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  • 1.
    Alharmoodi, Ahmed Abdulla
    et al.
    College of Business, Abu Dhabi University, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
    Khan, Mehmood
    College of Business, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates.
    Mertzanis, Charilaos
    College of Business, Abu Dhabi University, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
    Gupta, Shivam
    Department of Information Systems, Supply Chain Management & Decision Support, NEOMA Business School, Reims, France.
    Mikalef, Patrick
    Department of Computer Science, Faculty of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; Department of Technology Management, SINTEF Digital, Trondheim, Norway; School of Economics and Business, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Department of Management, University of Vaasa, Vaasa, Finland.
    Co-creation and critical factors for the development of an efficient public e-tourism system2024In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 174, article id 114519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study identifies the factors that guide the adoption of a public e-tourism system resulting in value co-creation in the UAE. Integrating and comparing factors drawn from the third version of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM3), the Technology-Task-Fit (TTF) theory, and push-to-use, an Analytic Hierarch Process (AHP) model was implemented with data collected using a structured questionnaire from purposively selected UAE e-tourism experts (N = 15) and analyzed using Microsoft Excel. The findings revealed that usefulness, convenience of use, and push-to-use were the most critical aspects for achieving an efficient public e-tourism system that allows for value co-creation in that order of ranking. The findings also suggest that computer self-efficiency is the most critical factor in effectively establishing an e-tourism system followed by government push-to-use. In conclusion, the findings demonstrate that usefulness and ease-of-use backed by computer self-efficiency, result demonstrability, and output quality are vital for the efficient adoption of a public e-tourism system resulting in value co-creation in the UAE.

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  • 2.
    Annarelli, Alessandro
    et al.
    Department of Computer, Control and Management Engineering, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
    Battistella, Cinzia
    Polytechnic Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Udine, Udine, Italy.
    Nonino, Fabio
    Department of Computer, Control and Management Engineering, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, School of Management/University of South-Eastern Norway, USN Business School, Vaasa, Finland.
    Pessot, Elena
    Polytechnic Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Udine, Udine, Italy. National Research Council of Italy - Institute of Intelligent Industrial Technologies and Systems for Advanced Manufacturing (CNR-STIIMA), Milan, Italy.
    Literature review on digitalization capabilities: Co-citation analysis of antecedents, conceptualization and consequences2021In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 166, article id 120635Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent decades have witnessed increased number of studies focusing on digitalization and related capabilities. Across disciplines digitalization capability is viewed as a sources of sustained competiveness. Nonetheless, several issues related to conceptualizing digitalization capabilities remain ambivalent. The present study, uses co-citation analysis to clarify concept of digitalization capability and identify three underlining capabilities, namely digital integration capabilities, digital platform capabilities, and digital innovation capabilities, that represents micro-foundation of digitalization capabilities. Further, a capability-based model is developed which includes antecedents and consequences of digitalization capabilities in an integrated conceptual model. Suggestions for future research, theoretical contributions and managerial contributions are also presented.

  • 3.
    Anokhin, Sergey
    et al.
    St. Cloud State University, St Cloud, MN, USA; National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Chistyakova, Natalia
    National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Antonova, Irina
    National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Spitsina, Lyubov
    National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; University of St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. f University of Vaasa, School of Management, Vaasa, Finland.
    Flagship enterprises, entrepreneurial clusters, and business entry rates: insights from the knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship2021In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 33, no 3-4, p. 353-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Employing a panel setting of 88 counties in the State of Ohio over the five-year period ending in 2006, this study aims to investigate the applicability of the knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship in explaining the relationships between flagship enterprises, entrepreneurial clusters, and business entry rates. The study confirms the overall positive relationship between flagship enterprises and startup rates, and the negative relationship between entrepreneurial clusters and startup rates. It further demonstrates that the effect of clusters is moderated by local unemployment rates so that higher rates of unemployment weaken the negative impact of entrepreneurial clusters on startup rates. Based on the evidence collected, policy makers should increase support for flagship enterprises in their regions, and would-be business owners should consider locating their ventures in proximity to flagship companies.

