Solar Industries India Limited, Nagpur, 440023, India.
    Mondal, Aniruddha
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Potbhare, Ajay
    Post Graduate Department of Chemistry, Seth Kesarimal Porwal College of Arts, And Science and Commerce, Kamptee, 441001, India.
    Juneja, Harjeet
    Post Graduate Teaching Department of Chemistry, Rashtrasant Tukdoji Maharaj Nagpur University, Nagpur, 440033, India.
    Abdala, Ahmed
    Chemical Engineering Program, Texas A and M University at Qatar POB, 23784, Doha, Qatar.
    Sharma, Rohit
    Department of Rasa Shastra and Bhaishajya Kalpana, Faculty of Ayurveda, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, 221005, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    Preparation of mesoporous ThO2 nanoparticles: Influence of calcination on morphology and visible-light-driven photocatalytic degradation of indigo carmine and methylene blue2023In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 222, article id 115363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article reports the synthesis of thoria nanoparticles (ThO2 NPs) via sol-gel process and examines the effect of calcination temperature of ThO2 on the morphology and photocatalytic degradation of indigo carmine (IC) and methylene blue (MB) under visible-light. As-synthesized white crystals of ThO2 were subjected to calcination at different temperatures, viz. 700 °C (TH-700), 800 °C (TH-800), and 900 °C (TH-900). The effect of calcination temperature on the structural, morphological, thermal, surface area-porosity, and optical properties of ThO2 NPs were investigated by diverse analytical techniques. XRD patterns show the cubic-space group Fm-3m (225) with parameter a = 5.597 Å and reveals crystallite sizes increased with calcination temperature. The bandgap energy was found to be 1.85 eV, 2.33 eV, and 2.71 eV for TH-700, TH-800, and TH-900 NPs, respectively, calculated by Kubelka-Munk (KM) plot. SEM and TEM unveil that the sample TH-700 calcined at a low temperature of 700 °C yields assembled nanosheets, while at higher temperatures, i.e., 800 °C (TH-800) and 900 °C (TH-900), produces agglomerated nanomaterials. Further, TH-700 sample exhibits enhanced photocatalytic degradation within 120 min for both IC and MB dye than TH-800 and TH-900 counterparts. Among the dyes, IC shows improved photocatalytic efficiency than MB for TH-700, owing to the increased optical absorption and improved separation of photogenerated charge carriers. The reusability study of TH-700 reveals that the catalysts were stable up to four successive cycles with no drastic changes in photocatalytic efficiency. Also, systematic photodisintegration of IC was investigated by Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS).

  • 3.
    Fuchs, Boris
    et al.
    Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Campus Evenstad, 2480 Koppang, Norway.
    Joly, Kyle
    National Park Service, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, 99709 Fairbanks, Alaska, USA.
    Hilderbrand, Grant V.
    National Park Service, Alaska Regional Office, 99501 Anchorage, Alaska, USA.
    Evans, Alina L.
    Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Campus Evenstad, 2480 Koppang, Norway.
    Rodushkin, Ilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. ALS Scandinavia AB, 97187, Luleå, Sweden.
    Mangipane, Lindsey S.
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Marine Mammals Management, 99503 Anchorage, Alaska, USA.
    Mangipane, Buck A.
    Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, National Park Service, 99501 Anchorage, Alaska, USA.
    Gustine, David D.
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Marine Mammals Management, 99503 Anchorage, Alaska, USA.
    Zedrosser, Andreas
    Department of Natural Science and Environmental Health, University of South-Eastern Norway, 3800 Boe in Telemark, Norway; Institute for Wildlife Biology and Game Management, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, 1180 Vienna, Austria.
    Brown, Ludovick
    Departement de biologie, Universite de Sherbrooke, J1K 2R1 Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada.
    Arnemo, Jon M.
    Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Campus Evenstad, 2480 Koppang, Norway; Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 901 83, Umeå, Sweden.
    Toxic elements in arctic and sub-arctic brown bears: Blood concentrations of As, Cd, Hg and Pb in relation to diet, age, and human footprint2023In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 229, article id 115952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contamination with arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) is a global concern impairing resilience of organisms and ecosystems. Proximity to emission sources increases exposure risk but remoteness does not alleviate it. These toxic elements are transported in atmospheric and oceanic pathways and accumulate in organisms. Mercury accumulates in higher trophic levels. Brown bears (Ursus arctos), which often live in remote areas, are long-lived omnivores, feeding on salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and berries (Vaccinium spp.), resources also consumed by humans.

