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  • 1.
    Isaksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Lexell, Jan
    Skär, Lisa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Social support provides motivation and ability to participate in occupation2007In: OTJR (Thorofare, N.J.), ISSN 1539-4492, E-ISSN 1938-2383, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 23-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, a qualitative perspective of how 13 women (aged 25 to 61 years) with spinal cord injury perceive the importance of social support for their participation in occupation is presented. The data were collected through repeated in-depth interviews and field notes, and the analysis used a grounded theory approach. The women needed both emotional and practical support, which was important in a time perspective and motivated them to participate in occupation. The women needed to receive support soon after the injury, but after a period of time they needed to give and receive support in a reciprocal fashion. Social support is therefore an effective rehabilitation strategy that can motivate people with disabilities to participate in meaningful occupation. The importance of social support for a person's motivation and ability to participate in occupation expands our knowledge of the relationship between individuals, their social environment, and occupation.

  • 2.
    Larsson-Lund, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Nygård, Louise
    Karolinska institutet, Divison of occupational therapy. Department of Neurotec.
    Incorporating or resisting assistive devices: Different approaches to achieving a desired occupational self-image2003In: OTJR (Thorofare, N.J.), ISSN 1539-4492, E-ISSN 1938-2383, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 67-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the understanding of how people with disabilities experience the meaning of their assistive devices in their occupations and how they act on their experiences. Seventeen participants were interviewed and data were analyzed using a qualitative approach. The participants' experiences showed that they reacted differently to the manifold and often contradictory meaning of assistive devices. The analysts organized the participants' reactions into three categories: pragmatic users, ambivalent users, and reluctant users. The differences between the participants were understood as representing different adaptive approaches to achieve desired occupational self-images. Thus, the assistive devices were not in themselves important, but were merely a means to achieve a desired self-image. The findings reflect that the participants' experiences of using assistive devices reveal meanings about their use that go beyond the traditional medical perspective that focuses on the role of assistive devices as compensation for physical impairment

  • 3.
    Lexell, Eva Månsson
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Skåne University Hospital.
    Iwarsson, Susanne
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
    Larsson-Lund, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Occupational adaptation in people with multiple sclerosis2011In: OTJR (Thorofare, N.J.), ISSN 1539-4492, E-ISSN 1938-2383, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 127-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to gain an enhanced understanding of how people with multiple sclerosis experience their occupational adaptation. Ten people with multiple sclerosis were interviewed and the constant comparative method was used to analyze the data. Their occupational adaptation was experienced as a constant struggle and non-linear, and served as the means of achieving either a desired self or a desired family life. Adaptations of occupations differed according to the evolving goals of the participants. The findings showed that the participants often selected occupational adaptations to meet their family needs over their own. These findings can help professionals to establish where their clients with multiple sclerosis are in the adaptation process and offer appropriate client-centered interventions.

  • 4.
    Petersson, Ingela
    et al.
    Department Neurobiology, Caring Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet.
    Fisher, Anne C.
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Department Neurobiology, Caring Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lilja, Margareta
    The client-clinician assessment protocol (C-CAP: Evaluation of its psychometric properties for use with people aging with disabilities in need of home modifications2007In: OTJR (Thorofare, N.J.), ISSN 1539-4492, E-ISSN 1938-2383, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 140-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to evaluate aspects of the validity and reliability of the Client-Clinician Assessment Protocol (C-CAP) Part I. C-CAP data for 103 people aging with disabilities in need of home modification services were analyzed using the Rasch rating scale model. The C-CAP Part I consists of a client self-report of ability in daily life tasks comprising three scales (independence, difficulty, and safety). The analysis demonstrated support for internal scale validity, person response validity, and person separation reliability of the C-CAP Part I, although the results differed among the three scales. The results of this study indicated that the C-CAP Part I has psychometric strengths and limitations. The instrument has the potential to be used in the home environment with people who are aging with disabilities. The C-CAP could complement already existing tools that are used to assess functioning in activities of daily living, especially regarding the focus on the clients' self-report of difficulty and safety in daily life at home and in the community.

  • 5.
    Womack, Jennifer L.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA.
    Lilja, Margareta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Dickie, Virginia
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA.
    Isaksson, Gunilla
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Occupational Therapists’ Interactions With Older Adult Caregivers: Negotiating Priorities and Expertise2019In: OTJR (Thorofare, N.J.), ISSN 1539-4492, E-ISSN 1938-2383, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although numerous studies have examined provider–caregiver interactions and their influence on care outcomes, few represent the perspective of the provider or specifically consider occupational therapy practitioners. The aim of this article is to explore the perspectives of occupational therapists regarding interactions with older adult caregivers in geriatric practice settings. The study was conducted using a constructivist grounded theory approach based on data obtained from repeated focus group sessions and subsequent individual reflections. Occupational therapy practitioners interact with older adult caregivers in ways that reflect negotiations about who holds expertise and whose priorities are most relevant in care situations. These interactions are influenced by health care contexts that foreground the needs of the care recipient. A deeper understanding of caregiving as an occupation via a transactional perspective may serve to illuminate complex care situations and optimize therapist–caregiver interactions.

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