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  • 1.
    Bai, Guohua
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Embryonic approach to the development of information systems1997In: Journal of strategic information systems, ISSN 0963-8687, E-ISSN 1873-1198, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 299-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prototyping in information systems (IS) development has recently shown increased benefits. In principle, the prototyping process provides users with more opportunities to improve their work, to verify that their needs are provided for, and that the terms used in the interface of the designed system are consistent with those in use in their work. As a result, they should be highly motivated to participate in an IS development process. However, certain drawbacks inherited from traditional prototyping in industrial production could limit the use of this approach in IS development. Some problems are identified in this paper, such as: (1) product-oriented thinking; (2) feedback delay; (3) the preoccupation of designers with respect to the experimental approach; (4) problems arising from the users' participation being indirect, and (5) negative attitudes towards contradiction. This paper proposes an organic approach, the `Embryonic Approach' (EmA), in order to explore the full potentialities of prototyping in IS development. This approach is based on two fundamental elements; an adaptive and expandable kernel-structure, and a built-in communication mechanism.

  • 2.
    DesAutels, Philip
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Berthon, Pierre
    Bentley University, United States.
    The PC (polluting computer): forever a tragedy of the commons?2011In: Journal of strategic information systems, ISSN 0963-8687, E-ISSN 1873-1198, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 113-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The portable computer or notebook has become an integral and even essential aspect of modern life. Year-in-year its price to the consumer falls while its performance grows, yet recent analysis suggests that pound-for-pound its environmental costs are amongst the highest of any product on the planet. In this paper we explore the market price of "sustainable" notebooks. Drawing on the framework of the ‘tragedy of the commons' we postulate that as manufacturers shift costs away from the commons to comply with sustainability standards, the cost to the consumer will inevitably rise. We test our hypothesis by comparing the prices of EPEAT Gold certified notebooks with uncertified portable computers. The results are discussed, alternative hypotheses explored and further research outlined.

  • 3. Howcroft, Debra
    et al.
    Newell, S.
    Bentley College.
    Wagner, E.
    Cornell University, Ithaca.
    Understanding the contextual influences on enterprise system design, implementation, use and evaluation2004In: Journal of strategic information systems, ISSN 0963-8687, E-ISSN 1873-1198, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 271-277Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Pitt, Leyland
    et al.
    Simon Fraser University, Vancouver.
    Parent, Michael
    Simon Fraser University, Vancouver.
    Junglas, Iris
    University of Houston.
    Chan, Anthony
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Spyropoulou, Stavroula
    Leeds University Business School, University of Leeds.
    Integrating the smartphone into a sound environmental information systems strategy: principles, practices and a research agenda2011In: Journal of strategic information systems, ISSN 0963-8687, E-ISSN 1873-1198, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 27-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smartphones are both green technologies and an integral parts of green information systems that are beginning to make serious contributions toward a sustainable environment. We trace the rise of the smartphone, with particular attention given to the iPhone and its many applications. The fundamental differences between smartphone-based and more common Internet applications, and how these might enhance sustainable strategies for organizations with a green agenda are highlighted. U-Commerce is suggested as a theoretical framework that best explains this, and the four dimension of U-Commerce are employed to illustrate how innovative organizations are using the unique characteristics of smartphones to pursue environmentally sound strategies. A process that might be followed for indentifying applications for sustainable issues, making sure that the applications take advantages of a smartphone's unique features, and that contribute to sustainability by using fewer resources, protecting resources, and improving our use of current resources. The paper concludes by identifying a research agenda for information systems scholars to pursue studying the use of smartphones in search of a sustainable information technology agenda.

  • 5.
    Wagner, Erica
    et al.
    Cornell University, Ithaca.
    Howcroft, Debra
    Newell, Sue
    Bentley College.
    Special Issue Part II: Understanding the contextual influences on enterprise system design, implementation, use and evaluation2005In: Journal of strategic information systems, ISSN 0963-8687, E-ISSN 1873-1198, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 91-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ways in which enterprise systems (ES) influence and are influenced by the context of adoption, including influences at the individual, group, organizational and societal levels were investigated. Context aware analysis of the influences on the design, implementation, use and evaluation of an ES were also presented. A two dimensions framework was presented for addressing the organizational issues associated with an ES implementation. A qualitative mode of enquiry was adopted to enable discussion of a number of research issues, where the issues were explored and illustrated in the context of a central accounting department of a large multinational firm.

  • 6.
    Wilson, M.
    et al.
    Manchester Business School.
    Howcroft, Debra
    Power, politics and persuasion in IS evaluation: A focus on 'relevant social groups'2005In: Journal of strategic information systems, ISSN 0963-8687, E-ISSN 1873-1198, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 17-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this paper is with the activities associated with evaluations and their role in attaining (or not) stabilisation of the artefact. We aim to achieve two broad objectives: first, to examine some particular political and social aspects of evaluation processes in organisations; and secondly, to show the potential contribution of employing the notion of 'relevant social groups', a concept adopted from the social shaping of technology approach. By using a case study illustration we examine formal evaluations as a mechanism to effect and justify decisions already taken elsewhere and as important resources for supporters of the system to enroll new users and consolidate existing support. The study shows that if enrolment is achieved then the technology will head towards stabilisation and thus 'success'; conversely, an inability to enroll will likely lead to a de-stabilising process, and thus 'failure'. Hence, there is a dialectical process of persuasion by the supporters on the one hand, and a response from the would-be users on the other. Finally, conclusions are drawn as we highlight the contribution of 'relevant social groups' to our understanding of the process of IS evaluation.

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