    We measured blood concentrations of As, Cd, Hg and Pb in bears (n = 72) four years and older in Scandinavia and three national parks in Alaska, USA (Lake Clark, Katmai and Gates of the Arctic) using high-resolution, inductively-coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry. Age and sex of the bears, as well as the typical population level diet was associated with blood element concentrations using generalized linear regression models.

    Alaskan bears consuming salmon had higher Hg blood concentrations compared to Scandinavian bears feeding on berries, ants (Formica spp.) and moose (Alces). Cadmium and Pb blood concentrations were higher in Scandinavian bears than in Alaskan bears. Bears using marine food sources, in addition to salmon in Katmai, had higher As blood concentrations than bears in Scandinavia. Blood concentrations of Cd and Pb, as well as for As in female bears increased with age. Arsenic in males and Hg concentrations decreased with age.

    We detected elevated levels of toxic elements in bears from landscapes that are among the most pristine on the planet. Sources are unknown but anthropogenic emissions are most likely involved. All study areas face upcoming change: Increasing tourism and mining in Alaska and more intensive forestry in Scandinavia, combined with global climate change in both regions. Baseline contaminant concentrations as presented here are important knowledge in our changing world.

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  • 4.
    Rabiee, Navid
    et al.
    School of Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, 2109, Australia; Centre for Molecular Medicine and Innovative Therapeutics, Murdoch University, Perth, WA 6150, Australia; Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran P.O. Box 11155-9161, Iran.
    Sharma, Rajni
    School of Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, 2109, Australia.
    Foorginezhad, Sahar
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. School of Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, 2109, Australia.
    Jouyandeh, Maryam
    Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran.
    Asadnia, Mohsen
    School of Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, 2109, Australia.
    Rabiee, Mohammad
    Biomaterial Group, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.
    Akhavan, Omid
    Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran P.O. Box 11155-9161, Iran.
    Lima, Eder C.
    Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.
    Formela, Krzysztof
    Department of Polymer Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Gdansk University of Technology, G. Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk, Poland.
    Ashrafizadeh, Milad
    Department of General Surgery and Institute of Precision Diagnosis and Treatment of Digestive System Tumors, Carson International Cancer Center, Shenzhen University General Hospital, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China; Shanghai Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
    Fallah, Zari
    Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, P. O. Box 47416, 95447, Babolsar, Iran.
    Hassanpour, Mahnaz
    Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan, 45137-66731 Iran.
    Mohammadi, Abbas
    Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441, Iran.
    Saeb, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Polymer Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Gdansk University of Technology, G. Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk, Poland.
    Green and Sustainable Membranes: A review2023In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 231, article id 116133Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Membranes are ubiquitous tools for modern water treatment technology that critically eliminate hazardous materials such as organic, inorganic, heavy metals, and biomedical pollutants. Nowadays, nano-membranes are of particular interest for myriad applications such as water treatment, desalination, ion exchange, ion concentration control, and several kinds of biomedical applications. However, this state-of-the-art technology suffers from some drawbacks, e.g., toxicity and fouling of contaminants, which makes the synthesis of green and sustainable membranes indeed safety-threatening. Typically, sustainability, non-toxicity, performance optimization, and commercialization are concerns centered on manufacturing green synthesized membranes. Thus, critical issues related to toxicity, biosafety, and mechanistic aspects of green-synthesized nano-membranes have to be systematically and comprehensively reviewed and discussed. Herein we evaluate various aspects of green nano-membranes in terms of their synthesis, characterization, recycling, and commercialization aspects. Nanomaterials intended for nano-membrane development are classified in view of their chemistry/synthesis, advantages, and limitations. Indeed, attaining prominent adsorption capacity and selectivity in green-synthesized nano-membranes requires multi-objective optimization of a number of materials and manufacturing parameters. In addition, the efficacy and removal performance of green nano-membranes are analyzed theoretically and experimentally to provide researchers and manufacturers with a comprehensive image of green nano-membrane efficiency under real environmental conditions.

