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  • 1.
    Glauser, Thierry
    et al.
    Department of Polymer Technology, Royal Institute of Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    Department of Polymer Technology, Royal Institute of Technology.
    Johansson, Mats
    Department of Polymer Technology, Royal Institute of Technology.
    Kornmann, Xavier
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Toughening of electron-beam cured acrylate resins2000In: Macromolecular materials and engineering, ISSN 1438-7492, E-ISSN 1439-2054, Vol. 280-281, no 1, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to improve the toughness of EB-cured acrylate thermoset resins by using hyperbranched aliphatic polyesters as additives to obtain a liquid-liquid phase-separated resin. The hyperbranched polyester can be considered as a hydroxyl functional scaffold, on which functional groups were reacted to control phase separation and crosslinking. Alkyl chains of different lengths attached to the scaffold controlled phase separation. The amount of crosslinking within the rubbery particle and between the particles and the matrix was set by the percentage of methacrylate groups. A good phase separation was obtained; therefore, Tg decreased only slightly compared to the pure acrylate. The KIC value of the cured resins was increased by 30%. The phase-separated resins showed stability with time and no significant increase in particle size was noticed after 18 months.

  • 2.
    Liu, Xiaohui
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Engineering Plastics, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences.
    Wu, Qiuju
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Polyamide 66/clay nanocomposites via melt intercalation2002In: Macromolecular materials and engineering, ISSN 1438-7492, E-ISSN 1439-2054, Vol. 287, no 3, p. 180-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyamide 66/clay nanocomposites (PA66CN) were prepared via a melt compounding method using a new kind of organophilic clay, which was obtained through co-intercalation of epoxy resin and quaternary ammonium into Na-montmorillonite. The dispersion effect of silicate layers in the matrix was studied by means of XRD and TEM. The silicate layers were dispersed homogeneously and nearly exfoliated in the matrix as a result of the strong interaction between epoxy groups and PA66. The mechanical properties and heat distortion temperature (HDT) of PA66CN increased dramatically. The notched Izod impact strength of PA66CN was 50% higher than that of PA66 when the clay loading was 5 wt.-%. Even at 10 wt.-% clay content, the impact strength was still higher than that of PA66. The finely dispersed silicate layers and the strong interaction between silicate layers and the matrix reduced the water absorption, at 10 wt.-% clay content; PA66CN only absorbs 60% water compared with PA66. The addition of silicate layers changed the crystal structure in PA66CN

  • 3.
    Liu, Xiaohui
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Wu, Qiuju
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Qi, Zongneng
    State Key Laboratory of Engineering Plastics, Center for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing.
    Investigation on unusual crystallization behavior in polyamide 6/montmorillonite nanocomposites2002In: Macromolecular materials and engineering, ISSN 1438-7492, E-ISSN 1439-2054, Vol. 287, no 8, p. 515-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The crystallization behavior and crystal structure of polyamide 6/montmorillonite (PA6/MMT) nanocomposites were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction, and an interesting behavior was observed. The material was prepared via melt compounding using an organophilic clay obtained by co-intercalation of epoxy resin and quaternary ammonium into Na-montmorillonite. A maximum in degree of crystallinity was obtained at 5 wt.-% MMT and the reasons for this, based on the MMT layer distribution, were discussed. The degree of crystallinity showed a strong dependence on the cooling rates. In contrast with typical behavior, a higher cooling rate resulted in a higher degree of crystallinity. In nanocomposites, the -crystalline phase was dominant.

