Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 142
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Anokhin, Sergey
    et al.
    Kent State University, Kent, OH.
    George, Nerine Mary
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Technological Advancement through Imitation by Industry Incumbents in Strategic Alliances2013In: Uddevalla Symposium 2013. Innovation, High-Growth Entrepreneurship and Regional Development: Revised papers presented at the 16th Uddevalla Symposium 13-15 June, 2013, Kansa City, MO, USA / [ed] Irene Bernhard, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2013, p. 87-104Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contrary to the conventional wisdom, this study demonstrates that technological laggards and not industry front-runners are most likely to experience high rates of technological advancement in strategic alliances. We further suggest that imitation and not innovation is the primary source of such advancement based on the fact that technological progress by laggards is most visible in industries that lack strong appropriability regimes. Finally, we present empirical evidence suggesting that lagging established corporations prefer to imitate from startups and not from fellow-incumbents. These results are derived from a careful analysis of a longitudinal sample of over 150 incumbents with varying degree of technological prowess who engage in partnerships with both startups and fellow-incumbents across a wide representation of industries. Our paper contributes to technological innovation, strategic alliance, entrepreneurship, and imitation literatures and provides non-trivial implications for startups.

  • 2.
    Azadegan, Arash
    et al.
    New Mexico State University.
    Patel, Pankaj
    Ball State University.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Operational slack and venture survival2013In: Production and operations management, ISSN 1059-1478, E-ISSN 1937-5956, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Slack can act as a double-edged sword. While it can buffer against environmental threats to help ensure business continuity, slack canalso be costly and reduce profitability. In this study, we focus on operational slack, the form related to the firm’s production processes. We investigate the role of operational slack on firm survival during its venture stage, when its survival is significantly challenged by environmental threats. Specifically, we explore how change in three types of environmental uncertainty, namely dynamism, complexity and lack of munificence affect the relationship between operational slack and venture survival. Results suggest that with increase inenvironmental uncertainty, operational slack lowers the likelihood of venture failure.

  • 3.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Sturm, Dennis
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Embracing entrepreneurial behavior in a research school2009In: Design has never been this cool: ICED 09, the 17th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 24 - 27 August 2009, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA ; proceedings volume / [ed] Magareta Norell Bergendahl; Martin Grimheden; Larry Leifer, Design Research Society, 2009, Vol. 1: Design processes, p. 245-256Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PIEp (Product Innovation Engineering programme) is a newly established research school in product development engineering with the aim to increase innovation capabilities in the Swedish industries and to promote entrepreneurial behavior. By following a bottom-up approach PIEp has been able to embrace and foster entrepreneurial behavior. As an outcome the young research school has been able to change preexisting mindsets and to encourage the PIEp PhD students to be more proactive, risk-taking and innovative. This paper presents the chain of events that have happened since the establishment of the PIEp research school. In an action research approach the authors additionally state their own perceptions. Providing rich, descriptive examples and explaining certain cases in detail it is outlined how the transformation of the initial idea has been pursued until today. The insights provided are made public for future research, comparison to other research schools, and to policy makers interested in founding new research schools.

  • 4.
    Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Johansson, Christian
    Assessment of team based innovation in a Product Service System development process2011In: Research into Design: Supporting Sustainable Product Development / [ed] Amaresh Chakrabarti, Bangalore, India: Research Publishing Services, 2011, p. 711-718Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is often measured based on how the product performs on the market. This makes it difficult to measure the performance of a team since the time to develop a product may take several years. In this paper we show the importance of creating a common ground and facilitation in a team, two aspects that is not easy measure, but should be assessed. We also discuss innovation on three interrelated organizational levels, the operational, which is the development team and in focus in this paper, the managerial and the strategic level. We found that companies need indicators to measure and/or assess performance on all three levels and thatmore research is needed to find the inter-links between the levels to prescribe measures and assessment points.

  • 5.
    Bradley, S.W
    et al.
    Baylor University.
    McMullen, J
    Patel, Pankaj
    Ball State University.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Searching wide or deep?: absorptive capacity, slack resources and the role of external search in small firm growth2011In: Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, ISSN 0740-7416, Vol. 31, no 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms often conduct external search for new opportunities, but not all search leads to growth. Integrating traditional explanations of search from behavioral theory with biological foraging models, we explain how absorptive capacity together with financial slack influence breadth or depth of search. Our findings from 291 small Swedish technology firms indicate that higher absorptive capacity increases search. Absorptive capacity had a stronger effect on breadth of search than for depth of search. We find that only depth of search leads to higher growth for small firms. Further, financial slack strengthened the absorptive capacity and search depth relationship of search relationship, but weakened the relationship between absorptive capacity and breadth of search. The findings are consistent with foraging models that account for resource availability.

  • 6.
    Cedergren, S.I.
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Elfving, S.W.
    Ericsson Global Services Research.
    Eriksson, J.
    Mälardalen University.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    A road map for future research on industrial product-service systems (IPS2): a systematic review2012In: The Philosopher's Stone for Sustainability: Proceedings of the 4th CIRP International Conference on Industrial Product-Service Systems, Tokyo, Japan, November 8th-9th, 2012, Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2012, p. 185-190Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an ongoing trend to expand traditional offerings of selling goods towards providing value through services to customers. In academia the term Industrial Product-Service Systems (IPS2) describes this phenomenon. Although many articles have been published on IPS2 a systematic review is lacking. This paper presents a systematic review of the IPS2 domain. Five themes characterizing IPS2 are revealed: delivery, processes, value creation networks, knowledge management, and business models. IPS2 is concluded to be both a young and distributed field of research, with a scope that needs to expand in terms of the themes covered and number of empirical studies

