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  • 1.
    Bansal, Namita
    et al.
    DOE-Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
    Bhalla, Aditya
    DOE-Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
    Pattathil, Sivakumar
    University of Georgia, Complex Carbohydrate Research Center, University of Georgia, Athens, GA.
    Adelman, Sara L.
    DOE-Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
    Hahn, Michael G
    University of Georgia, Complex Carbohydrate Research Center, University of Georgia, Athens, GA.
    Hodge, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Hegg, Eric L.
    Michigan State University, DOE-Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison.
    Cell wall-associated transition metals improve alkaline-oxidative pretreatment in diverse hardwoods2016In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 1405-1415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The responses of four diverse hardwoods (hybrid poplar, silver birch, hybrid aspen, and sugar maple) to alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreated at ambient temperature and pressure were analyzed to gain a deeper understanding of the cell wall properties that contribute to differences in enzymatic hydrolysis efficacy following alkaline-oxidative pretreatment. The enzymatic hydrolysis yields of these diverse hardwoods increased significantly with increasing the cell wall-associated, redox-active transition metal content. These increases in hydrolysis yields were directly correlated with improved delignification. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these improvements in hydrolysis yields could be achieved either through elevated levels of naturally-occurring metals, namely Cu, Fe, and Mn, or by the addition of a homogeneous transition metal catalyst (e.g. Cu 2,2′-bipyridine complexes) capable of penetrating into the cell wall matrix. Removal of naturally-occurring cell wall-associated transition metals by chelation resulted in substantial decreases in the hydrolysis yields following AHP pretreatment, while re-addition of metals in the form of Cu 2,2′-bipyridine complexes and to a limited extent Fe 2,2′-bipyridine complexes prior to pretreatment restored the improved hydrolysis yields. Glycome profiles showed improved extractability of xylan, xyloglucan, and pectin epitopes with increasing hydrolysis yields for the diverse hardwoods subjected to the alkaline-oxidative pretreatment, demonstrating that the strength of association between cell wall matrix polymers decreased as a consequence of improved delignification

  • 2.
    Liu, Yanrong
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. CAS Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Ionic Liquids Clean Process, State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, PR China .
    Nie, Yi
    CAS Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Ionic Liquids Clean Process, State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, PR China .
    Lu, Xingmei
    CAS Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Ionic Liquids Clean Process, State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, PR China .
    Zhang, Xiangping
    CAS Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Ionic Liquids Clean Process, State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, PR China .
    He, Hongyan
    CAS Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Ionic Liquids Clean Process, State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, PR China .
    Pan, Fengjiao
    CAS Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Ionic Liquids Clean Process, State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, PR China .
    Zhou, Le
    CAS Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Ionic Liquids Clean Process, State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, PR China .
    Liu, Xue
    CAS Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Ionic Liquids Clean Process, State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, PR China .
    Ji, Xiaoyan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Zhang, Suojiang
    CAS Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Ionic Liquids Clean Process, State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, PR China .
    Cascade utilization of lignocellulosic biomass to high-value products2019In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 21, no 13, p. 3499-3535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a potential sustainable feedstock to replace fossil fuels. However, the complex structure of biomass makes it difficult to convert into high-value products. Utilization of lignocellulosic biomass in a green and effective way is of great significance for sustainable development. Based on the analysis of different options, we proposed that cascade utilization according to its composition, characteristics, and nature is the best way to utilize the lignocellulosic biomass. To promote the cascade utilization of lignocellulosic biomass, this article provides a review of the latest research results from the aspect of cascade utilization of lignocellulosic biomass covering the whole chain from pretreatment to high-value products, and the research on the non-conventional pretreatments including microwave irradiation, supercritical fluids, ultrasonic irradiation, electric field, hydrodynamic cavitation, and ionic liquids are presented in detail and evaluated by 4 proposed levels, and the newly developed high-value applications were further overviewed for lignin (carbon/graphene/carbon nano-tubes, dye dispersants, bioplastics, and aerogels), cellulose (cellulose-based ionic liquids, functional composites, adsorbent materials, carbon, and aerogels), and hemicellulose (films and pharmaceutical carriers), respectively. Finally, perspectives on the future research on the cascade utilization of lignocellulosic biomass are highlighted.