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  • 5.
    Ren, Zhongfei
    et al.
    Chemical Process Engineering, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4300, FIN-90014, Oulu, Finland.
    Bergmann, Ulrich
    Department of Biochemistry and Biocenter, University of Oulu, Oulu, FIN-99020, Finland.
    Uwayezu, Jean Noel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Carabante, Ivan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Lejon, Tore
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. Department of Chemistry, UiT-The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Leiviskä, Tiina
    Chemical Process Engineering, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4300, FIN-90014, Oulu, Finland.
    Combination of adsorption/desorption and photocatalytic reduction processes for PFOA removal from water by using an aminated biosorbent and a UV/sulfite system2023In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 228, article id 115930Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are stable organic chemicals, which have been used globally since the 1940s and have caused PFAS contamination around the world. This study explores perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) enrichment and destruction by a combined method of sorption/desorption and photocatalytic reduction. A novel biosorbent (PG-PB) was developed from raw pine bark by grafting amine groups and quaternary ammonium groups onto the surface of bark particles. The results of PFOA adsorption at low concentration suggest that PG-PB has excellent removal efficiency (94.8%–99.1%, PG-PB dosage: 0.4 g/L) to PFOA in the concentration range of 10 μg/L to 2 mg/L. The PG-PB exhibited high adsorption efficiency regarding PFOA, being 456.0 mg/g at pH 3.3 and 258.0 mg/g at pH 7 with an initial concentration of 200 mg/L. The groundwater treatment reduced the total concentration of 28 PFAS from 18 000 ng/L to 9900 ng/L with 0.8 g/L of PG-PB. Desorption experiments examined 18 types of desorption solutions, and the results showed that 0.05% NaOH and a mixture of 0.05% NaOH + 20% methanol were efficient for PFOA desorption from the spent PG-PB. More than 70% (>70 mg/L in 50 mL) and 85% (>85 mg/L in 50 mL) of PFOA were recovered from the first and second desorption processes, respectively. Since high pH promotes PFOA degradation, the desorption eluents with NaOH were directly treated with a UV/sulfite system without further adjustment. The final PFOA degradation and defluorination efficiency in the desorption eluents with 0.05% NaOH + 20% methanol reached 100% and 83.1% after 24 h reaction. This study proved that the combination of adsorption/desorption and a UV/sulfite system for PFAS removal is a feasible solution for environmental remediation.

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  • 6.
    Wang, Zihan
    et al.
    College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, PR China.
    Hartmann, Tobias Edward
    Institute of Crop Science, University of Hohenheim, Germany.
    Wang, Xiuheng
    State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, School of Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, PR China.
    Cui, Zhenling
    College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, PR China.
    Hou, Yong
    College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, PR China.
    Meng, Fanlei
    College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, PR China.
    Yu, Xingchen
    College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, PR China.
    Wu, Jiechen
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water. College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, PR China.
    Zhang, Fusuo
    College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, PR China.
    Phosphorus flow analysis in the maize based food-feed-energy systems in China2020In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 184, article id 109319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential and limiting nutrient for agricultural systems, where the demand for agricultural products such as food, feed, and bio-fuel are the major drivers of the intensification of agricultural production systems. Globally, maize is one of three main cereal crops, a main feedstock for animal production and a substrate for the production of bio-ethanol. This study investigated P flows through the multiple utilization systems of maize (as represented by the subsystems of food, feed and energy production) at a crop level of 2016 as reference year and made future predictions of P flows for the year 2030 based on different scenarios for food-feed-energy systems in China. For 2016, the subsystem of animal production resulted in the highest waste of P due to inappropriate manure management, but the subsystem of value-added products (Bio-fuel production, distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), maize-oil) showed the lowest P use efficiency (39%). From the value-added subsystem, 17% of P from the process flow to the subsystem of animal production as DDGS, and 61% of P is wasted associated with wastewater and sludge. Future scenarios of structural adjustments in the maize consumption system predict that the supply of maize for animal feed will be threatened if the policy of the Biofuel National Promotion before 2020 is fully implemented in China, as current maize production will not meet the future demand of food, feed and energy simultaneously. The results emphasized the use of P waste resources and better sludge management from a systems perspective. This also implied the importance of exploring coordinated development and integrated strategies for sustainable P flow management in multiple utilization systems.

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