  • 7.
    Cedergren, S.I.
    et al.
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University.
    Elfving, S.W.
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University.
    Eriksson, J.
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Analysis of the industrial product-service systems (IPS2) literature: A systematic review2012In: IEEE 6th International Conference on Management of Innovation and Technology, ICMIT 2012: Bali 11-13 June 2012, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 2012, p. 733-740Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Successful industrial goods-delivering companies are always looking for ways to develop and grow their business. A strong present trend is to expand the traditionally tangible offering by integrating intangible offerings i.e. services. In academia the term industrial product-service systems (IPS2) are being used to describe this paradigm shift. However, a systematic review of the IPS2 literature is lacking. In this paper publications regarding IPS2 are systematically reviewed. The result of our review has been categorized under five themes that we found characterizes IPS2: delivery, processes, value creation networks, knowledge management, and business models. Based on our findings a discussion is made and future research directions are identified

  • 8.
    Cedergren, Stefan
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Success factors and performance measurements: a missing link in product development?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Performance measurements are important for managing operation and supply chain activities. The literature within performance measurement and success factors in innovation and product development is vast, but with little cross-fertilization. In industry there is a clear consensus among manager’s that their measurements are not covering what is important to be successful. One explanation for this, as argued for in this paper, might be that there is a weak connection between what is considered to be important (a success factor) and what is actually measured by the performance measurement system in product development. In this paper the findings from a survey among large manufacturing companies in Sweden is presented. The paper is concluded with an analysis and discussion regarding why success factors are not represented in the performance measurement system and recommendations for future research.

  • 9.
    Cenamor, Javier
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    School of Social Sciences, Södertörn University.
    Pesämaa, Ossi
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Addressing dual embeddedness: The roles of absorptive capacity and appropriabilitymechanisms in subsidiary performance2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how subsidiaries can manage dual embeddedness with both local partners and a multinational enterprise. Specifically, we examine the role of absorptive capacity and appropriability mechanisms on subsidiary performance. We analyse how absorptive capacity and appropriability enable subsidiaries to successfully address knowledge challenges related to internal and external networks. We conducted an empirical analysis on a sample of 165 subsidiaries. Our results suggest that absorptive capacity has a direct, positive effect on subsidiary performance, which is greater in emerging countries. The study also found an indirect effect of absorptive capacity on subsidiary performance, which is mediated through appropriability mechanisms. These findings extend the literature on international networks, dual embeddedness and absorptive capacity

  • 10.
    Cenamor, Javier
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Rönnberg Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Adopting a Platform Approach in Servitization: Leveraging the Value of Digitalization2017In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 192, p. 54-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how a platform approach facilitates the implementation of advanced service offerings in manufacturing firms. Understanding servitization through a platform approach is important because many manufacturing firms fail to manage the service paradox, that is, the challenge of simultaneously enriching the value proposition by adding services while maintaining cost levels. This study focuses on how adopting a platform approach leverages the value of digital and information technologies (e.g., smart and connected machines) for advanced service offerings. It is argued that a platform approach based on a modular architecture can enable manufacturers to pursue both customization and operational efficiency. Based on multiple case studies, the findings highlight the importance of information modules replacing product and service modules as the core modules for successful servitization. More specifically, the findings illustrates the journeys of manufacturing firms as they leverage value from information modules to facilitate the orchestrating role of back-end units and the builder role of front-end units.

  • 11.
    Cenamor, Javier
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Rönnberg Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Leveraging the Value of a Platform Approach for Servitization2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Cervantes, Michel
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Higher education in hydropower2006In: International Water Power and Dam Construction, ISSN 0306-400X, E-ISSN 1538-6414, Vol. 58, no 7, p. 25-27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Business Studies, School of Social Sciences, Södertörn University.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Department of Management, University of Vaasa.
    Social media engagement strategy: Investigation of marketing and R&D interfaces in manufacturing industry2017In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that effective marketing and R&D interface is pivotal in a company's new product development performance and future competitiveness. The increased popularity of social media promised to enhance interaction, collaboration, and networking between the two functions. However, there is limited knowledge regarding the key activities, infrastructure requirements, and potential benefits of social media in the marketing and R&D interface. This study aims to advance the current understanding of social media engagement strategies, which facilitates improved marketing and R&D interfaces and ultimately NPD performance for manufacturing companies. Based on a multiple-case study in two manufacturing companies, this study first presents the role of social media in facilitating improved marketing and R&D interface within a B2B context. Second, it presents the adoption process of the social media engagement strategy for an evolving marketing and R&D interface. The adoption process is divided into three phases, namely coordination, cooperation, and coproduction, to provide detailed insights regarding full-scale social media engagement. Taken together, the study provides novel insights into industrial marketing management literature by exemplifying the role of social media and proposing a systematic social engagement strategy for improved marketing and R&D interface in the manufacturing industry.

  • 14.
    Einola, Suvi
    et al.
    University of Vaasa, Department of Management,.
    Kohtamäki, Marko
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. University of Vaasa, Department of Management.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. University of Vaasa, Department of Management.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Hanken School of Economics.
    Retrospective relational sensemaking in R&D offshoring2017In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 63, p. 205-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To address the increasing relational challenges in international R&D collaboration, the present study develops a framework for understanding retrospective relational sensemaking in R&D offshore relationships. Using a comparative case study methodology, this study analyzes relational data from 56 interviews regarding four R&D offshore relationships between two large Swedish multinational companies and four R&D offshore partners. This study contributes to existing sensemaking theory by constructing a framework for retrospective relational sensemaking, including triggers and the phases of enactment, selection, and retention, to improve relational learning in R&D offshore relationships.