  • 4.
    Nordin, Lars-Olof
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Marklund, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Ståhlberg, Daniel
    Royal Institute of Technology, Fibre & Polymer Technology, Stockholm, Sweden;Materials Technology, Scania CV AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Varna, Janis
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Johansson, Mats
    Royal Institute of Technology, Fibre & Polymer Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mechanical response of thermoset polymers under high compressive loads, 22005In: Macromolecular materials and engineering, ISSN 1438-7492, E-ISSN 1439-2054, Vol. 290, no 11, p. 1073-1082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A nonlinear viscoelastic material model was used to describe the experimental behaviour of thin vinyl ester specimens subjected to compression in thickness direction. The stress-dependent material functions in the model were found in creep and strain recovery tests on thick cylindrical specimens. The elastic and creep response of thin thermoset polymer specimens subjected to compressive loads was simulated while varying the geometry of the test set samples. The calculated increase in the apparent elastic modulus and decrease of the creep-strain rate due to reduced thickness-to-width ratio is in a good qualitative correlation with experimental results for corresponding geometries. The constraint due to friction and interaction with the material outside the loaded surface area were identified as the cause for high apparent stiffness, which converges with decreasing thickness to an asymptotic value dependent on the modulus and Poisson's ratio of the material.

  • 5.
    Raja, Pradeep
    et al.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu, 620015, India.
    Murugan, Vignesh
    Department of Civil Engineering, Oriental University, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, 453555, India.
    Ravichandran, Sindhu
    Department of Civil Engineering, Karpagam Academy of Higher Education, Salem – Kochi Hwy, Eachanari, Tamil Nadu, 641021, India.
    Behera, Laxmidhar
    Department of Civil Engineering, Centurion University of Technology and Management, Odisha, 761211, India.
    Mensah, Rhoda Afriyie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Fire Engineering.
    Mani, Satthiyaraju
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kathir College of Engineering, Neelambur, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, 641062, India.
    Kasi, AnanthaKumar
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Karpagam College of Engineering, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, 641032, India.
    Balasubramanian, Karthik Babu Nilagiri
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assam Energy Institute, A Centre of RGIPT, Sivasagar, Assam, 785640, India.
    Sas, Gabriel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Fire Engineering.
    Vahabi, Henri
    University of Lorraine, Centrale Supélec, Laboratoire MOPS E.A. 4423, Metz, F-57070, France.
    Das, Oisik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Fire Engineering.
    A Review of Sustainable Bio-Based Insulation Materials for Energy-Efficient Buildings2023In: Macromolecular materials and engineering, ISSN 1438-7492, E-ISSN 1439-2054, Vol. 308, no 10, article id 2300086Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The surge towards a sustainable future in the construction industry requires the use of bio-based insulation materials as an alternative to conventional ones for improving energy efficiency in structures. In this article, the features of bio-based insulation materials, including their thermal conductivities, moisture buffering value, fire performance, and life cycle evaluations are examined. It is clear from the review that pre- and post-treatment of the bio-based materials used for insulation materials optimize their properties. The life cycle analysis reveals a significant reduction in global warming potential (GWP) compared to conventional foams. In addition, it is envisaged that producing bio-based insulation materials on a larger scale will further decrease the net GWP. The article, therefore, proposes the implementation of policies that will promote the commercialization of bio-based insulation materials.

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    fulltext
  • 6.
    Ståhlberg, Daniel
    et al.
    Materials Technology, Scania CV AB.
    Nordin, Lars-Olof
    Varna, Janis
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Johansson, Mats
    Royal Institute of Technology, Fibre & Polymer Technology, Stockholm.
    Mechanical response of thermoset polymers under high compressive loads, 12005In: Macromolecular materials and engineering, ISSN 1438-7492, E-ISSN 1439-2054, Vol. 290, no 11, p. 1063-1072Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study describes the mechanical response of thermoset polymers under high compressive loads. A well-defined free radically cured vinyl ester resin has been used and studied in six different geometries in order to determine the dependence of apparent mechanical properties on the particular size and shape of a sample. The mechanical response in compression has also been compared to the response in tensile tests. Variation of the film thickness, boundary conditions and loading conditions reveal that there is a significant effect on the mechanical performance (apparent properties) of the polymer. When the thickness-to-width ratio of the sample is reduced in a compression test, the friction between the sample and the compression plates proves to be of great importance. The yield stress increases dramatically when the thickness of the sample is reduced, whereas it decreases when the friction between sample and the compression plate is reduced. The creep decreases when the thickness of the material is reduced and it decreases even more due to reaction of the material surrounding the compressed part of the sample. The described test conditions and observed phenomena will be subject to simulation in Part 2 of this study.

