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  • 1.
    Jörgensen, Sophie
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine Research Group, Lund University.
    Martin Ginis, K.A.
    School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, Kelowna, BC.
    Lexell, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Leisure time physical activity among older adults with long-term spinal cord injury2017In: Spinal Cord, ISSN 1362-4393, E-ISSN 1476-5624, Vol. 55, no 9, p. 848-856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN:

    Cross-sectional.

    OBJECTIVES:

    To describe participation in leisure time physical activity (LTPA) (amount, intensity and type) among older adults with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI), and to investigate the associations with sociodemographics, injury characteristics and secondary health conditions (SHCs).

    SETTING:

    Home settings in southern Sweden.

    METHODS:

    Data from the Swedish Aging with Spinal Cord Injury Study (SASCIS). The physical activity recall assessment for people with SCI was used to assess LTPA among 84 men and 35 women (mean age 63.5 years, mean time since injury 24 years, injury levels C1-L5, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale A-D). Associations were analyzed statistically using hierarchical multivariable regression.

    RESULTS:

    Twenty-nine percent reported no LTPA, whereas 53% performed moderate-to-heavy intensity LTPA. The mean minutes per day of total LTPA was 34.7 (±41.5, median 15, range 0-171.7) and of moderate-to-heavy LTPA 22.5 (±35.1, median 5.0, range 0-140.0). The most frequently performed activities were walking and wheeling. Sociodemographics, injury characteristics and SHCs (bowel-related and bladder-related problems, spasticity and pain) explained 10.6% and 13.4%, respectively, of the variance in total and moderate-to-heavy LTPA. Age and wheelchair use were significantly, negatively associated with total LTPA. Women, wheelchair users and employed participants performed significantly less moderate-to-heavy LTPA than men, those using walking devices/no mobility device and unemployed participants.

    CONCLUSION:

    Many older adults with long-term SCI do not reach the amount or intensity of LTPA needed to achieve fitness benefits. Research is needed on how to increase LTPA and to identify modifiable factors that could enhance their participation.Spinal Cord advance

  • 2.
    Lundström, Ulrica
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Wahman, K.
    Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Seiger, Å.
    Division of Neurodegeneration, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Grey, DB
    Disability and Community Participation Research Office (DACPRO), Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO.
    Isaksson, Gunilla
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Lilja, Margareta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Participation in activities and secondary health complications among persons aging with traumatic spinal cord injury2017In: Spinal Cord, ISSN 1362-4393, E-ISSN 1476-5624, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 367-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN:

    Cross-sectional study.

    OBJECTIVES:

    To describe participation in activities and explore the relationship with secondary complications among persons aging with a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI).

    SETTING:

    A regional SCI outpatient center in Sweden.

    METHODS:

    Data were collected through a phone survey, which included 10 activities from the instrument PARTS/M-v3 (PARTicipation Survey/Mobility version-3) together with data from the participants' medical records. Cross-tabulation and χ2 were used for data analysis.

    RESULTS:

    In this study, 121 persons matched the inclusion criteria and the final study sample comprised 73 participants (60% response rate): 55 men and 18 women. Mean age was 63.7±9.4 years, and mean time since injury was 36.3±9.2 years. Regardless of duration of SCI, all 73 participated in dressing, bathing and leisure activities. Women reported better health than men. Particularly for those who lived 36-55 years after injury; increasing pain, fatigue, spasticity and decreased muscle strength were negatively affecting participation in activities, especially exercise and active recreation. Additionally, a need to save strength/energy was also a reason for not participating in the activities. Perceived future support and concerns in relation to personal assistance, assistive devices and rehabilitation was also reported.

    CONCLUSION:

    Increasing secondary health complications and a need to save strength/energy influenced participation in activities. Laws and/or governmental policies regarding personal assistance and assistive devices did not always support participation in activities. Interventions should aim to create a balance among activities in everyday life

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