  • 15.
    Ekman, Jonas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Antti, Marta-Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Emami, Reza
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Kuhn, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Minami, Ichiro
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Gustafsson, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Zorzano Mier, Maria-Paz
    Milz, Mathias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Grahn, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Behar, Etienne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering.
    Wolf, Veronika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Dordlofva, Christo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Mendaza de Cal, Maria Teresa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Jamali, Maryam
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Roos, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Ottemark, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nieto, Chris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Soria Salinas, Álvaro Tomás
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Vázquez Martín, Sandra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nyberg, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Neikter, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Lindwall, Angelica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Fakhardji, Wissam
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Projekt: Rymdforskarskolan2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The Graduate School of Space Technology

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Per-Erik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Patel, Pankaj C.
    Villanova University, Villanova School of Business.
    Rönnberg Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Managing Interorganizational Innovation Projects: Mitigating the Negative Effects of Equivocality Through Knowledge Search Strategies2016In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 691-705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Equivocality, or divergent interpretations and understandings of tasks and knowledge, has negative effects on performance because it increases conflicts and creates communication and coordination challenges in inter-organizational innovation projects. However, equivocality may also stimulate team members to discuss beliefs and interpretations in ways that provide improved understanding of knowledge and tasks. We theorize that mitigation of negative effects of equivocality on project performance is conditional on explorative or exploitative knowledge search mode. Exploitative search (increasing search depth) allows for rapid learning based on the partners' existing knowledge, but it also limits a team's ability to interpret and combine diverse knowledge. Explorative search (increasing search breadth), on the other hand, allows for novel combinations of diverse knowledge and thereby alleviates the negative effect of equivocality on performance. Based on quantitative data from 251 respondents in 52 heavy-engineering innovation projects in four multinational corporations based in Sweden and from their 29 collaborating partner firms worldwide, we find that equivocality reduces project performance, but that joint explorative search mitigates the negative effect of equivocality on project performance. However, we do not find support for the moderation effect of exploitative search on the relationship between equivocality and project performance. Theoretical and managerial contributions as well as limitations and suggestions for future research are presented

  • 17.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Critical success factors in early new product development: a review and a conceptual model2018In: The International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, ISSN 1554-7191, E-ISSN 1555-1938, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 411-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on the front end in the New Product Development (NPD) literature is fragmented with respect to the identification and analysis of the factors that are critical to successful product development. The article has a two-fold purpose. First, it describes, analyses, and synthesizes those factors through a literature review of the research on the front end in NPD. Second, it conceptualizes a framework that features two types of success factors: foundational success factors (common to all the firm’s projects) and project-specific success factors (appropriate for the firm’s individual projects). The article makes recommendations for the management of this important phase of product development, discusses limitations of relevant previous research, and offers suggestions for future research. The article makes a theoretical contribution with its analysis and synthesis of the reasons for success in front-end activities and a practical contribution with its conceptual framework that can be used as an analytical tool by firms and their product managers.

  • 18.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Dasselaar, Manfred
    Ericsson SE.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    When product meets service: Digitalizing industrial innovation2015In: Ericsson Business Review, ISSN 1653-9486, no 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Framtidens Produktframtagning i Svenska Företag: Trender, Implikationer och Reflektioner2014Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Framtidens produktframtagningsprocess i svenska företag: Vilka trender påverkar mest och hur behöver företagen förändra sina utvecklingsprocesser?2013In: Management of Innovation and Technology, ISSN 2001-208X, no 3, p. 5-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Gama, Fabio
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Idea generation and open innovation in SMEs: When doesmarket‐based collaboration pay off most?2018In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) largely depend on proficient idea generation activities to improve their front-end innovation performance, yet the liabilities of newness and smallness often hamper SMEs’ ability to benefit from systematic idea generation. To compensate for these liabilities, many SMEs adopt an open innovation approach by collaborating with market-based partners such as customers and suppliers. This study investigates the relationship between SMEs’ systematic idea generation and front-end performance and investigates the moderating role of market-based partnership for SMEs. Drawing on a survey of 146 Swedish manufacturing SMEs, this study provides two key contributions. First, the systematic idea generation and front-end performance relationship in SMEs is non-linear. Accordingly, higher levels of front-end performance are achieved when idea generation activities are highly systematic. Second, the returns from higher levels of systematic idea generation are positively moderated by market-based partnerships. Thus, external cooperation with customers and suppliers pays off most toward front-end performance when SMEs have highly systematic idea generation processes. These results indicate a contingency perspective on the role of external partnerships. They also have implications for research into the front-end of innovation and open innovation in the context of SMEs.

  • 22.
    Gama, Fabio
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Idea generation in SMEs: when does market-based partnership pay off most?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Gama, Fabio
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Systematic Idea Generation and Organizational Capabilities for Front-End Innovation Performance in SMEs2017In: Innovation ManagementArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This study seeks to answer two key questions about the front-end innovation: when do idea generation activities involving internal and external partner’s payoff, and which organizational capabilities support idea generation activities for achieving high front-end performance?

  • 24.
    Gama, Fábio
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Luleå University of Technology.
    Parida, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Untangling capabilities for managing the front end of innovationIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the vital and often underemphasized front end of innovation. It aims to explore how firms utilize organizational capabilities to manage multiple sources of fuzziness (uncertainty, equivocality, and complexity). In so doing, we use the capability- and knowledge-based view to examine the use of firms’ capabilities to navigate the front end process from vague ideas towards corroborated product definition. In our qualitative case of seven manufacturing firms, we explore practices, methods, and routines for managing the front end. We explain that new product ideas can be classified according to different degrees of fuzziness, which implies that not all product ideas can or should be treated in the same way. In fact, certain capabilities are more important for managing the development of ideas at low (i.e. process management and idea refinement) and high (problem formulation and problem solution) levels of fuzziness. Ultimately, we suggest a theoretical framework that elucidates how firms use two distinct paths (i.e. tolerance-based or reduction-based) to transform early new product ideas into corroborated product definitions. In doing so, our results guide project members in matching the magnitude of knowledge problems with organizational capabilities and thereby increase front-end performance.

