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  • 1.
    Cao, Zhejian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Akhtar, Farid
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Porous Strontium Chloride Scaffolded by Graphene Networks as Ammonia Carriers2021In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 31, no 30, article id 2008505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strontium chloride (SrCl2) as ammonia (NH3) carriers has been widely exploited due to its high ammonia uptake capacity and low energy penalty for ammonia release. However, the dramatic volume swing during absorption–desorption cycles, from SrCl2 to Sr(NH3)8Cl2 to SrCl2, imposes a challenge to structure SrCl2 for ammonia storage applications. Herein, a novel porous SrCl2 structure with SrCl2 loading up to 96 wt%, scaffolded by reduced graphene oxide (rGO) networks is reported. The optimized porous SrCl2‐rGO composite with 80 wt% SrCl2 loading maintains the macro‐ and micro‐structure accommodating the volume swing during ammonia absorption–desorption cycles without disintegration, whereas structured SrCl2 pellets disintegrates directly after the first cycle of NH3 absorption. The structured porous 80 wt% SrCl2‐rGO composite demonstrates rapid absorption–desorption kinetics, 140% faster in absorption and 540% faster in desorption compared with pure SrCl2 pellet. The enhancement of the surface area and the presence of SrCl2 particles in the pores of rGO networks result in a robust and stable structure offering rapid ammonia absorption–desorption kinetics while countermining the volume swing by self‐adjusting “breathing.”

  • 2.
    Di Maria, Francesca
    et al.
    Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e Fotoreattivita' (ISOF), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche.
    Zangoli, Mattia G.
    Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e Fotoreattivita' (ISOF), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche.
    Gazzano, Massimo
    Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e Fotoreattivita' (ISOF), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche.
    Fabiano, Eduardo
    Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems (CNR-IMM).
    Gentili, Denis
    Istituto per lo studio dei Materiali, Nanostrutturati (ISMN), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche.
    Zanelli, Alberto
    Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e Fotoreattivita' (ISOF), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche.
    Fermi, Andrea
    School of Chemistry, Cardiff University.
    Bergamini, Giacomo
    Department of Chemistry Giacomo Ciamician, University of Bologna.
    Bonifazi, Davide
    School of Chemistry, Cardiff University.
    Perinot, Andrea
    Center for Nano Science and Technology@PoliMi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia.
    Caironi, Mario
    Center for Nano Science and Technology@PoliMi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia.
    Mazzaro, Raffaello
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Istituto per la Microelettronica e i Microsistemi (IMM), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche.
    Morandi, Vittorio
    Istituto per la Microelettronica e i Microsistemi (IMM), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche.
    Gigli, Giuseppe
    Department of Mathematics and Physics, Ennio De Giorgi University of Salento, Lecce.
    Liscio, Andrea
    Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems (CNR-IMM).
    Barbarella, Giovanna
    Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e Fotoreattivita' (ISOF), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche.
    Controlling the Functional Properties of Oligothiophene Crystalline Nano/Microfibers via Tailoring of the Self-Assembling Molecular Precursors2018In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 28, no 32, article id 1801946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oligothiophenes are π-conjugated semiconducting and fluorescent molecules whose self-assembly properties are widely investigated for application in organic electronics, optoelectronics, biophotonics, and sensing. Here an approach to the preparation of crystalline oligothiophene nano/microfibers is reported based on the use of a “sulfur overrich” quaterthiophene building block, T4S4 , containing in its covalent network all the information needed to promote the directional, π–π stacking-driven, self-assembly of Y-T4S4-Y oligomers into fibers with hierarchical supramolecular arrangement from nano- to microscale. It is shown that when Y varies from unsubstituted thiophene to thiophene substituted with electron-withdrawing groups, a wide redistribution of the molecular electronic charge takes place without substantially affecting the aggregation modalities of the oligomer. In this way, a structurally comparable series of fibers is obtained having progressively varying optical properties, redox potentials, photoconductivity, and type of prevailing charge carriers (from p- to n-type). With the aid of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, combined with powder X-ray diffraction data, a model accounting for the growth of the fibers from molecular to nano- and microscale is proposed