  • 4.
    Anokhin, Sergey
    et al.
    Kent State University, Kent, OH.
    George, Nerine Mary
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Technological Advancement through Imitation by Industry Incumbents in Strategic Alliances2013In: Uddevalla Symposium 2013. Innovation, High-Growth Entrepreneurship and Regional Development: Revised papers presented at the 16th Uddevalla Symposium 13-15 June, 2013, Kansa City, MO, USA / [ed] Irene Bernhard, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2013, p. 87-104Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contrary to the conventional wisdom, this study demonstrates that technological laggards and not industry front-runners are most likely to experience high rates of technological advancement in strategic alliances. We further suggest that imitation and not innovation is the primary source of such advancement based on the fact that technological progress by laggards is most visible in industries that lack strong appropriability regimes. Finally, we present empirical evidence suggesting that lagging established corporations prefer to imitate from startups and not from fellow-incumbents. These results are derived from a careful analysis of a longitudinal sample of over 150 incumbents with varying degree of technological prowess who engage in partnerships with both startups and fellow-incumbents across a wide representation of industries. Our paper contributes to technological innovation, strategic alliance, entrepreneurship, and imitation literatures and provides non-trivial implications for startups.

  • 5.
    Anokhin, Sergey
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Department of Management and Entrepreneurship, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, United States;Department of Management, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russian Federation.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland;University of St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Södertörn university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chistyakova, Natalia
    Department of Management, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russian Federation.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Södertörn university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Industrial clusters, flagship enterprises and regional innovation2019In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 31, no 1-2, p. 104-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For a sample of all 88 counties in the State of Ohio over a 5-year period, this study documents the effect of flagship enterprises and concentrated industrial clusters on regional innovation. Consistent with the agglomeration arguments and the knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship, both appear to affect regional innovation positively. Additionally, regional educational attainment positively moderates the effect of industrial clusters on innovation. At the same time, flagship enterprises primarily affect regional innovation in regions with low education levels. Results are obtained with the help of conservative econometric techniques and are robust to the choice of alternative dependent variables and estimators. The findings have major policy implications and provide insights into alternative routes to encouraging regional innovation.

  • 6.
    Averina, Elizaveta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Entrepreneurship and Innovation Luleå University of Technology Luleå Sweden;House of Innovation Stockholm School of Economics Stockholm Sweden.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Entrepreneurship and Innovation Luleå University of Technology Luleå Sweden.
    Assessing sustainability opportunities for circular business models2022In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 1464-1487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the unfolding climate crisis escalates, incumbent manufacturing companies are increasingly sensing and seizing sustainability opportunities—ideas that help to generate value in a more sustainable way than existing alternatives. Prior literature has underscored the importance of opportunity recognition and has theorized various types of circular business models to address sustainability in practice. However, there is a knowledge gap regarding the step in between: undertaking an assessment that provides a foundation for subsequently pursuing a circular business model. Based on a multiple case study of four innovation projects pursuing sustainability, this article identifies capability assessment, ecosystem alignment, and value-capture viability as key dimensions in evaluating sustainability opportunities prior to circular business model design and development. These insights are aggregated into a framework that allows companies to conduct a systematic assessment of sustainability opportunities in practice. The framework provides new theoretical implications for the literature on circular economy and business model innovation, and it offers hands-on advice for management practice. 

  • 7.
    Azadegan, Arash
    et al.
    New Mexico State University.
    Patel, Pankaj
    Ball State University.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Operational slack and venture survival2013In: Production and operations management, ISSN 1059-1478, E-ISSN 1937-5956, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Slack can act as a double-edged sword. While it can buffer against environmental threats to help ensure business continuity, slack canalso be costly and reduce profitability. In this study, we focus on operational slack, the form related to the firm’s production processes. We investigate the role of operational slack on firm survival during its venture stage, when its survival is significantly challenged by environmental threats. Specifically, we explore how change in three types of environmental uncertainty, namely dynamism, complexity and lack of munificence affect the relationship between operational slack and venture survival. Results suggest that with increase inenvironmental uncertainty, operational slack lowers the likelihood of venture failure.

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  • 8.
    Bencsik, Barbara
    et al.
    Institute of Technology Management, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Palmie, Maximilian
    Institute of Technology Management, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Department of Management/USN Business School, University of Vaasa/University of South-Eastern Norway, Finland/Norway.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Global Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland; Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    Gassmann, Oliver
    Institute of Technology Management, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Business models for digital sustainability: Framework, microfoundations of value capture, and empirical evidence from 130 smart city services2023In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 160, article id 113757Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emerging research stream on digital sustainability examines how digital technologies enable the creation of environmental and social value. The need to finance the creation of such value calls for a business model perspective that combines value creation and value capture. To extend the digital sustainability literature in this regard, we adopt a microfoundations perspective and argue that the configuration of value creation influences the decision of users to pay for a value proposition or not, which in turn affects organizational value capture. Applying a crisp-set qualitative comparative analysis to 130 smart city initiatives in Switzerland, we develop a three-dimensional framework of business models for digital sustainability. The framework comprises 12 theoretically possible business model types, representing distinct business model configurations. We contribute to the digital sustainability and the microfoundations literatures by analyzing, explaining, and classifying the diversity of digitally enabled business models in the context of smart cities.

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  • 9.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Sturm, Dennis
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Embracing entrepreneurial behavior in a research school2009In: Design has never been this cool: ICED 09, the 17th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 24 - 27 August 2009, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA ; proceedings volume / [ed] Magareta Norell Bergendahl; Martin Grimheden; Larry Leifer, Design Research Society, 2009, Vol. 1: Design processes, p. 245-256Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PIEp (Product Innovation Engineering programme) is a newly established research school in product development engineering with the aim to increase innovation capabilities in the Swedish industries and to promote entrepreneurial behavior. By following a bottom-up approach PIEp has been able to embrace and foster entrepreneurial behavior. As an outcome the young research school has been able to change preexisting mindsets and to encourage the PIEp PhD students to be more proactive, risk-taking and innovative. This paper presents the chain of events that have happened since the establishment of the PIEp research school. In an action research approach the authors additionally state their own perceptions. Providing rich, descriptive examples and explaining certain cases in detail it is outlined how the transformation of the initial idea has been pursued until today. The insights provided are made public for future research, comparison to other research schools, and to policy makers interested in founding new research schools.

  • 10.
    Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Johansson, Christian
    Assessment of team based innovation in a Product Service System development process2011In: Research into Design: Supporting Sustainable Product Development / [ed] Amaresh Chakrabarti, Bangalore, India: Research Publishing Services, 2011, p. 711-718Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is often measured based on how the product performs on the market. This makes it difficult to measure the performance of a team since the time to develop a product may take several years. In this paper we show the importance of creating a common ground and facilitation in a team, two aspects that is not easy measure, but should be assessed. We also discuss innovation on three interrelated organizational levels, the operational, which is the development team and in focus in this paper, the managerial and the strategic level. We found that companies need indicators to measure and/or assess performance on all three levels and thatmore research is needed to find the inter-links between the levels to prescribe measures and assessment points.

  • 11.
    Bradley, S.W
    et al.
    Baylor University.
    McMullen, J
    Patel, Pankaj
    Ball State University.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Searching wide or deep?: absorptive capacity, slack resources and the role of external search in small firm growth2011In: Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, ISSN 0740-7416, Vol. 31, no 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms often conduct external search for new opportunities, but not all search leads to growth. Integrating traditional explanations of search from behavioral theory with biological foraging models, we explain how absorptive capacity together with financial slack influence breadth or depth of search. Our findings from 291 small Swedish technology firms indicate that higher absorptive capacity increases search. Absorptive capacity had a stronger effect on breadth of search than for depth of search. We find that only depth of search leads to higher growth for small firms. Further, financial slack strengthened the absorptive capacity and search depth relationship of search relationship, but weakened the relationship between absorptive capacity and breadth of search. The findings are consistent with foraging models that account for resource availability.

  • 12.
    Brekke, Thomas
    et al.
    USN School of Business, Universitiy of South-Eastern Norway, Horten, Norway.
    Lenka, Sambit
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Kohtamäki, Marko
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. USN School of Business, Universitiy of South-Eastern Norway, Horten, Norway; School of Management, University of Vaasa, Vaasa, Finland.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. USN School of Business, Universitiy of South-Eastern Norway, Horten, Norway.
    Solem, Birgit Andrine Apenes
    USN School of Business, Universitiy of South-Eastern Norway, Horten, Norway.
    Overcoming barriers to transformation in manufacturing firms. A path-dependence perspective of digital servitization2023In: Review of Managerial Science, ISSN 1863-6683Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing firms struggle to break away from their pre-existing business models, offerings, routines, and capabilities. The present study used path dependency as a theoretical lens to investigate a single longitudinal case study of a leading manufacturing company based on in-depth interviews with senior executives and managers. The analysis contributes to extending the digital servitization and path-dependence literature by proposing four path-breaking mechanisms: (1) organizational reconfiguration, (2) reconfiguration of value offerings, (3) opportunity exploration, and (4) knowledge reconfiguration. The framework developed based on these mechanisms generated valuable insights for manufacturing firms seaking to to break away from their dominant paths. 