  • 7.
    Vijaybabu, T. R.
    et al.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, GMR Institute of Technology, Rajam, Andra Pradesh, 532127, India.
    Ramesh, T.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu, 620015, India.
    Pandipati, Suman
    Deparment of Mechanical Engineering, Aditya Institute of technology and management, Tekkali, Andhra Pradesh, 532203, India.
    Mishra, Sujit
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Centurion University of Technology and Management, Paralakhemundi, Odisha, 761211, India.
    Sridevi, G.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Centurion University of Technology and Management, Paralakhemundi, Odisha, 761211, India.
    Raja, C Pradeep
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu, 620015, India.
    Mensah, Rhoda Afriyie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Fire Engineering.
    Das, Oisik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Fire Engineering.
    Misra, Manjusri
    School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Albert A. Thornbrough Building, 80 South Ring Road East, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
    Mohanty, Amar
    School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Albert A. Thornbrough Building, 80 South Ring Road East, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
    Karthik Babu, N. B.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assam Energy Institute, A centre of Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Petroleum Technology, Sivasagar, Assam, 785697, India.
    High Thermal Conductivity Polymer Composites Fabrication through Conventional and 3D Printing Processes: State-of-the-Art and Future Trends2023In: Macromolecular materials and engineering, ISSN 1438-7492, E-ISSN 1439-2054, Vol. 308, no 7, article id 2300001Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lifespan and the performance of flexible electronic devices and components are affected by the large accumulation of heat, and this problem must be addressed by thermally conductive polymer composite films. Therefore, the need for the development of high thermal conductivity nanocomposites has a strong role in various applications. In this article, the effect of different particle reinforcements such as single and hybrid form, coated and uncoated particles, and chemically treated particles on the thermal conductivity of various polymers are reviewed and the mechanism behind the improvement of the required properties are discussed. Furthermore, the role of manufacturing processes such as injection molding, compression molding, and 3D printing techniques in the production of high thermal conductivity polymer composites is detailed. Finally, the potential for future research is discussed, which can help researchers to work on the thermal properties enhancement for polymeric materials.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Vouyiouka, Stamatina N.
    et al.
    Laboratory of Polymer Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Zographou, Athens 15780, Greece.
    Topakas, Evangelos
    Laboratory of Biotechnology, BIOtechMASS Unit, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Zographou, Athens 15780, Greece.
    Katsini, Adamantia
    Laboratory of Polymer Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Zographou, Athens 15780, Greece.
    Papaspyrides, Constantine D.
    Laboratory of Polymer Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Zographou, Athens 15780, Greece.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Laboratory of Biotechnology, BIOtechMASS Unit, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Zographou, Athens 15780, Greece.
    A green route for the preparation of aliphatic polyesters via lipase-catalyzed prepolymerization and low-temperature post polymerization2013In: Macromolecular materials and engineering, ISSN 1438-7492, E-ISSN 1439-2054, Vol. 298, no 6, p. 679-689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipase-catalyzed polycondensation of two biobased diacids, 1,12-dodecanedioic acid and 1,14-tetradecanedioic acid, with 1,8-octanediol was achieved using immobilized Lipase B from Candida antarctica. The procedure resulted in partially renewable prepolymers, while poly(octylene adipate) from petroleum-based adipic acid was also synthesized for comparison reasons, revealing a dependence of the enzymatic polymerization degree on monomer composition. The prepolymers were further submitted to bulk postpolymerization at temperatures in the vicinity of their melting point under flowing nitrogen. The intrinsic viscosity increase was found up to 12%, with no significant impact on the polyesters thermal properties.

1 - 8 of 8
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