  • 3.
    Ibupoto, Zafar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Dr. M.A Kazi Institute of Chemistry University of Sindh Jamshoro,Sindh, Pakistan.
    Tahira, Aneela
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Tang, PengYi
    Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), CSIC and BIST, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain;Catalonia Institute for Energy Research (IREC), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Morante, Joan Ramon
    Catalonia Institute for Energy Research (IREC), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Arbiol, Jordi
    Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), CSIC and BIST, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain;ICREA, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    MoSx@NiO Composite Nanostructures: An Advanced Nonprecious Catalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Media2019In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 29, no 7, article id 1807562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of the earth‐abundant, nonprecious, efficient, and stable electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline media is a hot research topic in the field of renewable energies. A heterostructured system composed of MoSx deposited on NiO nanostructures (MoSx@NiO) as a robust catalyst for water splitting is proposed here. NiO nanosponges are applied as cocatalyst for MoS2 in alkaline media. Both NiO and MoS2@NiO composites are prepared by a hydrothermal method. The NiO nanostructures exhibit sponge‐like morphology and are completely covered by the sheet‐like MoS2. The NiO and MoS2 exhibit cubic and hexagonal phases, respectively. In the MoSx@NiO composite, the HER experiment in 1 m KOH electrolyte results in a low overpotential (406 mV) to produce 10 mA cm−2 current density. The Tafel slope for that case is 43 mV per decade, which is the lowest ever achieved for MoS2‐based electrocatalyst in alkaline media. The catalyst is highly stable for at least 13 h, with no decrease in the current density. This simple, cost‐effective, and environmentally friendly methodology can pave the way for exploitation of MoSx@NiO composite catalysts not only for water splitting, but also for other applications such as lithium ion batteries, and fuel cells.

  • 4.
    Li, Jiajia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. CAS Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Ionic Liquids Clean Process, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 China.
    Hu, Haiman
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Fang, Wenhao
    CAS Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Ionic Liquids Clean Process, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 China.
    Ding, Junwei
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Yuan, Du
    College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changsha University of Science and Technology, 960, 2nd Section, Wanjiali RD (S), Changsha, Hunan, 410004 China.
    Luo, Shuangjiang
    CAS Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Ionic Liquids Clean Process, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 China.
    Zhang, Haitao
    CAS Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Ionic Liquids Clean Process, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 China.
    Ji, Xiaoyan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Impact of Fluorine‐Based Lithium Salts on SEI for All‐Solid‐State PEO‐Based Lithium Metal Batteries2023In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 33, no 38, article id 2303718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    LiF-rich solid-electrolyte-interphase (SEI) can suppress the formation of lithium dendrites and promote the reversible operation of lithium metal batteries. Regulating the composition of naturally formed SEI is an effective strategy, while understanding the impact and role of fluorine (F)-based Li-salts on the SEI characteristics is unavailable. Herein, LiFSI, LiTFSI, and LiPFSI are selected to prepare solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) with poly(ethylene oxide) and polyimide, investigating the effects of molecular size, F contents and chemical structures (F-connecting bonds) of Li-salts and revealing the formation of LiF in the SEI. It is shown that the F-connecting bond is more significant than the molecular size and F element contents, and thus the performances of cells using LiPFSI are slightly better than LiTFSI and much better than LiFSI. The SPE containing LiPFSI can generate a high amount of LiF, and SPEs containing LiPFSI and LiTFSI can generate Li3N, while there is no Li3N production in the SEI for the SPE containing LiFSI. The preferential breakage bonds in LiPFSI are related to its position to Li anode, where Li-metal as the anode is important in forming LiF, and consequently the LiPFSI reduction mechanism is proposed. This study will boost other energy storage systems beyond Li-ion chemistries.

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  • 5.
    Li, Ruiyun
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Science Lanzhou 70000 China; Institute of Materials Science and Engineering Lanzhou University Lanzhou 730000 China.
    Yang, Xing
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Science Lanzhou 70000 China.
    Zhao, Jun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Yue, Chengtao
    School of Nuclear Science and Technology University of South China Hengyang 421001 China.
    Wang, Yongfu
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Science Lanzhou 70000 China.
    Li, Jiangong
    Institute of Materials Science and Engineering Lanzhou University Lanzhou 730000 China.
    Meyer, Ernst
    Department of Physics University of Basel Klingelbergstrasse 82 Basel 4056 Switzerland.
    Zhang, Junyan
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Science Lanzhou 70000 China;Center of Materials Science and Optoelectronics Engineering University of Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing 100049 China.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Operando Formation of Van der Waals Heterostructures for Achieving Macroscale Superlubricity on Engineering Rough and Worn Surfaces2022In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 32, no 18, article id 2111365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Macroscale superlubricity breakdown of lubricating materials caused by substrate surface roughening and mechanochemical modification poses great challenges for their practical tribological applications. Here, a facile way is reported to access robust macroscale superlubricity in a vacuum environment, via the operando formation of graphene/transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) heterostructures at wear-induced rough surfaces. By trapping active amorphous carbon (a-C) wear products between TMDC flakes, the sandwich structures readily transform into graphene/TMDC heterostructures during running-in stage, based on shear-induced confinement and load-driven graphitization effects. Then they assemble into multipoint flake-like tribofilms to achieve macroscale superlubricity at steady stage by reducing contact area, eliminating strong cross-interface carbon–carbon interactions and polishing a-C rough nascent surface. Atomistic simulations reveal the preferential formation of graphene/TMDC heterostructures during running-in stage and demonstrate the superlubric sliding of TMDCs on the graphene. The findings are of importance to achieve robust superlubricity and provide a good strategy for the synthesis of other van der Waals heterostructures.