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  • 13.
    Bressanelli, Gianmarco
    et al.
    RISE Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, 25123 Brescia, Italy.
    Adrodegari, Federico
    RISE Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, 25123 Brescia, Italy.
    Pigosso, Daniela C. A.
    Section of Engineering Design and Product Development, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Department of Business, History and Social Science, USN School of Business, University of South-Eastern Norway, 3679 Notodden, Norway.
    Circular Economy in the Digital Age2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 9, article id 5565Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Bressanelli, Gianmarco
    et al.
    RISE Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, 25123 Brescia, Italy.
    Adrodegari, Federico
    RISE Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, 25123 Brescia, Italy.
    Pigosso, Daniela C. A.
    Section of Engineering Design and Product Development, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Department of Business, History and Social Science, USN School of Business, University of South-Eastern Norway, 3679 Notodden, Norway.
    Towards the Smart Circular Economy Paradigm: A Definition, Conceptualization, and Research Agenda2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 9, article id 4960Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The digital age we live in offers companies many opportunities to jointly advance sustainability and competitiveness. New digital technologies can, in fact, support the incorporation of circular economy principles into businesses, enabling new business models and facilitating the redesign of products and value chains. Despite this considerable potential, the convergence between the circular economy and these technologies is still underinvestigated. By reviewing the literature, this paper aims to provide a definition and a conceptual framework, which systematize the smart circular economy paradigm as an industrial system that uses digital technologies during the product life-cycle phases to implement circular strategies and practices aimed at value creation. Following this conceptualization, the classical, underlying circular economy principle, ‘waste equals food’, is reshaped into an equation more fitting for the digital age-that is to say, ‘waste + data = resource’. Lastly, this paper provides promising research directions to further develop this field. To advance knowledge on the smart circular economy paradigm, researchers and practitioners are advised to: (i) develop research from exploratory and descriptive to confirmatory and prescriptive purposes, relying on a wide spectrum of research methodologies; (ii) move the focus from single organizations to the entire ecosystem and value chain of stakeholders; (iii) combine different enabling digital technologies to leverage their synergistic potential; and (iv) assess the environmental impact of digital technologies to prevent potential rebound effects.

  • 15.
    Burstrom, Thommie
    et al.
    Department of Management and Organisation, Hanken School of Economics, Helsingfors, Finland.
    Lahti, Tom
    FLO Department, Hanken Svenska Handelshogskolan Foretagsledning och organisation, Helsingfors, Finland.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wartiovaara, Markus
    Business Lab, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Wincent, Joakim
    FLO Department, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Software Ecosystems Now and in the Future: A Definition, Systematic Literature Review, and Integration Into the Business and Digital Ecosystem Literature2022In: IEEE transactions on engineering management, ISSN 0018-9391, E-ISSN 1558-0040Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business settings and ecosystems have in the past three decades been transformed by software utilization. It is being applied in several industries shaping innovation—platforms—and business characteristics, thus attracting ever more interest from both practitioners and researchers. During the last 10 years, research on software ecosystems (SECOs) has expanded, and is strongly related to the development of digital ecosystems. This expansion has led to the need to review the status of SECO research, and the present article provides a state-of-the-art literature review on the topic. We explain the connection between the relatively new research field of SECOs and the traditional streams of ecosystem research. This article contributes novel definitions of SECOs and SECO configuration, and proposes a theoretical model illustrating the relationship between vital contingency categories and processes. We identify significant research gaps and present a future research agenda.

