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  • 1.
    Fjällström, Eva
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Resisting focalisation, gaining empathy: Swedish Teenagers Read Irish Fiction2015In: Children's Literature in Education, ISSN 0045-6713, E-ISSN 1573-1693, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 394-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resisting the will to empathise with a focalised character is assumed to be difficult for young readers, yet empirical evidence on how they actually respond is limited. This paper combines recent insights gleaned from cognitive literary studies with a small-scale empirical study of thirty-five Swedish adolescents reading an Irish short story in order to investigate how teenagers respond to a text which is strongly focalised through a single character. The students were asked to rewrite the events in the story from another character’s point of view. Their texts were coded and analysed, as were follow-up interviews with six students. The findings indicate that Swedish-speaking teenage readers rarely have difficulty resisting focalisation, but they often struggle with irony.

  • 2.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Envisaging ‘Our’ Nation: Politicized Affects in Minority Language Literature2019In: Children's Literature in Education, ISSN 0045-6713, E-ISSN 1573-1693, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 142-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws on two forms of cognitive studies to examine how a minority language literature endeavours to form feelings of in-group belonging. The minority in focus are the Tornedalingar: Swedish nationals who live near the Torne River which marks the border with Finland. The official language of the Tornedalingar is “Meänkieli” which literally translates as “our language”. The first part of the paper draws on the work of Sara Ahmed to show that emotions are both embodied and culturally specific, the second half of the paper takes this argument a step further, drawing on studies of children’s poetry by Karen Coats and Debbie Pullinger to show how the rhythmical patterns of Meänkieli poetry entrain children into a culturally specific sense of belonging.

  • 3.
    Palo, Annbritt
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Manderstedt, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Beyond the Characters and the Reader?: Digital Discussions on Intersectionality in The Murderer’s Ape2019In: Children's Literature in Education, ISSN 0045-6713, E-ISSN 1573-1693, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 125-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an analysis of a recent, award-winning Swedish novel for children and young adults, The Murderer’s Ape by Jakob Wegelius, and digitally published reviews of the novel. In the first part of the paper, we provide an intersectional analysis of the novel, focusing on gender, profession, species and class. The protagonist and narrator of The Murderer’s Ape is not easily categorized, as she is a mute but literate, highly intelligent and technically proficient gorilla in a man’s world; an ape among human beings, a working engineer and not a pet or an attraction at a zoo. Neither class nor social standing constrain her as they do the human fictional characters. In the second part of the paper, we contrast commentaries by professional readers with comments from young readers, paying particular attention to how they have responded to the protagonist. The overarching aim is to examine how features admired by critics and professional readers are, in practice, understood by engaged, active readers, including children. Some intersectional categories represent acquired qualities, whereas others represent socially set boundaries. Posthumanist and intersectional perspectives provide tools to understand Sally Jones’ position beyond both the other fictional characters and the readers. The analyses reveal differences between the readings of gender, profession and class by professional and young readers, but for both categories, the readers’ reactions to questions pertaining to species are pivotal in their readings of the novel.

  • 4. Pavlik, Anthony
    et al.
    Bird, Hazel Sheeky
    Newcastle University.
    Introduction: Maps andMapping in Children’s and Young Adult Literature2017In: Children's Literature in Education, ISSN 0045-6713, E-ISSN 1573-1693, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Yarova, Aliona
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    “I Am the Eternal Green Man”: Holistic Ecology in Reading Patrick Ness’s A Monster Calls2019In: Children's Literature in Education, ISSN 0045-6713, E-ISSN 1573-1693, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Holistic ecology considers nature and society as a whole, viewing humans and the environment as interdependent and interconnected. This article takes the lens of holistic ecology to examine the representation of human–nature relationships in Patrick Ness’s A Monster Calls (2011) and explores how the novel guides the child reader to an environmental mind-set beyond overt didacticism. The article focuses on two aspects of the bond between the magical tree and the human characters in the novel: how the powerful tree empowers humans and how the human characters contribute to the tree’s expressions of power. The eternal Green Man—as the tree introduces itself—embodies this bond by being simultaneously tree-like and human-like, a complex merger of “the Green” (nature) and “the Man” (humanity). The monster-tree fulfils several powerful and empowering roles, such as monster and storyteller, destructive force and powerful healer, savage and philosopher, nightmare and escape. Importantly, it always keeps the shape of a yew tree. As such, A Monster Calls can contribute to children’s environmental education by illustrating the connection between the natural environment and humans: the eternal bond between “the Green” and “the Man.”

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