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  • 1.
    Fredin-Knutzén, Johan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olsson, Niklas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Education, Language, and Teaching. VTI (The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute), Linköping, Sweden.
    Rosberg, Tomas
    VTI (The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute), Linköping, Sweden.
    Thorslund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lidestam, Björn
    VTI (The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute), Linköping, Sweden.
    Train drivers' work-related stress and job satisfaction2023In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 65, no 9, p. 775-782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives 

    This study investigated which work-related stressors are rated highest by train drivers, and which are strongest correlated with consideration to change profession.

    Methods 

    In a questionnaire, a total of N = 251 Swedish train drivers rated 17 work-related stressors, to which extent they had considered quitting their profession, and if they had experienced a PUT (person under train) accident.

    Results 

    PUTs (when experienced) and irregular work-hours are the main stressors, but the strongest predictors of consideration to change profession are those that are encountered often, and last over time (e.g., irregular work-hours, r = .61; and major organizational changes, r = .51).

    Conclusions 

    For effective reduction of stress and improved job satisfaction, focus should be on aspects that affect everyday life for drivers, such as better working shifts, less delays, and improved social climate.

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