  • 3.
    Pathak, Uma
    et al.
    Synthetic Chemistry Division, Defence R and D Establishment.
    Bhattacharyya, Shubhankar
    Dhruwansh, Vishwanath
    ynthetic Chemistry Division, Defence R and D Establishment.
    Pandey, Lokesh Kumar
    Synthetic Chemistry Division, Defence R and D Establishment.
    Tank, Rekha
    Synthetic Chemistry Division, Defence R and D Establishment.
    Suryanarayana, Malladi Venkata Satya
    Synthetic Chemistry Division, Defence R and D Establishment.
    An easy access to thiazolines and thiazines via tandem S-alkylation- cyclodeamination of thioamides/haloamines2011In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 13, no 7, p. 1648-1651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the first report of a facile synthesis of thiazolines and thiazines from a self-catalyzed, water assisted tandem S-alkylation-cyclodeamination reaction of thioamides/haloamines. The reaction is clean and efficient with simple product work-up, and is applicable to a variety of substrates

  • 4.
    Phongpreecha, Thanaphong
    et al.
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA.
    Hool, Nicholas C.
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA.
    Stoklosa, Ryan J.
    Sustainable Biofuels and Co-Products Research Unit, Eastern Regional Research Center, USDA, ARS, 600 East Mermaid Lane, Wyndmoor, USA.
    Klett, Adam S.
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, USA.
    Foster, Cliff E.
    DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA.
    Bhalla, Aditya
    DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA.
    Holmes, Daniel
    Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA.
    Thies, Mark C.
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, USA.
    Hodge, David B.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman, USA.
    Predicting lignin depolymerization yields from quantifiable properties using fractionated biorefinery lignins2017In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 19, no 21, p. 5131-5143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin depolymerization to aromatic monomers with high yields and selectivity is essential for the economic feasibility of many lignin-valorization strategies within integrated biorefining processes. Importantly, the quality and properties of the lignin source play an essential role in impacting the conversion chemistry, yet this relationship between lignin properties and lignin susceptibility to depolymerization is not well established. In this study, we quantitatively demonstrate how the detrimental effect of a pretreatment process on the properties of lignins, particularly β-O-4 content, limit high yields of aromatic monomers using three lignin depolymerization approaches: thioacidolysis, hydrogenolysis, and oxidation. Through pH-based fractionation of alkali-solubilized lignin from hybrid poplar, this study demonstrates that the properties of lignin, namely β-O-4 linkages, phenolic hydroxyl groups, molecular weight, and S/G ratios exhibit strong correlations with each other even after pretreatment. Furthermore, the differences in these properties lead to discernible trends in aromatic monomer yields using the three depolymerization techniques. Based on the interdependency of alkali lignin properties and its susceptibility to depolymerization, a model for the prediction of monomer yields was developed and validated for depolymerization by quantitative thioacidolysis. These results highlight the importance of the lignin properties for their suitability for an ether-cleaving depolymerization process, since the theoretical monomer yields grows as a second order function of the β-O-4 content. Therefore, this research encourages and provides a reference tool for future studies to identify new methods for lignin-first biomass pretreatment and lignin valorization that emphasize preservation of lignin qualities, apart from focusing on optimization of reaction conditions and catalyst selection.

  • 5.
    Tank, Rekha
    et al.
    Synthetic Chemistry Division, Defence R and D Establishment.
    Pathak, Uma
    Synthetic Chemistry Division, Defence R and D Establishment.
    Vimal, Manorama
    Synthetic Chemistry Division, Defence R and D Establishment.
    Bhattacharyya, Shubhankar
    Synthetic Chemistry Division, Defence R and D Establishment.
    Pandey, Lokesh Kumar
    Synthetic Chemistry Division, Defence R and D Establishment.
    Hydrogen peroxide mediated efficient amidation and esterification of aldehydes: Scope and selectivity2011In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 3350-3354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient method for the amidation and esterification of aldehydes utilizing hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant has been developed. Cyclic amines and primary alcohols selectively reacted with aromatic aldehydes under mild conditions to yield the corresponding amides and esters

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