  • 25.
    George, Nerine Mary
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Anokhin, Sergey
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Dancing with the stars or preying on the weak?: arbitrage opportunity pursuit by industry incumbents2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    George, Nerine Mary
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Anokhin, Sergey
    Kent State University, Kent, OH.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Technological Advancement through Imitation by Industry Incumbents in Strategic Alliances2015In: Innovation and Entrepreneurship in the Global Economy: Knowledge, Technology and Internationalization / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Urban Gråsjö and Sofia Wixe, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 65-88Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contrary to the conventional wisdom, this study demonstrates that technological laggards and not industry front-runners are most likely to experience high rates of technological advancement in strategic alliances. We further suggest that imitation and not innovation is the primary source of such advancement based on the fact that technological progress by laggards is most visible in industries that lack strong appropriability regimes. Finally, we present empirical evidence suggesting that lagging established corporations prefer to imitate from startups and not from fellow-incumbents. These results are derived from a careful analysis of a longitudinal sample of over 150 incumbents with varying degree of technological prowess who engage in partnerships with both startups and fellow-incumbents across a wide representation of industries. Our paper contributes to technological innovation, strategic alliance, entrepreneurship, and imitation literatures and provides non-trivial implications for startups.

  • 27.
    George, Nerine Mary
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Lahti, Tom
    Department of Entrepreneurship, Management and Organization, Hanken School of Economics, Vasa.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    A Systematic Literature Review of Entrepreneurial Opportunity Recognition: Insights on Influencing Factors2016In: The International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, ISSN 1554-7191, E-ISSN 1555-1938, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 309-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last three decades, research studies investigating how individuals recognize entrepreneurial opportunities have advanced rapidly and have become a key topic in the modern entrepreneurship literature. To advance this important concern further, we present a systematic literature review of the entrepreneurial opportunity research field and its status. Contrary to conventional wisdom, this research suggests that the field is fragmented and empirically underdeveloped. A comprehensive literature analysis shows that only a handful of authors have contributed specifically to developing dialogues related to opportunity recognition and that the topic is considered primarily as an ancillary issue by many authors and academic journals. Based on analyzing 180 articles, we classify existing contributions into six influential factors: prior knowledge, social capital, cognition/personality traits, environmental conditions, alertness, and systematic search. Moreover, by developing a framework, we communicate critical insights regarding the opportunity recognition process. The contribution of individual articles to the proposed factors is presented in a research synthesis table. We conclude by presenting several directions for future research related to opportunity recognition.

  • 28.
    Graff, Jens
    et al.
    Umeå university.
    Sophonthummapharn, Kittipong
    Umeå university.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Cognitive dissonance in post purchase period: evidence from mobile phone users2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates whether the cognitive dissonance exists in post purchase phase in mobile phone industry. It is not certain that mobile phone users are fully satisfied since they are usually confused with abundant information during purchasing period. Three dissonant dimensions were measured with two-hundred-and-eighty-three university students. The results provide interesting insights. The major differences between high and low dissonance group are: ‘influence by other people’s opinion’, ‘difficulty in searching information’, ‘product involvement’, and ‘satisfaction with mobile phone/operator’. The findings reveal that consumers are ‘not unhappy’ with their mobile phone/operator, but not extremely happy either. There is ample room for improvements. For marketers, the consumer perceptions toward communication messages should be given high priority. The messages need to be straightforward and clear in the consumers’ interpretation.

  • 29.
    Graff, Jens
    et al.
    SolBridge International School of Business.
    Sophonthummapharn, Kittipong
    Rajamangala University of Technology, Suvarnabhumi.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Post-purchase cognitive dissonance: Evidence from the mobile phone market2012In: International Journal of Technology Marketing, ISSN 1741-878X, E-ISSN 1741-8798, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 32-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates whether cognitive dissonance exists in the post-purchase phase in the mobile phone industry. It asks if mobile phone users are fully satisfied since they are usually overloaded with information during the purchasing period. Three dimensions of dissonance were measured in 283 university students. The results provide interesting insights. The major differences between the high and low dissonance groups are being influenced by other people’s opinions, difficulty in finding information, product involvement, and satisfaction with mobile phones/operators. These findings reveal that consumers are ‘not unhappy’ with their mobile phones/operators, but not extremely happy either. However, there is ample room for improvements in the level of consumer satisfaction. Marketers should give consumers’ perceptions of communicated messages high priority. The messages need to be straightforward and clear in the consumers’ interpretation as this will reduce negative feelings after purchase.

  • 30.
    Johansson, Christian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    How are knowledge and information evaluated?: decision making in stage-gate processes2009In: Design has never been this cool: ICED 09, the 17th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 24 - 27 August 2009, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA ; proceedings volume / [ed] Margareta Norell Bergendahl; Martin Grimheden; Larry Leifer, Design Research Society, 2009, Vol. 1: Design processes, p. 195-206Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Stage-Gate processes decisions are made based on the knowledge and information developed during the preceding phase. The purpose of this study is to explore the current state-of-practice in industry regarding the assessment of knowledge and information at gate. The result indicates that gate reviews relates mainly to assessments of technical performance and function. Relatively little attention is given to assess the quality of the knowledge base, making it difficult to identify outdated, irrelevant and non-applicable information and knowledge. Further, tacit knowledge plays an important role in the decision making process, as reviewers ask for design rationale and further evidence of what has been done, and why. However, evaluating such knowledge is currently a poorly understood aspect of gate reviews. Conclusions drawn is that, although the specific focus of such meetings is not the evaluation of knowledge and information, there is a promising opportunity to work towards a better support of such activities, especially since the respondents perceive benefits coming from an increased attention to assessments of both the explicit and tacit knowledge base used in gate reviews.