  • 6.
    Liccardo, Letizia
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Via Torino 155, 30172, Venezia Mestre, Italy.
    Bordin, Matteo
    Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Via Torino 155, 30172, Venezia Mestre, Italy.
    Sheverdyaeva, Polina M.
    Istituto di Struttura della Materia-CNR (ISM-CNR), SS 14, Km 163.5, 34149, Trieste, Italy.
    Belli, Matteo
    CNR-IMM, Unit of Agrate Brianza, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864, Agrate Brianza, Italy.
    Moras, Paolo
    Istituto di Struttura della Materia-CNR (ISM-CNR), SS 14, Km 163.5, 34149, Trieste, Italy.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Via Torino 155, 30172, Venezia Mestre, Italy.
    Moretti, Elisa
    Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Via Torino 155, 30172, Venezia Mestre, Italy.
    Surface Defect Engineering in Colored TiO2 Hollow Spheres Toward Efficient Photocatalysis2023In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 33, no 22, article id 2212486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanostructured TiO2 is one of the best materials for photocatalysis, thanks to its high surface area and surface reactivity, but its large energy bandgap (3.2 eV) hinders the use of the entire solar spectrum. Here, it is proposed that defect-engineered nanostructured TiO2 photocatalysts are obtained by hydrogenation strategy to extend its light absorption up to the near-infrared region. It is demonstrated that hydrogenated or colored TiO2 hollow spheres (THS) composed of hierarchically assembled nanoparticles result in much broader exploitation of the solar spectrum (up to 1200 nm) and the engineered surface enhances the photogeneration of charges for photocatalytic processes. In turn, when applied for photodegradation of a targeted drug (Ciprofloxacin) this results in 82% degradation after 6 h under simulated sunlight. Valence band analysis by photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the presence of oxygen vacancies, whose surface density increases with the hydrogenation rate. Thus, a tight correlation between degree of hydrogenation and photocatalytic activity is directly established. Further insight comes from electron paramagnetic resonance, which evidences bulk Ti3+ centers only in hydrogenated THS. The results are anticipated to disclose a new path toward highly efficient photocatalytic titania in a series of applications targeting water remediation and solar fuel production.

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  • 7.
    Mondal, Aniruddha
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Via Torino 155, Venezia Mestre, 30172 Italy.
    2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenides‐Based Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction2022In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 32, no 52, article id 2208994Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogen is an efficient, clean, and economical energy source, owing to its huge energy density. Electrochemical water splitting is a potential candidate for inexpensive and eco-friendly hydrogen production. Recently, the development of 2D transition metal chalcogenides (TMDs) nanomaterials with a variety of physicochemical properties has shown their potential as eminent non-noble metal-based nanoscale electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution. Nanostructuring such materials induces deep modification of their functionalities, compared to their bulk counterparts. High density of different types of exposed active sites is formed, and the small diffusion paths, which enhances the electron transfer in the 2D structures, can successfully aid the charge collection process in the electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reactions. In this review, the key parameters to improve the catalyst performance of 2D TMDs in electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) processes are discussed in detail and the most recent developments in the field are summarized, focusing on the improvement of the electrocatalytic activity of 2D TMDs. This review delivers deep insight for the clear understanding of the potential of 2D TMDs nanoscale materials as electrocatalysts for HER, suggesting the development of new type of catalyst with efficient activity in HER as well as other renewable energy fields.

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  • 8.
    Yusupov, Khabib
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Functional Nanosystems and High-Temperature Materials National University of Science and Technology MISIS Moscow.
    Stumpf, Steffi
    Laboratory of Organic and Macromolecular Chemistry (IOMC), Friedrich Schiller University Jena.
    You, Shujie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Bogach, Aleksei
    Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences.
    Martinez, Patricia M.
    NanoTech Institute University of Texas at Dallas Richardson .
    Zakhidov, Anvar
    Department of Functional Nanosystems and High-Temperature Materials National University of Science and Technology MISIS Moscow.
    Schubert, Ulrich S.
    Laboratory of Organic and Macromolecular Chemistry (IOMC), Friedrich Schiller University Jena.
    Khovaylo, Vladimir V.
    Department of Functional Nanosystems and High-Temperature Materials National University of Science and Technology MISIS Moscow.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Flexible Thermoelectric Polymer Composites Based on a Carbon Nanotubes Forest2018In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 28, no 40, article id 1801246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymer-based composites are of high interest in the field of thermoelectric (TE) materials because of their properties: abundance, low thermal conductivity, and nontoxicity. In applications, like TE for wearable energy harvesting, where low operating temperatures are required, polymer composites demonstrate compatible with the targeted specifications. The main challenge is reaching high TE efficiency. Fillers and chemical treatments can be used to enhance TE performance of the polymer matrix. The combined application of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes forest (VA-CNTF) is demonstrated as fillers and chemical post-treatment to obtain high-efficiency TE composites, by dispersing VA-CNTF into a poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate matrix. The VA-CNTF keeps the functional properties even in flexible substrates. The morphology, structure, composition, and functional features of the composites are thoroughly investigated. A dramatic increase of power factor is observed at the lowest operating temperature difference ever reported. The highest Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity are 58.7 μV K-1 and 1131 S cm-1, respectively. The highest power factor after treatment is twice as high in untreated samples. The results demonstrate the potential for the combined application of VA-CNTF and chemical post-treatment, in boosting the TE properties of composite polymers toward the development of high efficiency, low-temperature, flexible TEs.

