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  • 1.
    Calner, Tommy
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Isaksson, Gunilla
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Michaelson, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    “I know what I want but I’m not sure how to get it”: Expectations of physiotherapy treatment of persons with persistent pain2016In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 25, p. e142-e143Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Clark, Nicholas C.
    et al.
    School of Sport, Health, and Applied Sciences. St Mary's University, London.
    Röijezon, Ulrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Treleaven, Julia
    CCRE Spine, Division of Physiotherapy, SHRS, University of Queensland, Brisbane.
    Proprioception in Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation: Part 2: Clinical Assessment and Intervention2015In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 378-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionProprioception can be impaired in gradual-onset musculoskeletal pain disorders and following trauma. Understanding of the role of proprioception in sensorimotor dysfunction and methods for assessment and interventions is of vital importance in musculoskeletal rehabilitation. In Part 1 of this two-part Masterclass we presented a theory-based overview of the role of proprioception in sensorimotor control, causes and findings of altered proprioception in musculoskeletal conditions, and general principles of assessment and interventions.PurposeThe aim of this second part is to present specific methods for clinical assessment and interventions to improve proprioception in the spine and extremities.ImplicationsClinical assessment of proprioception can be performed using goniometers, inclinometers, laser-pointers, and pressure sensors. Manual therapy, taping, and bracing can immediately enhance proprioception and should be used to prepare for exercise interventions. Various types of exercise (active joint repositioning, force sense, co-ordination, muscle performance, balance/unstable surface, plyometric, and vibration training) should be employed for long-term enhancement of proprioception.

  • 3.
    Linder, Martin
    et al.
    Ystad Rehab Center.
    Michaelson, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Röijezon, Ulrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Laterality judgments in people with low back pain-a cross-sectional observational and test-retest reliability study2016In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 21, p. 128-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundDisruption of cortical representation, or body schema, has been indicated as a factor in the persistence and recurrence of LBP. This has been observed through impaired laterality judgment ability and it has been suggested that this ability is affected in a spatial rather than anatomical manner.ObjectivesWe compared laterality judgment performance of foot and trunk movements between people with LBP with or without leg pain and healthy controls, and investigated associations between test performance and pain. We also assessed the test-retest reliability of the Recognise OnlineTM software when used in a clinical and a home setting.DesignCross-sectional observational and test-retest study.MethodsThirty individuals with LBP and 30 healthy controls performed judgment tests of foot and trunk laterality once supervised in a clinic and twice at home.ResultsNo statistically significant group differences were found. LBP intensity was negatively related to trunk laterality accuracy (p=0.019). Intraclass correlation values ranged from 0.51-0.91. Reaction time improved significantly between test occasions while accuracy did not.ConclusionsLaterality judgments were not impaired in subjects with LBP compared to controls. Further research may clarify the relationship between pain mechanisms in LBP and laterality judgment ability. Reliability values were mostly acceptable, with wide and low confidence intervals, suggesting test retest reliability for Recognise OnlineTM could be questioned in this trial. A significant learning effect was observed which should be considered in clinical and research application of the test.

  • 4.
    Michaelson, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Holmberg, D.
    Cederkliniken Primary health care center, Department of Research, The Norrbotten County Council, Luleå.
    Aasa, Björn
    Department of Orthopaedics, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Proprioception in musculoskeletal rehabilitation2016In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 25, p. e78-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Michaelson, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Holmberg, David
    Cederkliniken Primary Health Care Centre.
    Aasa, Björn
    Norrlandsklinikens hälsocentral, Umeå.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Deadlift versus low load motor control for patients with mechanical low back pain2016In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 25, p. e78-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Röijezon, Ulrik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Björklund, Martin
    University of Gävle, Centre of Musculoskeletal Research.
    Djupsjöbacka, Mats
    University of Gävle, Centre of Musculoskeletal Research.
    The slow and fast components of postural sway in chronic neck pain2011In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 273-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several studies have reported altered postural control in people with neck pain. The aim of this study was to increase the understanding of the nature of altered postural control in neck pain by studying the slow and fast components of body sway. Methods: Subjects with whiplash associated disorders (WAD, n = 21) and chronic non-specific neck pain (NS, n = 24) were compared to healthy controls (CON, n = 21) in this cross-sectional study. The magnitudes of the slow and fast sway components were assessed in Rhomberg quiet stance for 30 s on a force plate with eyes closed. We also investigated associations between postural sway and symptoms, self-ratings of functioning and kinesiophobia. Results: Increased magnitude of the slow sway component was found in WAD, but not in NS. Greater magnitude of the slow component in WAD was associated with poorer physical functioning, including balance disturbances, and more severe sensory symptoms. Conclusions: Increased magnitude of the slow sway component implies an aberration in sensory feedback or processing of sensory information in WAD. The associations between postural sway and self-rated characteristics support the clinical validity of the test. Further investigation into NS, involving a longer test time is warranted

