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  • 1.
    Dietrich, Marcelo O.
    et al.
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Departamento de Bioquimica, ICBS.
    Souza, DO
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Departamento de Bioquimica, ICBS.
    Portela, LV
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Departamento de Bioquimica, ICBS.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Sojka, Peter
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine, Umeå univesity.
    Serum S100B protein: what does it mean during exercise?2004In: Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 1050-642X, E-ISSN 1536-3724, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 368-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Pauelsen, Mascha
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Nyberg, Gusten
    Department of Radiology, Linköping University Hospital.
    Tegner, Cecilia
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Concussion in ice hockey: A Cohort Study Across 29 Seasons2017In: Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 1050-642X, E-ISSN 1536-3724, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 283-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyse the concussion incidence rate ratios (IRR) across 29 seasons in a Swedish Hockey League team.Design: Cohort study over 29 seasons within one Swedish elite series ice hockey team. Participants: All players who were part of one Swedish elite ice hockey team during the research period gave consent for participation in the study.Independent Variables: Exposure to top level Swedish ice hockey. Main Outcome Measures: Incidence rate ratio for concussion as well as rehabilitation periods due to concussion were calculated and analysed.Results: During the research period, 267 players in total were part of the team. A total of 1638 traumatic injuries were registered of which 162 were concussions. Incidence rates ranged from 0/1,000 games during the first season to 118/1,000 games for the final recorded season. The incidence rate ratio was 1.06 (CI = 1.03-1.10) for the entire research period. A shift towards longer rehabilitation periods was discovered.Conclusions: This study showed a significant increase of concussion incidence rate and a trend towards longer rehabilitation periods due to concussion. Possible risk factors were discussed. Risk behaviour and rehabilitation protocols should be prioritized areas in the research of concussion in ice hockey. 

  • 3.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Sojka, Peter
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Playing ice hockey and basketball increases serum levels of S-100B in elite players: a pilot study2003In: Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 1050-642X, E-ISSN 1536-3724, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 292-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate changes in serum concentrations of the biochemical markers of brain damage S-100B and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) in ice hockey and basketball players during games. DESIGN: Descriptive clinical research. SETTING: Competitive games of the Swedish Elite Ice Hockey League and the Swedish Elite Basketball League. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-six male ice hockey players (from two teams) and 18 basketball players (from two teams). INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: S-100B and NSE were analyzed using two-site immunoluminometric assays. The numbers of acceleration/deceleration events were assessed from videotape recordings of the games. Head trauma-related symptoms were monitored 24 hours after the game using the Rivermead Post Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire. RESULTS: Changes in serum concentrations of S-100B (postgame - pregame values) were statistically significant after both games (ice hockey, 0.072 +/- 0.108 microg/L, P = 0.00004; basketball, 0.076 +/- 0.091 microg/L, P = 0.001). In basketball, there was a significant correlation between the change in S-100B (postgame-pregame values) and jumps, which were the most frequent acceleration/deceleration (r = 0.706, P = 0.002). For NSE, no statistically significant change in serum concentration was found in either game. For one ice hockey player who experienced concussion during play, S-100B was increased more than for the other players. CONCLUSIONS: S-100B was released into the blood of the players as a consequence of game-related activities and events. Analysis of the biochemical brain damage markers (in particular S-100B) seems to have the potential to become a valuable additional tool for assessment of the degree of brain tissue damage in sport-related head trauma and probably for decision making about returning to play.

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