  • 9.
    Yusupov, Khabib
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Via Torino 155, Venezia Mestre, 30172 Italy.
    Polymer‐Based Low‐Temperature Thermoelectric Composites2020In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 30, no 52, article id 2002015Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermoelectric materials allow direct conversion of waste heat energy into electrical energy, thus contributing to solving energy related issues. Polymer‐based materials have been considered for use in heat conversion in the temperature range from 20 to 200 °C, within which conventional materials are not efficient enough, whereas polymers due to their good electronic transport properties, easy processability, non‐toxicity, flexibility, abundance, and simplicity of adjustment, are considered as promising materials. Due to the large variety of available polymers and the almost unlimited combinations of possible modifications, the field of polymer‐based thermoelectrics is very rapidly developing, already reaching efficiency values close to those of inorganic systems. In the current progress report, the most recent advances in the field are discussed. New approaches to improve thermoelectric performance are described, with a focus on revising the mechanisms to improve the thermoelectric properties of the three most investigated polymer matrixes: poly(3,4‐ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonat, poly(3‐hexylthiophene‐2,5‐diyl), and polyaniline, alongside the three main paths of optimizing properties: incorporation of carbon‐based material and inorganic substances, and treatment with chemical agents. The most promising research in the field is highlighted and thoroughly analyzed. The path toward a lab‐to‐fab transition for thermoelectric polymers is suggested in perspective.

  • 10.
    Zhao, Jun
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Boosting the Durability of Triboelectric Nanogenerators: A Critical Review and Prospect2023In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 33, no 14, article id 2213407Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) have attracted great interests in the development of sustainable energies and intelligent society. However, a big challenge for TENGs in practical applications is the unavoidable external mechanical abrasion and/or contaminant adsorption on the triboelectric materials, which leads to the significant decrease of the durability of TENGs and is urgently needed to be addressed. There are already a series of interesting progresses on the topic of the TENGs’ durability. In this study, reviewing the durability of TENGs via both the advanced materials/structure designing and the novel surface/interface engineering is focused upon, which includes choosing basic TENG materials, improving composites performance, optimizing structures, and designing triboelectric surfaces and interfaces. To get a better understanding of the durability of TENGs in published studies, the quantifiable levels of service life are also summarized including operation cycles, time, friction coefficient, and wear loss of triboelectric materials, where the boosting mechanisms are also discussed and summarized. Finally, the challenges as well as key strategies toward high durable TENGs are presented.

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  • 11.
    Zhou, Ming
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Yu, Liang
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Ultrathin DDR Films with Exceptionally High CO2 Flux and Uniformly Adjustable Orientations2022In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 32, no 18, article id 2112427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin and oriented zeolite films are important for advanced separations, catalysis, and sensing. Strategies for tailoring zeolites for applications include controlling their crystal size, shape, and orientation. Here, three siliceous DDR zeolite ultrathin films with different orientations achieved by homoepitaxial growth from 60 nm-sized seed particles are reported. The 0.5 µm thick membrane shows a separation selectivity of 400 for CO2–CH4 mixtures and CO2 permeance of 25 × 10-7 mol m-2 s-1 Pa-1 at 20 °C and 1 bar, leading to a record-high performance among all reported DDR membranes. Furthermore, the seed nanoparticles are grown into mono-dispersed DDR sub-micron crystals with trigonal and tabular habits. These crystals are assembled in monolayers for the growth of ultrathin and uniformly (h0h)-oriented and c-oriented films with maximum surface pore diameter of 0.365 and 0.263 nm, respectively, by using the 1-adamantanamine template in fluoride medium. The novel strategy not only provides high-performance membrane candidates for industrial CO2 separation, but also inspires interfacial engineering, pore size, and orientation controlling for other microporous crystals, and their membranes.

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