Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Hasselgren, Lotta
    et al.
    Geriatric Centre, Umeå University Hospital.
    Olsson, Lillemor Lundin
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Is leg muscle strength correlated with functional balance and mobility among inpatients in geriatric rehabilitation?2011In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 52, no 3, p. E220-E225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Determinants of previous termfunctional balance and mobilitynext term have rarely been investigated in geriatric wards. This study examined if leg muscle previous termstrengthnext term correlates to previous termfunctional balance and mobilitynext term among geriatric inpatients. Fifty inpatients, 29 women and 21 men (mean age 79.6 years) were included. previous termFunctional balancenext term was assessed with the Berg previous termBalancenext term Scale (BBS) and previous termmobilitynext term was assessed with the Physiotherapy Clinical Outcome Variable Scale (COVS). previous termStrengthnext term in the leg extension muscles was measured as 1 Repetition Maximum (1RM) in a leg press and previous termstrengthnext term in the ankle muscles was measured with Medical Research Council grades (MRC, 0–5). The sum scores, and most of the single items, of the BBS and the COVS significantly previous termcorrelatednext term to 1RM/body weight, ankle dorsiflexion, and plantar flexion. In a stepwise multiple regression, ankle dorsiflexion and 1RM/body weight together accounted for 39% of the variance of the BBS and 41% of the variance of the COVS. Estimated values of the BBS and the COVS can be calculated from the equation. In clinical work, the knowledge about how leg muscle previous termstrengthnext term associates with previous termbalance and mobilitynext term may be useful in analyzing underlying causes of reduced previous termbalance and mobilitynext term function, and in planning rehabilitation programs.

  • 2.
    Lindelöf, Nina
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå university.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Gustafsson, Samuel
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University.
    Nygaars, Joachim
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå university.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Perceptions of participating in high-intensity functional exercise among older people dependent in activities of daily living (ADL)2013In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 369-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate how older people, dependent in ADL perceive their participation in a high-intensity, functional exercise program compared to the perceptions of those participating in a control activity. Forty-eight older people living in residential care facilities answered a questionnaire about their perceptions of participating in an activity for three months. They were aged 65-98, had a mean score of 24 on Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and 14 on Barthel ADL Index. The participants had been randomized to exercise (n = 20) or control activity (n = 28). Differences in responses between exercise and control activity were evaluated using logistic and ordinal regression analyses. The results show that a majority of the exercise group perceived positive changes in lower limb strength, balance, and in the ability to move more safely and securely compared to a minority of the control group (p < 0.001). Significantly more respondents in the exercise activity answered that they felt less tired due to the activity (p = 0.027) and that they prioritized this activity above other activities (p = 0.010). More exercise participants reported that meeting for three months was too short, and fewer that it was too long compared to the control group (p = 0.038). This study shows that older people living in residential care facilities, dependent in ADL, and with mild or no cognitive impairment had positive perceptions about participating in high-intensity functional exercise. The findings support the use of a high-intensity exercise program in this population of older people

  • 3.
    Stenvall, Michael
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå university.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Department of Orthopaedics, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University.
    Lundström, Maria
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå university.
    Svensson, Olle
    Department of Orthopaedics, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå university.
    Inpatient falls and injuries in older patients treated for femoral neck fracture2006In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 389-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A prospective inpatient study was performed at the Orthopedic and Geriatric Departments at the Umea University Hospital, Sweden, to study inpatient falls, fall-related injuries, and risk factors for falls following femoral neck fracture surgery. Ninety-seven patients with femoral neck fracture aged 70 years or older were included, background characteristics, falls, injuries, and other postoperative complications were assessed and registered during the hospitalization. There were 60 postoperative falls among 26/97 patients (27%). The postoperative fall event rate was 16.3/1000 Days (95% CI 12.2-20.4). Thirty two percent of the falls resulted in injuries, 25% minor, and 7% serious ones. In multiple regression analyses, delirium after Day 7, HRR 4.62 (95% CI 1.24-16.37), male sex 3.92 (1.58-9.73), and sleeping disturbances 3.49 (1.24-9.86), were associated with inpatient falls. Forty-five percent of the patients were delirious the day they fell. Intervention programs, including prevention and treatment of delirium and sleeping disturbances, as well as better supervision of male patients, could be possible fall prevention strategies. Improvement of the quality of care and rehabilitation, with the focus on fall prevention based on these results, should be implemented in postoperative care of older people

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf