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  • 1.
    Berezovsky, Vladimir
    et al.
    Department of Applied Mathematics and High-performance ComputingM.V.Lomonosov Northern (Arctic) Federal University, Arkhangelsk.
    Öberg, Sven
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Computational study of the CO adsorption and diffusion in zeolites: validating the Reed–Ehrlich model2018In: Adsorption, ISSN 0929-5607, E-ISSN 1572-8757, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 403-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular simulations have been employed to explore at the microscopic scale the adsorption of CO in zeolites (MFI, CHA and DDR). On the basis of classical force fields, grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are performed to predict the adsorption properties (isotherms) of these types of zeolites up to high pressure. Subsequent careful analysis yields details the microscopic mechanism in play, along the whole adsorption process, together with a considering of the arrangements of CO in MFI at high pressure. This work also summarizes an approach which uses single component diffusion data in prediction of multicomponent diffusion.

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  • 2.
    Faisal, Abrar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Zarebska, Agata
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Saremi, Pardis
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Korelskiy, Danil
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Ohlin, Lindsay
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Grahn, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    MFI zeolite as adsorbent for selective recovery of hydrocarbons from ABE fermentation broths2014In: Adsorption, ISSN 0929-5607, E-ISSN 1572-8757, Vol. 20, no 2-3, p. 465-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1-Butanol and butyric acid are two interesting compounds that may be produced by acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation using e.g. Clostridium acetobutylicum. The main drawback, restricting the commercialization potential of this process, is the toxicity of butanol for the cell culture resulting in low concentrations of this compound in the broth. To make this process economically viable, an efficient recovery process has to be developed. In this work, a hydrophobic MFI type zeolite with high silica to alumina ratio was evaluated as adsorbent for the recovery of butanol and butyric acid from model solutions. Dual component adsorption experiments revealed that both butanol and butyric acid showed a high affinity for the hydrophobic MFI zeolite when adsorbed from aqueous model solutions. Multicomponent adsorption experiments using model solutions, mimicking real fermentation broths, revealed that the adsorbent was very selective to the target compounds. Further, the adsorption of butyric and acetic acid was found to be pH dependent with high adsorption below, and low adsorption above, the respective pKa values of the acids. Thermal desorption of butanol from MFI type zeolite was also studied and a suitable desorption temperature was identified.

  • 3.
    Faisal, Abrar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Zhou, Ming
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Grahn, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Recovery of butanol from model ABE fermentation broths using MFI adsorbent: a comparison between traditional beads and a structured adsorbent in the form of a film2016In: Adsorption, ISSN 0929-5607, E-ISSN 1572-8757, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 205-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Butanol, a promising biofuel, can be produced by ABE (acetone, butanol and ethanol) fermentation using e.g. Clostridium acetobutylicum. However, the butanol concentration in the resulting broth is limited to only ca. 20 g/L due to the toxicity for the microorganisms. This low product concentration demands an efficient recovery process for successful commercialization of this process. In this study, a structured adsorbent in the form of steel monolith coated with a silicalite-1 film was prepared using the in situ growth method. The adsorbent was carefully characterized by SEM and XRD. The performance of the adsorbent was evaluated by performing breakthrough experiments at room temperature using model ABE fermentation broths and the performance was compared with that of traditional adsorbents in the form of beads. The structured silicalite-1 adsorbent showed less saturation loading time as compared to commercial binder free silicalite-1 beads, reflecting the different dimensions of the columns used, set by experimental constraints. Studies of the desorption process showed that by operating at appropriate conditions, butanol with high concentration i.e. up to 95.2 wt% for butanol–water model system and 88.5 wt% for ABE fermentation broth can be obtained using the structured silicalite-1 adsorbent. Commercial silicalite-1 beads also showed good selectivity but the concentration of butanol in the desorbed product was limited to 70 % for the butanol–water model system and 69 % for ABE fermentation broth, probably as a result of entrained liquid between the beads.

  • 4. Mosca, Alessandra
    et al.
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Ridha, F.N.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University.
    Webley, P.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University.
    Optimization of synthesis procedures for structured PSA adsorbents2008In: Adsorption, ISSN 0929-5607, E-ISSN 1572-8757, Vol. 14, no 4-5, p. 687-693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Structured adsorbents in the form of supported thin zeolite films may represent a competitive alternative to traditional zeolite adsorbents in form of beads or pellets used in PSA processes, due to the reduction of mass- and heat-transfer limitations typical of packed beds. Thin NaX films were grown by hydrothermal treatment using a clear solution on cordierite monoliths. Films grown by a multiple synthesis procedure were dense and uniform with a very small amount of sediments adjacent to the film, which may be an advantage in PSA applications. The CO2 adsorption capacity and the pressure drop for the supported films were compared to those of a packed NaX bed. Although the adsorption capacity of the column filled with the structured adsorbents was 67 times lower than when the column was filled with zeolite beads, the pressure drop was 100 times lower for the structured adsorbent. The adsorption capacity can be increased by increasing the film thickness or the cell density of the monoliths without increasing the pressure drop significantly, indicating the potential advantage of structured adsorbents in PSA processes. Further investigations are needed in order to prove this hypothesis.

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