  • 31.
    Kohtamäki, Marko
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Hakala, Henri
    University of Vaasa, Department of Management.
    Partanen, Jukka
    Aalto University, School of Business.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    The performance impact of industrial services and service orientation on manufacturing companies2015In: Managing Service Quality, ISSN 0960-4529, E-ISSN 1758-8030, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 463-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeProduct-manufacturing firms are increasingly positioning themselves as providers of industrial services and solutions. Despite the increasing conceptual interest in industrial services, empirical evidence about the factors that mediate the relationships between industrial services and firm performance remains limited. This paper investigates the relationship between industrial service offerings, service orientation and firm sales and profit performance.Design/methodology/approachThe study uses data from 115 manufacturing firms and adopts a structural equation modeling technique to test a set of hypotheses on service offerings, service orientation and company sales and profit performance.FindingsThe results underline the importance of implementing service orientation in employees’ behavior, recruitment, training and assessment. Service orientation is demonstrated as an essential mediator for the relationship between service offerings, revenues and profits. The results therefore suggest that both service offerings and service orientation are important when manufacturing companies attempt to position themselves as industrial service providers. Research limitations/implicationsGiven the limitations of the sample collected from the Finnish manufacturing industry, future studies could refine the measures and investigate the applicability of the results in other contexts. Practical implicationsThe results suggest that developing a service orientation is vital for manufacturing companies to profit from increased offerings of industrial services. Because nurturing service orientation is a central enabler of the impact of service offerings on sales and profit performance, it is in the interests of manufacturing firms moving towards a servitized business model to develop training, compensation, and recruitment policies.Originality/valueThe study establishes a link between service offerings, service orientation, sales and profit performance in manufacturing firms. This is among the first studies to provide statistical evidence to support claims that even manufacturing firms can benefit from developing integrated product-service solutions.

  • 32.
    Kohtamäki, Marko
    et al.
    University of Vaasa.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Partanen, Jukka
    Aalto University School of Economics (CKIR).
    The mediating-moderating role of network capability in service strategy: sales performance link2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corresponding to calls for studies to test important links between industrial service offerings and company sales performance, this study tests the role of two mediating constructs, service performance and network capability for traditional manufacturing companies that have started to add services to their product offerings. Moreover, this study tests the moderating role of network capability on the service offering – service performance as well as service offering – company sales performance links to highlight the interaction between implementation of industrial service strategy and service structure. We reasoned that these moderators would be important especially in times of economic downturn, whereby we collected data of how traditional manufacturing companies succeeded with implementation of extensive service strategies during the significant economic downturn the last couple of years. Through application of structural modeling and generalizable data of 115 Finnish product manufacturing companies, the findings confirm the hypothesized mediating role of service performance in the service strategy – company sales performance relationship for product manufacturers migrating from product manufacturing towards service business, and implementing service strategy suggesting that services can actually provide counter-cyclical, resistant and more stable source of revenues than products. In addition, the results confirm that implementation of service strategy facilitates the development of important network capabilities, which then further increase company sales performance. Most importantly, the results highlight the interaction between service strategy and network capability suggesting that network capability enables value creation from service offerings, as network capability moderates the service offering – service performance as well as service offering – company sales performance linkages. For manufacturing managers thinking of adding services to their operations, the results suggest that active development of service offerings in interaction with customers is important to effectively implement service strategy and to develop the necessary network capabilities needed to secure improvements in company sales performance for such a change of business operations.

  • 33.
    Kohtamäki, Marko
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Partanen, Jukka
    Aalto University.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Non-linear relationship between industrial service offering and sales growth: The moderating role of network capabilities2013In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 1374-1385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an effort to approach the mixed findings regarding the relationship between a firm’s industrial service offering and its performance, this study analyzes the impact of the industrial service offering on sales growth and the moderating role of network capabilities. The proposed research model is tested based on data from 91 Finnish manufacturing firms. Our results demonstrate a non-linear effect of the service offering on sales growth. We also find that network capabilities enhance the effect of the service offering on sales growth. For managers of manufacturing firms, the results imply that the active development of a comprehensive service offering should be implemented in conjunction with the development of organizational capabilities, such as network capabilities, to create value and promote improved performance.

  • 34. Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, External, LTU Business AB.
    Johansson, Christian
    Johansson, Pär
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wenngren, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Ylinenpää, Håkan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Project: PIEp - Product Innovation Engineering Programme2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    PROJEKTSAMMANFATTNINGPIEp, Product Innovation Engineering Program är ett nationellt program som syftar till att stärka förmågan till innovativ produkt- och affärsutveckling. PIEp spänner över fältet från teori till praktik, från forskning om innovationssystem till proaktivt arbete för att stärka innovationskraft och därigenom uppnå en systemförändring inom forskning, utbildning och utveckling. PIEp skall pågå under tio år, 2007-2016 och engagera flera av Sveriges lärosäten och forskningsinstitut involverade i innovation och produktutveckling. PIEp leds och administreras vid KTH i partnerskap med Lunds Tekniska Högskola, Högskolan i Jönköping, Designhögskolan vid Umeå Universitet, Centrum för Teknik, Medicin och Hälsa, Luleå Tekniska Universitet, samt en rad företag och organisationer.

  • 35.
    Lenka, Sambit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Development of integrated product/service offers through integration, or not?: A multiple case study of global manufacturing firms2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a world where advanced engineering products are commoditized, many manufacturing companies now strive to improve differentiation and profitability by offering integrated combinations of products and services known as product-service systems (PSS). Prior literature has proposed that such integrated offers be developed through an integrated product/service development process, but has so far not studied such integration in detail. To this background, our purpose is to study how integrated product/service offers actually come about. Our results are somewhat surprising, and paradoxical. Through an inductive multiple case study across eight multinational companies, we find that effective alignment-not integration-is the key to developing successful integrated PSS offerings. Thus, an integrated PSS offer seems to be reached through alignment rater than integration. The paper also identifies the key factors that inhibit integration and the various mechanisms that support alignment, and provides theoretical implications for literature and managerial implications for better development of integrated PSS solutions.

  • 36.
    Lenka, Sambit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Rönnberg Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Digitalization and advanced service innovation: How digitalization capabilities enable companies to co-create value with customers2016In: Management of Innovation and Technology, no 3, p. 3-5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Lenka, Sambit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. University of Vaasa, Department of Management.
    Rönnberg Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki.
    Exploring the microfoundations of servitization: How individual actions overcome organizational resistance2018In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, p. 328-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Servitization research has principally focused on the transition of organizational-level strategy, systems, capabilities, and processes for firms to be able to offer advanced services to their customers. Less is known of the underlying microfoundational dynamics of such transitions at the individual-level. Based on a multiple case study of six large multinational industrial firms engaged in servitization efforts, this paper identifies the tactics (i.e., evangelizing, bootlegging, leveraging, and collaborating) that individuals adopt to overcome organizational resistance to servitization. This study also presents the conditions that are necessary for individual employees to adopt these tactics. The present study provides theoretical and practical implications of the microfoundations of servitization, focusing attention on individual-level actions that affect the outcomes at the organizational-level to drive servitization efforts.

  • 38.
    Lenka, Sambit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Department of Management, University of Vaasa.
    Rönnberg Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Hanken School of Economics.
    Towards a multi-level servitization framework: Conceptualizing ambivalence in manufacturing firms2018In: International Journal of Operations & Production Management, ISSN 0144-3577, E-ISSN 1758-6593, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 810-827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The dominant-view within servitization literature presupposes a progressive transition from product to service orientation. In reality, however, many manufacturing firms maintain both product and service orientations throughout their servitization journey. Using the theoretical lens of organizational ambivalence, the purpose of this paper is to explore the triggers, manifestation and consequences of these conflicting orientations.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A multiple case study method was used to analyze five large manufacturing firms that were engaged in servitization. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 35 respondents across different functions within these firms.

    Findings

    Servitizing firms experience organizational ambivalence during servitization because of co-existing product and service orientations. This paper provides a framework that identifies the triggers of this ambivalence, its multi-level manifestation and its consequences. These provide implications for explaining why firms struggle to implement servitization strategies due to co-existing product and services orientations. Understanding organizational ambivalence, provides opportunity to manage related challenges and can be vital to successful servitization.

    Originality/value

    Considering the theoretical concept of ambivalence could advance the understanding of the effects and implications of conflicting orientations during servitization in manufacturing firms.

  • 39.
    Lenka, Sambit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Sjödin, David Rönnberg
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Eriksson, Joakim
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Role Conflict in R&D Units Ungergoing PSS Transition2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent trends in manufacturing industries, is the movement of firms towards providing industrial services or product-service systems (PSS). Importance of this phenomenon has been acknowledged as imperative for strategic differentiation, maintaining competitiveness, increase profitability and be environmentally sustainable. Although a lot of studies have focussed on the benefits of PSS provision, yet very less is know about the challenges of such transition, especially at the functional unit level within an organsiation. Our study focusses on the R&D unit and the various role conflicts that emerges as the function of the unit moves from being based on legal structure to that based on collegial authotiry in the PSS transtion process. In a cross-case analysis of large manufacturing comapanies involved in PSS transition, we identified how role conflicts occur at the organisation, unit and intra-unit levels. Our findings contribute to role conflcit literature and in the context of PSS and R&D units. We also observe that role conflict operates not just at the individual member level but at various levels within the orgasniation and the R&D unit, which has not been observed previously. We contribute by showing that an understanding of these challenges can be the differentiating factor for successful implementation and managing transtition towards PSS that have been previously negelected in PSS and R&D literature as well.

  • 40.
    Lenka, Sambit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Sjödin, David Rönnberg
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Eriksson, Joakim
    Volvo Construction Equipment.
    Role conflicts in R&D units undergoing pss transition2016In: IAMOT 2015: 24th International Association for Management of Technology Conference: Technology, Innovation and Management for Sustainable Growth, Proceedings / [ed] G.A. Thopil; L. Pretorius, Pretoria: Graduate School of Technology Management, University of Pretoria , 2016, p. 579-590Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent trends in manufacturing industries, is the movement of firms towards providing industrial services or product-service systems (PSS). Importance of this phenomenon has been acknowledged as imperative for strategic differentiation, maintaining competitiveness, increase profitability and be environmentally sustainable. Although a lot of studies have focussed on the benefits of PSS provision, yet very less is know about the challenges of such transition, especially at the functional unit level within an organsiation. Our study focusses on the R&D unit and the various role conflicts that emerges as the function of the unit moves from being based on legal structure to that based on collegial authotiry in the PSS transition process. In a cross-case analysis of large manufacturing companies involved in PSS transition, we identified how role conflicts occur at the organisation, unit and intra-unit levels. Our findings contribute to role conflict literature and in the context of PSS and R&D units. We also observe that role conflict operates not just at the individual member level but at various levels within the organisation and the R&D unit, which has not been observed previously. We contribute by showing that an understanding of these challenges can be the differentiating factor for successful implementation and managing transition towards PSS that have been previously neglected in PSS and R&D literature as well.