  • 7.
    Röijezon, Ulrik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Clark, Nicholas C.
    School of Sport, Health, and Applied Sciences. St Mary's University, London.
    Treleaven, Julia
    CCRE Spine, Division of Physiotherapy, SHRS, University of Queensland, Brisbane.
    Proprioception in Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation: Part 1: Basic Science and Principles of Assessment and Clinical Interventions2015In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 368-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionImpaired proprioception has been reported as a feature in a number of musculoskeletal disorders of various body parts, from the cervical spine to the ankle. Proprioception deficits can occur as a result of traumatic damage, e.g., to ligaments and muscles, but can also occur in association with painful disorders of a gradual-onset nature. Muscle fatigue can also adversely affect proprioception and this has implications for both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. Due to the importance of proprioception for sensorimotor control, specific methods for assessment and training of proprioception have been developed for both the spine and the extremities.PurposeThe aim of this first part of a two part series on proprioception in musculoskeletal rehabilitation is to present a theory based overview of the role of proprioception in sensorimotor control, assessment, causes and findings of altered proprioception in musculoskeletal disorders and general principles of interventions targeting proprioception.ImplicationsAn understanding of the basic science of proprioception, consequences of disturbances and theories behind assessment and interventions is vital for the clinical management of musculoskeletal disorders. Part one of this series supplies a theoretical base for part two which is more practically and clinically orientated, covering specific examples of methods for clinical assessment and interventions to improve proprioception in the spine and the extremities.

  • 8.
    Sjölander, Per
    et al.
    Southern Lapland Research Department, Vilhelmina.
    Michaelson, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Jaric, Slobodan
    University of Gävle, Centre of Musculoskeletal Research.
    Djupsjöbacka, Mats
    University of Gävle, Centre of Musculoskeletal Research.
    Sensorimotor disturbances in chronic neck pain: range of motion, peak velocity, smoothness of movement, and repositioning acuity2008In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 122-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate sensorimotor functions in patients with chronic neck pain with objective and quantitative methods. A group of 16 patients with chronic idiopathic neck pain of insidious onset or whiplash associated disorders (WAD) was compared to an equally sized group of healthy subjects. Kinematics were investigated during voluntary head rotations by measuring range of motion, variability of range of motion (ROM-Variability), peak velocity, and smoothness of movement (jerk index). Repositioning acuity after cervical rotations was evaluated by analysing constant and variable error (VE). In comparison to the healthy subjects, the patients showed significantly larger jerk index, ROM-Variability and VE. No statistically significant differences were found between insidious neck pain and WAD. It is concluded that jerky and irregular cervical movements and poor position sense acuity are characteristic sensorimotor symptoms in chronic neck pain. The observed individuality in sensorimotor disturbances emphasizes the importance of developing specific rehabilitation programs for specific dysfunctions, and of using objective and quantitative methods for evaluation of rehabilitation.

  • 9.
    Treleaven, Julia
    et al.
    CCRE Spine, Division of Physiotherapy, SHRS, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Health Sciences, University of Qld, Brisbane.
    Röijezon, Ulrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Clark, N.
    School of Sport, Health, and Applied Sciences. St Mary's University, London.
    Proprioception in musculoskeletal rehabilitation2016In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 25, p. e13-e14Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 9 of 9
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