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  • 1.
    Foorginezhad, S.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Zerafat, M. M.
    Faculty of Advanced Technologies, Nano-Chemical Engineering Department, Shiraz University, Shiraz, 71348-51154, Iran.
    Asadnia, M.
    School of Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, 2109, Australia.
    Rezvannasab, Gh
    Faculty of Advanced Technologies, Nano-Chemical Engineering Department, Shiraz University, Shiraz, 71348-51154, Iran.
    Activated porous carbon derived from sawdust for CO2 capture2024In: Materials Chemistry and Physics, ISSN 0254-0584, E-ISSN 1879-3312, Vol. 317, article id 129177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions, especially CO2, highlights the critical demand for efficient CO2 capture technologies. This is due to their essential role in climate change and their profound impact on global ecosystems and human well-being. Activated carbons have emerged as promising candidates for CO2 capture due to their availability, cost-effectiveness, and tunable properties. In this study, activated carbons were synthesized from sawdust carbonized at various temperatures within the 700–1100 °C range and subsequently activated using CO2. Comprehensive characterization was conducted through SEM, FESEM, XRD, TGA, and FTIR techniques to assess the properties. The results reveal that carbonization at 1000 °C yielded an activated carbon with a hierarchical and microporous structure, featuring surface area, pore volume, and pore size of 1651.34 m2/g, 0.69 cm³/g, and <1.76 nm, respectively. Remarkably, this activated carbon exhibited promising CO2 uptake of 9.2 mmol/g at 25 °C and 1 bar. Moreover, a remarkable recyclability over 10 cycles demonstrates its potential for practical CO2 capture applications. Furthermore, the synthesized activated carbon exhibited high selectivity for CO2 over N2 (85/15 v/v), reaching 40.2 at 1 bar and 25 °C. These findings underscore the viability of the as-prepared activated carbon as a desired candidate for efficient and selective CO2 capture, contributing to the ongoing efforts to mitigate the impact of anthropogenic CO2 emissions to the environment.

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  • 2.
    Foorginezhad, Sahar
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    CO2 Capture through Integration of Aqueous and Immobilized Deep Eutectic Solvents2024Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing global concern over rising CO2 emissions and its significant impact on climate change highlight the urgent need for efficient CO2 capture technologies. Among the array of techniques employed for this purpose, chemical absorption stands out, characterized by high capture capacity, promising efficiency, and versatile applicability. In this context, Ionic liquids (ILs) and their analogs, deep eutectic solvents (DES), have emerged as promising alternatives to conventional solvents due to their low vapor pressures, high thermal stability, and chemical tunability. However, they also face challenges of high viscosity and cost. Studies have identified two promising strategies to address these limitations: (i) using low-viscous solvents to mix with ILs/DESs and (ii) immobilizing ILs/DESs over a large surface (solid porous materials) to develop composites. The goal of this thesis was to integrate these two strategies to develop an innovative sorbent with enhanced CO2 capture capacity while improving kinetics. The main progress achieved in this thesis is as follows:

    In the first part, ILs/DESs were screened from the properties where a literature survey was combined with COSMO-RS for different IL/DES-based technologies. One DES was selected. To study the CO2 capture using immobilized ILs/DESs, porous adsorbents were evaluated based on a literature survey by considering the surface area, pore size/volume, stability, availability, and price. Mesoporous silica was selected as a suitable substrate for immobilization. 

    In the second part, a range of aqueous DESs was developed based on the molar ratio of DES components and water content for CO2 capture. Then, the CO2 capture capacity and viscosity of aqueous DESs (before and after absorption) were systematically evaluated and compared with a commercial absorbent. An optimal solution was then selected to achieve a balance between higher CO2 capture capacity and lower viscosity. Additionally, absorption kinetics, recyclability, and the effect of temperature on CO2 capture capacity were studied.

    In the third part, studies were directed towards the novel strategy, i.e., developing sorbent via integrating aqueous and immobilized DESs, i.e., slurry. To this end, DES was immobilized into mesoporous silica at different loadings and mixed with the aqueous DES. Their CO2 capture capacity was measured and the optimal slurry, selected based on CO2 capture performance, underwent further analysis to evaluate kinetics, recyclability, and temperature effect on performance and obtained results were compared with a commercial solvent. 

    The full text will be freely available from 2024-12-01 09:00
  • 3.
    Foorginezhad, Sahar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Asadnia, M.
    School of Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales 2109, Australia.
    Superhydrophobic Al2O3/MMT-PDMS Coated Fabric for Self-Cleaning and Oil–Water Separation Application2023In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 39, no 50, p. 18311-18326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study introduces a novel superhydrophobic coating applied to the fabric surface through spray coating of the Al2O3/MMT nanocomposite and PDMS polymer to enhance the surface roughness and reduce the surface tension, respectively. The as-prepared coating exhibits a remarkable superhydrophobic property with a water contact angle (WCA) of ∼174.6° and a water sliding angle (WSA) < 5°. Notably, the fabric demonstrates a self-cleaning property through removing dust and dirt via adhering to water droplets. Moreover, the insignificant loss of WCA (3.2 and 1%) after exposure to alkaline and acidic media for 10 days verifies the promising chemical stability of the coated layer, whereas WCA > 160° after 24 h of immersion in various organic solvents further indicates the layer resistance. Besides, the layer sustains WCA of 174.5, 172.5, and 168.45° after 1 month of air exposure, ultrasonic washing, and 50 cycles of home laundry. The mechanical resistance of the fabric was verified by maintaining a WCA of 158.73° after 200 abrasion cycles. Also, the layer exhibits thermal resistance with <4.1% of WCA loss in the temperature range of −10 to 180 °C. Additionally, the superhydrophobic coating excels in oil–water separation, achieving >99% separation efficiency for various oils. These exceptional properties position the fabric for diverse applications, including protective clothing, outdoor gear, medical textiles, and sportswear, emphasizing its versatility and novelty in the realm of superhydrophobic materials. 

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  • 4.
    Foorginezhad, Sahar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Ji, Xiaoyan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Developing slurry based on immobilized and aqueous [MEACl][EDA] for CO2 captureManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Foorginezhad, Sahar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Ji, Xiaoyan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Development of Monoethanolamine Chloride-Ethylene Diamine Deep Eutectic Solvent for Ffficient Carbon Dioxide Capture2024In: Separation and Purification Technology, ISSN 1383-5866, E-ISSN 1873-3794, Vol. 347, article id 127593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deep eutectic solvents (DES) emerge as a compelling class of ionic liquids, with distinct advantages over traditional solvents, particularly in the realm of CO2 capture. In the present study, [MEACl][EDA] is synthesized across various molar ratios (1:3 to 1:10) and combined with the results of Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) to identify DESs. The DESs are further characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and the properties and performance of the DESs with diverse water contents (30–60 wt%) are systematically studied for CO2 capture. The optimal aqueous solution is identified based on the CO2 uptake and viscosity, followed by the evaluation of the cyclic absorption experiments. Results demonstrate that 40 wt% of [MEACl][EDA] DES with (1:5) molar ratio exhibits higher CO2 uptake (22.09 wt%) and comparable viscosity (4.401 mPa·s before and 13.330 mPa·s after CO2 capture at 25 °C) compared to aqueous 40 wt% MEA (15.74 wt% CO2 capture capacity, viscosity of 3.318 mPa·s before and 8.413 mPa·s after CO2 capture), and its absorption rate is also more favorable than the aqueous MEA. Furthermore, recycling studies reveal ∼ 88 % regeneration of the aqueous DES solution at 100 °C.

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  • 6.
    Foorginezhad, Sahar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Rezvannasab, Gh.
    Faculty of Advanced Technologies, Nano-Chemical Engineering Department, Shiraz University, Shiraz, 71348-51154, Iran.
    Asadnia, M.
    School of Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, 2109, Australia.
    Natural clay membranes: A sustainable and affordable solution for treating dye solutions, coal mine washery waste, and aquaculture wastewater2023In: Journal of Water Process Engineering, E-ISSN 2214-7144, Vol. 54, article id 104012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we fabricated low-cost, sustainable inorganic membranes using a one-step dry compaction process that incorporates natural clay and edible glycerin, followed by sintering at low temperatures. Open porosity and permeability of the membranes were in the 33.6–45.2 % and 621.74–864.7 l/m2.h.bar range, respectively. Regarding molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) and mercury porosity of membranes with 33.6 % and 45.2 % porosity, the average pore size of the former was 10 nm, while it was increased up to 10–70 nm, 0.9–3 Όm, and   10 Όm for the latter. The membranes were subjected to filtration for dye solutions, coal mine washery waste, and aquaculture wastewater, resulting in remarkable removal efficiencies. Specifically, the membranes achieved removal rates of 99.8 % for direct blue 71, 92.44 % for disperse red 74, and 99.1 % for red 2G in dye solutions. Furthermore, they demonstrated removal efficiencies of 99.19 % for turbidity and 94.2 % for chemical oxygen demand (COD) in coal mine washery waste. The membranes removed 98.5 % of total suspended solids from the fish farm effluent. During extended periods of operation, the clay membrane exhibited remarkable stability and minimal leaching of metal ions. Superior properties, including low-cost, nontoxic, and accessible precursors, one-step uni-axial fabrication process without the need for lubricant and plasticizer, low sintering temperature compared to commercial ceramic membranes, promising long-term chemical stability in highly acidic and alkaline media, recyclability, and reproducibility, make the as-prepared membranes an affordable and sustainable solution for treating wastewater in various industries, including textile, mining, and aquaculture, thereby mitigating the environmental impact of these industries.

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  • 7.
    Foorginezhad, Sahar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Yu, Gangqiang
    Faculty of Environment and Life, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing, China.
    Ji, Xiaoyan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Reviewing and screening ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents for effective CO2 capture2022In: Frontiers in Chemistry, E-ISSN 2296-2646, Vol. 10, article id 951951Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CO2 capture is essential for both mitigating CO2 emissions and purifying/conditioning gases for fuel and chemical production. To further improve the process performance with low environmental impacts, different strategies have been proposed, where developing liquid green absorbent for capturing CO2 is one of the effective options. Ionic liquids (IL)/deep eutectic solvents (DES) have recently emerged as green absorbents with unique properties, especially DESs also benefit from facile synthesis, low toxicity, and high biodegradability. To promote their development, this work summarized the recent research progress on ILs/DESs developed for CO2 capture from the aspects of those physical- and chemical-based, and COSMO-RS was combined to predict the properties that are unavailable from published articles in order to evaluate their performance based on the key properties for different IL/DES-based technologies. Finally, top 10 ILs/DESs were listed based on the corresponding criteria. The shared information will provide insight into screening and further developing IL/DES-based technologies for CO2 capture.

  • 8.
    Foorginezhad, Sahar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. Faculty of Advanced Technologies, Nano-Chemical Engineering Department, Shiraz University, Shiraz, 71348-51154, Iran.
    Zerafat, Mohammad Mahdi
    Faculty of Advanced Technologies, Nano-Chemical Engineering Department, Shiraz University, Shiraz, 71348-51154, Iran.
    Mohammadi, Younes
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Asadnia, Mohsen
    School of Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, 2109, Australia.
    Fabrication of tubular ceramic membranes as low-cost adsorbent using natural clay for heavy metals removal2022In: Cleaner Engineering and Technology, ISSN 2666-7908, Vol. 10, article id 100550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to high toxicity and non-biodegradability, heavy metals pollution is between the major concerns of today's world. Among various techniques, membrane separation technology has taken precedence over other counterparts due to reduced separation units, low energy consumption, facile upscaling, and continuous separation. This study aims to fabricate ultrafiltration membranes made from abundant natural materials to reduce fabrication/operational costs, including precursors, sintering temperature, and filtration pressure. Moreover, SnO2/Montmorillonite nanocomposite is synthesized via the hydrothermal procedure and incorporated into the membrane matrix to decrease membrane fouling, enhance water flux, and improve heavy metals rejection rate. Results delineate 97.88–99.26%, 76.79–92.23%, and 24.97–64.74% of Cu (II), Zn (II), and Ni (II) removal from aqueous solutions in the 5–50 ppm range. An enhancement up to ∼40% is observed upon nanocomposite incorporation. Furthermore, ∼30% increase in Cu (II) removal is obtained for SnO2/MMT-incorporated membranes. Moreover, utilization of abundant natural minerals results in decreased fabrication/operational cost. Therefore, the obtained removal results and the estimated overall cost provide guidance for the large-scale utilization of low-cost membranes. As a result, the demand for heavy metals removal from wastewaters before their discharge to protect and govern the environment and implementation for agricultural purposes are fulfilled. 

  • 9.
    Rabiee, Navid
    et al.
    School of Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, 2109, Australia; Centre for Molecular Medicine and Innovative Therapeutics, Murdoch University, Perth, WA 6150, Australia; Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran P.O. Box 11155-9161, Iran.
    Sharma, Rajni
    School of Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, 2109, Australia.
    Foorginezhad, Sahar
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. School of Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, 2109, Australia.
    Jouyandeh, Maryam
    Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran.
    Asadnia, Mohsen
    School of Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, 2109, Australia.
    Rabiee, Mohammad
    Biomaterial Group, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.
    Akhavan, Omid
    Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran P.O. Box 11155-9161, Iran.
    Lima, Eder C.
    Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.
    Formela, Krzysztof
    Department of Polymer Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Gdansk University of Technology, G. Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk, Poland.
    Ashrafizadeh, Milad
    Department of General Surgery and Institute of Precision Diagnosis and Treatment of Digestive System Tumors, Carson International Cancer Center, Shenzhen University General Hospital, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China; Shanghai Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
    Fallah, Zari
    Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, P. O. Box 47416, 95447, Babolsar, Iran.
    Hassanpour, Mahnaz
    Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan, 45137-66731 Iran.
    Mohammadi, Abbas
    Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441, Iran.
    Saeb, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Polymer Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Gdansk University of Technology, G. Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk, Poland.
    Green and Sustainable Membranes: A review2023In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 231, article id 116133Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Membranes are ubiquitous tools for modern water treatment technology that critically eliminate hazardous materials such as organic, inorganic, heavy metals, and biomedical pollutants. Nowadays, nano-membranes are of particular interest for myriad applications such as water treatment, desalination, ion exchange, ion concentration control, and several kinds of biomedical applications. However, this state-of-the-art technology suffers from some drawbacks, e.g., toxicity and fouling of contaminants, which makes the synthesis of green and sustainable membranes indeed safety-threatening. Typically, sustainability, non-toxicity, performance optimization, and commercialization are concerns centered on manufacturing green synthesized membranes. Thus, critical issues related to toxicity, biosafety, and mechanistic aspects of green-synthesized nano-membranes have to be systematically and comprehensively reviewed and discussed. Herein we evaluate various aspects of green nano-membranes in terms of their synthesis, characterization, recycling, and commercialization aspects. Nanomaterials intended for nano-membrane development are classified in view of their chemistry/synthesis, advantages, and limitations. Indeed, attaining prominent adsorption capacity and selectivity in green-synthesized nano-membranes requires multi-objective optimization of a number of materials and manufacturing parameters. In addition, the efficacy and removal performance of green nano-membranes are analyzed theoretically and experimentally to provide researchers and manufacturers with a comprehensive image of green nano-membrane efficiency under real environmental conditions.

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