  • 41.
    Lenka, Sambit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Digitalization Capabilities as Enablers of Value Co-Creation in Servitizing Firms2017In: Psychology & Marketing, ISSN 0742-6046, E-ISSN 1520-6793, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 92-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As manufacturing companies pursue a servitization strategy, they are increasingly relying on developing digitalization capabilities to interact and co-create value with their customers. However, many lack an understanding of what constitutes digitalization capabilities and how they can create value with customers. To address these questions, the study builds on qualitative data from four industrial manufacturing firms to conceptualize three underlying subcomponents of digitalization capabilities, namely, intelligence capability, connect capability, and analytic capability. The study identifies and explains how digitalization capabilities enable value co-creation with customers through perceptive and responsive mechanisms. This study contributes to the servitization literature by showcasing how digitalization capabilities are enabling value co-creation in a business-to-business context.

  • 42.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Business Studies, School of Social SciencesSödertörn University, Huddinge; School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University, Växjo.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Department of Management University of Vaasa, Vaasa, Finland.
    Value logics for service innovation: practice-driven implications for service-dominant logic2018In: Service Business: An International Journal, ISSN 1862-8516, E-ISSN 1862-8508, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 457-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service-dominant logic (SDL) provides a conceptual understanding of and widens the view on value creation in service innovation for product-centric companies. However, empirical research linking SDL and service innovation is still limited albeit expanding. This study provides insights beyond existing discussions on product and service dimensions using the theoretical lens of the value logic perspective. More specifically, the purpose of this study is to examine how value can be understood, targeted, and created in the pursuit of service innovation by product-centric manufacturing companies. Building on a previous investigation of two multinational product-centric manufacturing companies, this paper identifies and develops a theoretical model to describe the space shift in service innovation with four different kinds of value logics, namely, product-based value logic, service-based value logic, virtual-based value logic, and systemic-based value logic. Using a digitalization-driven new service innovation, namely the My Control System, which is a web-based service delivery platform, this paper describes space shifts to enhance value through four value logics as efforts. Further, challenges associated with different value logics are described in terms of complexity traps and service gaps. The study also contributes to bridging the gap between SDL theory and practice by developing a midrange theoretical model for value creation as a specification and amendment to SDL that supports SDL-guided service innovation and servitization in practice.

  • 43.
    Lindström, John
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, ProcessIT Innovations R&D Centre.
    Kyösti, Petter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, ProcessIT Innovations R&D Centre.
    Delsing, Jerker
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Ventä, Olli (Contributor)
    Savolainen, Jouni (Contributor)
    Kangas, Petteri (Contributor)
    Helaakoski, Heli (Contributor)
    Virkkunen, Riikka (Contributor)
    Muhos, Matti (Contributor)
    Taipale-Erävala, Kyllikki (Contributor)
    Parida, Vinit (Contributor)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Sjödin, David (Contributor)
    Luleå University of Technology, Centre for Management of Innovation and Technology in Process Industry, Promote. Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    European roadmap for industrial process automation2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is an updated version of the ProcessIT. EU roadmap for industrial process automation, which was initially released in 2013 to provide guidance and input for process industry companies, providers of process industrial IT- and automation solutions, researchers as well as policy makers and bodies/initiatives that craft calls for RDI-projects. The main objective is for European process industry to stay competitive, profitable and sustainable. Thus, to support European process industry in its industrial process automation endeavours, the ProcessIT. EU roadmap outlines three top-level needs: sustainable production, competence management and trust, security, safety and privacy. These three top-level needs intersect the following ten R&D areas:

    • Productivity, efficiency, scalability and flexibility

    • Sustainability through circular economy - circular economy through industrial internet

    • Distributed production/modular factories and services

    • Artificial Intelligence and Big Data

    • Autonomous plants and remote operations

    • Platform economy

    • Cybersecurity

    • Safety - human, machine and environment

    • Competences and quality of work

    • Human-Machine Interfaces and Machine- to-Machine communications,

    which in turn are used as building blocks in the nine gamechangers . The gamechangers aim to influence the process industries’ competitiveness, profitability and sustainability . The gamechangers are listed below:

    • Modular factory for distributed and automated production

    • Live virtual twins of raw-materials, process and products

    • Increased information transparency between field and ERP

    • Real-time data analytics

    • Dynamic control and optimisation of output tolerances

    • Process industry as an integrated and agile part of the energy system

    • Management of critical knowledge

    • Semi-autonomous automation engineering

    • Integrated operational and cybersecurity management

    Finally, the ProcessIT. EU roadmap provides an insight into what may need to be considered on strategic and tactical levels, in terms of: objec-tives, R&D areas, game changers and business modelling, to keep and develop the competitive edge and initiative.

  • 44.
    Lindström, John
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Nilsson, Kent
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Sjödin, David Rönnberg
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ylinenpää, Håkan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Sustainable management of operation for Functional Products:: Which customer values are of interest for marketing and sales?2015In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 30, p. 299-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper addresses which customer values, related to sustainable management of operation for Functional Products, are of interest during manufacturing companies’ marketing and sales processes. Based on an empirical study covering five manufacturing companies, a set of customer values, which are categorized using Hill's [28] framework in order to understand whether they are important and why,is proposed. The analysis has generated a set of twenty-three potential values, whereof nine are considered as specific for contexts embodying Functional Products.Thus, the findings identify critical values to considerprior to, andwhen, selling Functional Products. Further, the results have important implications for the design and development of Functional Products in light of ongoing transformations within the manufacturing industry

