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  • 1.
    Dür, Mona
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University of Vienna.
    Coenen, Michaela
    Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Research Unit for Bio Psychosocial Health, Marchioninistraße 17, 81377, Munich.
    Stoffer, Michaela Alexandra
    Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University of Vienna.
    Fialka-Moser, Veronika
    Medical University of Vienna, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra
    Medical University of Vienna, Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Diabetology.
    Kjeken, Ingvild
    Diakonhjemmet Hospital, National Advisory Unit on Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Department of Rheumatology, Postbox 23 Vinderen.
    Drăgoi, Răzvan Gabriel
    “Victor Babeş” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Rehabilitation, Physical Medicine and Rheumatology, Piata Eftimie Murgu 2, Timişoara.
    Mattsson, Malin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Boström, Carina
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Smolen, Josef S.
    Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University of Vienna.
    Stamm, Tanja A.
    Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University of Vienna.
    Do patient-reported outcome measures cover personal factors important to people with rheumatoid arthritis?: A mixed methods design using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as frame of reference2015In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 13, article id 27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundPersonal factors (PFs) are internal factors that determine functioning and the individuals’ experience of disability. Their coverage by patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) has not been examined in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) so far. The aims of this study were to identify PFs important in the life stories of people with RA and to determine their coverage by PROMs used in RA.MethodsThe qualitative data of people with RA was explored to identify PFs. Additionally a systematic literature search was conducted to find PROMs used in RA. PROMs items were linked to the components, domains and categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to determine the coverage of important PFs by PROMs.ResultsTwelve PFs were found to be important in the life stories of people with RA. The PFs coping and reflecting about one’s life in an optimistic way were covered most frequently, each by 14 of the 42 explored PROMs, while job satisfaction was not covered at all. The London Coping with Rheumatoid Arthritis Questionnaire, General Self-Efficacy Scale, Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale, Rheumatoid Arthritis Self-Efficacy Questionnaire and Revised Ways of Coping Inventory covered most PFs. Nineteen PROMs did not cover any of the PFs.ConclusionSeveral PFs were identified as important in the life stories of people with RA, but only 55% of the PROMS covered some of these PFs. When evaluating PFs important to people with RA, health professionals should be alert on which PROMs can be used to assess which PFs.

  • 2.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Lexell, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Life satisfaction after traumatic brain injury: comparison of ratings with the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-11) and the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS)2016In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background An optimal life satisfaction (LS) is considered an important long-term outcome after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is, however, not clear to what extent a single instrument captures all aspects of LS, and different instruments may be needed to comprehensively describe LS. The aim of this study was to compare self-ratings of life satisfaction after a TBI with two commonly used instruments. Methods Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-11), comprising eleven items and Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS), comprising five items, were administered to 67 individuals (51 men and 16 women). Secondary analysis of data collected as part of a survey of individuals with TBI 6 to 15 years post TBI. Results Item 1 in LiSat-11 (‘Life as a whole’) and the total SWLS score was strongly correlated (Spearman’s rho = 0.66; p < 0.001). The total score in SWLS had the strongest correlation with items in LiSat-11. All items in LiSat-11, except ‘Family life’ and ‘Partner relationship’, were moderately to strongly correlated with items in SWLS. The item ‘Partner relationship’ in LiSat-11 did not correlate with any of the items in SWLS or the total score. The item ‘If I could live my life over, I would change nothing’ in SWLS had the weakest correlations with items in LiSat-11. Items ‘Vocation’ and ‘Leisure’ in LISat-11 were most strongly correlated with items in SWLS, whereas the item ‘ADL’ in LiSat-11 was more weakly correlated with items in SWLS. Conclusions The strength of the relationships implies that the two instruments assess similar but not identical aspects of LS and therefore complement each other when it is rated.

  • 3.
    Jonasson, Stina B.
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Nilsson, Maria H.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Lexell, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Psychometric properties of the original and short versions of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) in people with Parkinson’s disease2017In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Fear of falling is common in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and is associated with an increased risk for future falls, activity limitations and a reduced quality of life. The Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) assesses fear of falling conceptualized as concerns about falling. The original FES-I has good psychometric properties in people with PD, but whether this applies also for the short version of FES-I remains to be shown.

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the short FES-I and to compare these with the original FES-I in the same sample of people with PD. The investigated psychometric properties included known groups validity, data completeness, scaling assumptions, targeting and reliability.

    Methods

    A postal survey, which included the original, full-length FES-I, was distributed to 174 people with PD. Responders received a second survey after two weeks. From these data, short FES-I total scores were calculated by extracting the items that are included in the short version of the scale.

    Results

    Median age and PD duration of the 101 responders (43% women) were 73 and 5 years, respectively. The original as well as the short FES-I scores were able to discriminate (p < 0.001) between groups with and without fear of falling, activity avoidance, falls, near falls, and with various self-rated PD severity, respectively. Both versions of FES-I had a high level of data completeness (0.7 to 0.9% missing item responses). Scaling assumptions were acceptable for the original as well as the short FES-I. While the short FES-I had 19% floor effect, the original version was better targeted. Both versions were reliable and obtained high values for internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha >0.8) and test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient > 0.9).

    Conclusions

    Both the original and short FES-I revealed generally good psychometric properties in people with PD, although the original scale was better targeted. Due to the higher floor effect in the short FES-I, the present findings favors using the original, full-length FES-I in longitudinal follow-ups, intervention studies and clinical practice when addressing concerns about falling.

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