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  • 1.
    Björling, Marcus
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Bair, Scott
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Centre for High Pressure Rheology, G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Atlanta, GA.
    Mu, Liwen
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Elastohydrodynamic performance of a bio-based, non-corrosive ionic liquid2017In: Applied Sciences: APPS, ISSN 1454-5101, E-ISSN 1454-5101, Vol. 17, no 10, article id 996Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve performance of machine components, lubrication is one of the most important factors. Especially for use in extreme environments, researchers look for other solutions rather than common lubricant base stocks like mineral oils or vegetable oils. One such example is ionic liquids. Ionic liquids have been defined as molten salts with melting points below 100 °C that are entirely ionic in nature, comprising both cationic and anionic species. The industrial use of ionic liquids is mostly as solvents, electrolytes, extractants and catalysts. In tribological applications, ionic liquids are mainly studied in boundary lubrication and in pure sliding contacts. In this work, the elastohydrodynamic performance of a bio-based, non-corrosive, [choline][L-proline] ionic liquid is evaluated in terms of pressure-viscosity response, film forming capability and friction. The results show a pressure-viscosity coefficient of below 8 GPa-1 at 25 °C, among the lowest reported for any ionic liquid. The ionic liquid generated up to 70% lower friction than a reference paraffin oil with a calculated difference in film thickness of 11%. It was also shown that this ionic liquid is very hygroscopic, which is believed to explain part of the low friction results, but also has to be considered in practical applications since the water content will influence the properties and thus the performance of the lubricant.

  • 2.
    Zhaolong, Zhu
    et al.
    College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing.
    Buck, Dietrich
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Guo, Xiaolei
    College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University.
    Pingxiang, Cao
    College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University.
    Ekevad, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Machinability of stone-plastic materials during diamond planing2019In: Applied Sciences: APPS, ISSN 1454-5101, E-ISSN 1454-5101, Vol. 9, no 7, article id 1373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigated the machinability of a stone–plastic composite (SPC) via orthogonal cutting with diamond cutters. The objective was to determine the effect of cutting depth on its machinability, including cutting forces, heat, chip formation, and cutting quality. Increased cutting depth promoted an increase in both frictional and normal forces, and also had a strong influence on the change in normal force. The cutting temperatures of chips and tool edges showed an increasing trend as cutting depth increased. However, the cutting heat was primarily absorbed by chips, with the balance accumulating in the cutting edge. During chip formation, the highest von Mises strain was mainly found in SPC ahead of the cutting edge, and the SPC to be removed partially passed its elastic limit, eventually forming chips with different shapes. Furthermore, the average surface roughness and the mean peak-to-valley height of machined surfaces all positively correlated to an increase in cutting depth. Finally, with an increase in cutting depth, the chip shape changed from tubular, to ribbon, to arc, to segmental, and finally, to helical chips. This evolution in chip shape reduced the fluctuation in cutting force, improving cutting stability and cutting quality.

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