  • 45.
    Lindström, John
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Plankina, Daria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Nilsson, Kent
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ylinenpää, Håkan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Karlsson, Lennart
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Functional Products: business model elements2013In: Product-Service Integration for Sustainable Solutions: Proceedings of the 5th CIRP International Conference on Industrial Product-Service Systems, Bochum, Germany, March 14th - 15th, 2013 / [ed] Horst Meier, Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2013, p. 251-262Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö.
    Hultman, Magnus
    University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom.
    Mostaghel, Rana
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Antecedents of technology-based self-service acceptance: a proposed model2012In: Services Marketing Quarterly, ISSN 1533-2969, E-ISSN 1533-2977, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 195-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology based self-service (TBSS) facilities have been widely implemented in the service industry and it is therefore vital to understand how customers arrive at decisions to adopt it. This paper presents and tests a model assessing the antecedents of customers’ acceptance of technology based self-service by merging the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) with self-service attributes. The findings show that intention to use TBSS is an ultimate function of customers’ perceived usefulness of the self service technology, their attitude towards using it, and their perceived enjoyment of using it. Managers who wish to employ TBSS should therefore first obtain a good understanding of the factors that drives their customers’ attitude towards the-self service. They should investigate how to make the self-service more enjoyable in addition to focusing on the traditional usability- and usefulness enhancing features. Recommendations for future research are also provided.

  • 47. Oghazi, Pejvak
    et al.
    Mostaghel, Rana
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Adoption of radio frequency identification among manufacturing firms2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of this paperPractitioners and academics have identified and acknowledged presence of gap related to actual and potential values of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in manufacturing industry. The purpose of this study is to present the RFID implementation in Swedish manufacturing firms and to what extend this technology is utilized throughout the supply chains of manufacturing companies.Design/methodology/approachIn this paper, we present a survey of RFID implementation in Swedish manufacturing firms, concerned with RFID system penetration. Large set of data from a large number of respondents in order to attain external validity and generalizable results. Empirical measures of a distribution’s shape characteristics (skewness and kurtosis) were used to assess the normality of the metric variables. The analyses are focused on to scrutinize the RFID impact on firms’ productivity and cost reduction in their supply chains.FindingsLevel of RFID implementation among Swedish manufacturing firms, and awareness of impact of this technology in the manufacturing industry.Research limitations/implicationsThe findings of this study can lay foundation of conduct for further empirical studies of impacts of RFID on manufacturing firms and their supply chains.Practical implicationsManagers are faced with a dilemma regarding adoption of RFID systems, since the decision may lead their firms either to outperform their competitors or waste valuable resources.Originality/valueAwareness of impact of RFID technology in manufacturing firms Supply chains. A distinctive insight in Swedish manufacturing implementation of this technology; which, comprehensives existing knowledge in the area.

  • 48. Oghazi, Pejvak
    et al.
    Mostaghel, Rana
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Prioritization of service quality factors in e-purchasing: a cross cultural study2012In: Advances in Management, ISSN 0974-2611, E-ISSN 2278-4551, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 44-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumer behaviour has changed dramatically in the past decade. Today, consumers can order online many customised products ranging from trainers to cars. In an increasingly interdependent world where barriers to trade and to international exchanges constantly diminish, cultural differences remain the single most enduring feature that has to be taken into account for localizing marketing strategies. One of the key challenges of online businesses is the management of service quality, which holds a significant importance to customer satisfaction. This paper is purposed to unveil customers’ perceptions on service quality priority and different cultures’ expectations in online shopping. The proposed study has been tested on data from 413 customers divided in two groups from Europe (n=215) and Middle East (n=198). The study is based on the SERVQUAL instrument that identifies five quality dimensions. The findings indicate that developing countries customers need more security and clarity in transactions but also better internet infrastructure. Based on the study results, recommendations for managers and future research are also provided

  • 49. Oghazi, Pejvak
    et al.
    Mostaghel, Rana
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    To be or not to be self-emloyed?: an empirical investigation2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Achieving competitiveness through externally oriented capabilities: an empirical study of technology-based small firms2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Small firms are regarded as the growth engine of the European economy. They are a major source of employment, entrepreneurial spirit, and innovation. However, many small firms also fail or struggle to survive. A common reason is a lack of internal resources which reduces the ability of small firms to meet increasing competition and market fluctuations. Based on a resource-based view (RBV), this study pursues an argument that small firms with externally oriented capabilities can achieve competitiveness through gaining access to external resources. In particular, this study focuses on two distinct externally oriented capabilities; network capability which represents a firm's ability to utilize inter-firm collaboration for accessing external resources, competences and knowledge; and information and communication technology (ICT) capability denoting a firm's ability to strategically use ICT functions or applications for communication and collaboration. This study also highlights that the relationship between firm capabilities and competitiveness is complex and there is a need to consider two important components which may influence this relationship. First, the mediating role of entrepreneurial strategy is investigated as it can provide an explanation for how capabilities are transformed into competitiveness. Second, the moderating role of network structure is examined as it relates to the context necessities related to the proposed relationship. Thus, the purpose of this study is to develop and test a model to assess how externally oriented capabilities influence the competitiveness of small firms. This study includes qualitative data from three technology-based small firms and quantitative data from 291 technology-based small firms in Sweden. The results can be summarized in five points. First, network capability and ICT capability are two important externally oriented capabilities, which allow small firms to gain from external collaborations and reach competitiveness. Second, network capability and ICT capability have different roles for small firm competitiveness. Network capability holds a strategic value that can directly lead to competitive advantage, while ICT capability is necessary for small firms to avoid competitive disadvantage. Third, both capabilities facilitate the deployment of an entrepreneurial strategy through developing the small firm's potential to identify and exploit opportunities. Fourth, entrepreneurial strategy has a strong influence on firm performance, as it allows small firms to leverage its externally oriented capabilities. Finally, network structure influences the relation of capabilities on competitiveness indicating that small firms need to work with its externally oriented capabilities differently based on their situation. The study's results hold several implications for small firm management and for policymaking which is discussed at length in the final section.

123 1 - 50 of 142
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf