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  • 1.
    Duan, Hongtao
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.
    Ma, Ronghua
    State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.
    Xu, Xiaofeng
    Ecosystem Dynamics and Global Ecology (EDGE) Laboratory, School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, Al, 36849, USA.
    Kong, Fanxiang
    State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.
    Zhang, Shouxuan
    State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.
    Kong, Weijuan
    Department of Geography Information Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China.
    Hao, Jingyan
    State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.
    Shang, Linlin
    State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.
    Two-Decade Reconstruction of Algal Blooms in China’s Lake Taihu2009In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 3522-3528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The algal blooming in the inland lakes has become a critically important issue for its impacts not only on local natural and social environments, but also on global human community. However, the occurrences of blooming on larger spatial scale and longer time scale have rarely been studied. As the third largest freshwater lake in China, Lake Taihu has drawn increasing attention from both public and scientific communities concerning its degradation. Using available satellite images, we reconstructed the spatial and temporal patterns of algal blooms in Lake Taihu through the past two decades. The blooming characteristics over the past two decades were examined with the dynamic of initial blooming date being highlighted. The initial blooming dates were gradually becoming later and later from 1987 to 1997. Since 1998, however, the initial blooming date came earlier and earlier year by year, with approximately 11.42 days advancement per year. From 1987 to 2007, the annual duration of algal blooms lengthened year by year, in line with the substantial increases in the occurrences of algal blooms in spring and summer months. The algal blooms usually occur in northern bays and spread to center and south parts of Lake Taihu. The increases in previous winter’s mean daily minimum temperature partially contributed to the earlier blooming onset. However, human activities, expressed as total gross domestic product (GDP) and population, outweighed the climatic contribution on the initial blooming date and blooming duration. This study may provide insights for the policy makers who try to curb the algal blooming and improve the water quality of inland freshwater lakes.

  • 2.
    Hao, Jingyan
    Planetary Sciences and Remote Sensing Group, Institute of Geological Sciences, Freie Universität Berlin, Malteserstr. 74-100, 12249, Berlin, Germany.
    Variability of spider spatial configuration at the Martian south pole2020In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 185, article id 104848Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Hao, Jingyan
    et al.
    Planetary Sciences and Remote Sensing, Institute of Geological Sciences, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Michael, Greg
    Planetary Sciences and Remote Sensing, Institute of Geological Sciences, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Adeli, Solmaz
    Institute of Planetary Research, Deutsche Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Berlin, Germany.
    Jaumann, Ralph
    Planetary Sciences and Remote Sensing, Institute of Geological Sciences, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Institute of Planetary Research, Deutsche Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Berlin, Germany.
    Araneiform terrain formation in Angustus Labyrinthus, Mars2019In: Icarus, ISSN 0019-1035, E-ISSN 1090-2643, Vol. 317, p. 479-490Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Li, Xiaowu
    et al.
    Computer and Information Engineering College, Guizhou Minzu University, Guiyang, PR China.
    Hao, Jingyan
    Computer and Information Engineering College, Guizhou Minzu University, Guiyang, PR China.
    Zhou, Jie
    Institute of Applied Mathematics, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, P.R. China.
    Ren, Dasen
    Computer and Information Engineering College, Guizhou Minzu University, Guiyang, PR China.
    On a Family of Trimodal Distributions2014In: Communications in Statistics - Theory and Methods, ISSN 0361-0926, E-ISSN 1532-415X, Vol. 43, no 14, p. 2886-2896Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, a family of trimodal distributions is presented. The distributional properties and some of the inferential aspects of this family of trimodal distributions are discussed. We propose a moment based estimator as well as a maximum likelihood estimator of the parameters. A numerical simulation is conducted to evaluate the finite sample performances of the proposed estimators. A real data example is analyzed for illustration.

  • 5.
    Li, Yichuan
    et al.
    China Aero Geophysical Survey and Remote Sensing Center for Natural Resources, Beijing, China.
    Yu, Junchuan
    China Aero Geophysical Survey and Remote Sensing Center for Natural Resources, Beijing, China.
    Yu, Xuezhong
    China Aero Geophysical Survey and Remote Sensing Center for Natural Resources, Beijing, China.
    Hao, Jiaojiao
    China Aero Geophysical Survey and Remote Sensing Center for Natural Resources, Beijing, China.
    Hao, Jingyan
    Institute of Geological Sciences, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Xu, Hongyan
    Geosciences Documentation Center of China Geological Survey, Beijing, China.
    Yang, Xue
    China Aero Geophysical Survey and Remote Sensing Center for Natural Resources, Beijing, China.
    Analysis of seismic controlling factors of the Danjiangkou reservoir based on remote sensing and aeromagnetic data2021In: Seventh Symposium on Novel Photoelectronic Detection Technology and Applications / [ed] Junhong Su, Junhao Chu, Qifeng Yu and Huilin Jiang, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2021, Vol. 11763, article id 117635PConference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Xiao, Haifeng
    et al.
    Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformation Science, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Stark, Alexander
    Institute of Planetary Research, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Berlin, Germany.
    Schmidt, Frédéric
    Université Paris-Saclay, CNRS, GEOPS, Orsay, France; Institut Universitaire de France (IUF), Paris, France.
    Hao, Jingyan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Division of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.
    Steinbrügge, Gregor
    Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Wagner, Nicholas L.
    Department of Geosciences, Baylor University, Waco, TX, USA.
    Su, Shu
    Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformation Science, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Cheng, Yuan
    College of Surveying and Geo-Informatics, Tongji University, Shanghai, China.
    Oberst, Jürgen
    Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformation Science, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Spatio-Temporal Level Variations of the Martian Seasonal North Polar Cap From Co-Registration of MOLA Profiles2022In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets, ISSN 2169-9097, E-ISSN 2169-9100, Vol. 127, no 10, article id e2021JE007158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The seasonal deposition and sublimation of CO2 constitute a major element in Martian volatile cycles. We reprocess the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data and apply co-registration procedures to obtain spatio-temporal variations in levels of the Seasonal North Polar Cap (SNPC). The maximum level over the Residual North Polar Cap (RNPC) is 1.3 m, approximately half of that at the south pole (2.5 m). However, the maximum level in the dune fields at Olympia Undae can be up to 3.8 m. Furthermore, off-season decreases up to 3 m during the northern winter at Olympia Undae are observed. These are likely due to metamorphism effects accentuated by the reduced snowfall at this period. Meanwhile, off-season increases of up to 2 m during the northern spring are noted, the cause of which remains to be explored. The volume of the SNPC peaks at the end of northern winter and is estimated to be approximately 9.6 × 1012 m3, which is 2% more than that of the Seasonal South Polar Cap. The bulk density of the SNPC can go through phased decreases in accordance with phased accumulation at northern high-latitudes. These findings can put important constraints on the Martian volatile cycling models.

  • 7.
    Xiao, Haifeng
    et al.
    Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformation Science, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Stark, Alexander
    Institute of Planetary Research German Aerospace Center (DLR), Berlin, Germany.
    Schmidt, Frédéric
    CNRS, GEOPS, Université Paris‐Saclay, Orsay, France; Institut Universitaire de France (IUF), Paris, France.
    Hao, Jingyan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Su, Shu
    Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformation Science, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Steinbrügge, Gregor
    Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford, USA.
    Oberst, Jürgen
    Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformation Science Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Spatio‐temporal level variations of the Martian Seasonal South Polar Cap from co‐registration of MOLA profiles2022In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets, ISSN 2169-9097, E-ISSN 2169-9100, Vol. 127, no 7, article id e2022JE007196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The seasonal deposition and sublimation of CO2 represents a major element in the Martian volatile cycle. Here, co-registration strategies are applied to Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) profiles to obtain spatio-temporal variations in snow/ice level of the Seasonal South Polar Cap (SSPC), in grid elements of 0.5° in latitude from 60°S to 87°S and 10° in longitude. The maximum snow/ice level in the range of 2 m to 2.5 m is observed over the Residual South Polar Cap. Peak level at the Residual South Polar Cap in Martian Year 25 (MY25) are found to be typically ∼0.5 m higher than those in MY24. The total volume is estimated to peak at approximately 9.4× 1012 m3. In addition, a map of average bulk density of the SSPC during its recession is derived. It implies much more snowfall-like precipitation at the Residual South Polar Cap and its surroundings than elsewhere on Mars.

1 - 7 of 7
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