  • 16.
    Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Department of Management and Organisation, Hanken School of Economics.
    Lahti, Tom
    Department of Management and Organisation, Hanken School of Economics.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Department of Management, University of Vaasa, Finland.
    Wartiovaara, Markus
    Department of Management and Organisation, Hanken School of Economics.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Department of Management and Organisation, Hanken School of Economics; Global Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, University of St. Gallen.
    A definition, review, and extension of global ecosystems theory: Trends, architecture and orchestration of global VCs and mechanisms behind unicorns2023In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 157, article id 113605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prior Venture Capital research (VC) has examined the micro processes of syndication and alliance formation. However, a macro and more systemic view is lacking, where past research has neglected the global VC-ecosystem. Using a qualitative method and an abductive approach, we combine and integrate two strands of research, on VC and ecosystems, to shed light on the crucial dynamics in the VC industry. We provide a VC-ecosystem definition and portray the ecosystem architecture in a segmentation matrix of investor types and roles, including Active Hubs and Complementors. Moreover, our findings identify and explain central Hub orchestration mechanisms: enablers, governance, partner management, co-specialization, and nurturing. The study concludes with a discussion on the theoretical and managerial implications, and suggestions for future research on a global ecosystem, which operates at a higher level than the traditional firm-level ecosystems on which the previous research generally focuses.

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    fulltext
  • 17.
    Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Entrepreneurship, Hanken School of Economics, 00101 Helsinki, Finland.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Lahti, Tom
    Entrepreneurship, Hanken School of Economics, 00101 Helsinki, Finland..
    Wincent, Joakim
    Entrepreneurship, Hanken School of Economics, 00101 Helsinki, Finland.
    AI-enabled business-model innovation and transformation in industrial ecosystems: A framework, model and outline for further research2021In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 127, p. 85-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing incumbents find it difficult to integrate AI in their traditional business models. This paper draws on the research question: How does manufacturing incumbents use AI for enabling business model innovation in industrial ecosystems? We use qualitative method in order to study four large global manufacturing incumbents that are transforming their business models with AI. We performed more than 30 semi-structured in-depth interviews with strategic key personnel in order to understand how they have succeeded with implementing AI and transforming business models. Our main contribution establishes the need for AI business-model innovation to be aligned with ecosystem innovation. Specifically, in short-term incumbents may use ecosystem reconfiguration strategy, whereas long-term strategies relate to ecosystem revitalization, and resilience. Thus, we contribute by connecting organizational microelements with ecosystem macro dimensions and provide an evolutionary model envisioning how incumbents attempt to promote strategic transitions in their firms and ecosystems.

  • 18.
    Cedergren, S.I.
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Elfving, S.W.
    Ericsson Global Services Research.
    Eriksson, J.
    Mälardalen University.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    A road map for future research on industrial product-service systems (IPS2): a systematic review2012In: The Philosopher's Stone for Sustainability: Proceedings of the 4th CIRP International Conference on Industrial Product-Service Systems, Tokyo, Japan, November 8th-9th, 2012, Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2012, p. 185-190Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an ongoing trend to expand traditional offerings of selling goods towards providing value through services to customers. In academia the term Industrial Product-Service Systems (IPS2) describes this phenomenon. Although many articles have been published on IPS2 a systematic review is lacking. This paper presents a systematic review of the IPS2 domain. Five themes characterizing IPS2 are revealed: delivery, processes, value creation networks, knowledge management, and business models. IPS2 is concluded to be both a young and distributed field of research, with a scope that needs to expand in terms of the themes covered and number of empirical studies

  • 19.
    Cedergren, S.I.
    et al.
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University.
    Elfving, S.W.
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University.
    Eriksson, J.
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Analysis of the industrial product-service systems (IPS2) literature: A systematic review2012In: IEEE 6th International Conference on Management of Innovation and Technology, ICMIT 2012: Bali 11-13 June 2012, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 2012, p. 733-740Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Successful industrial goods-delivering companies are always looking for ways to develop and grow their business. A strong present trend is to expand the traditionally tangible offering by integrating intangible offerings i.e. services. In academia the term industrial product-service systems (IPS2) are being used to describe this paradigm shift. However, a systematic review of the IPS2 literature is lacking. In this paper publications regarding IPS2 are systematically reviewed. The result of our review has been categorized under five themes that we found characterizes IPS2: delivery, processes, value creation networks, knowledge management, and business models. Based on our findings a discussion is made and future research directions are identified

  • 20.
    Cedergren, Stefan
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Success factors and performance measurements: a missing link in product development?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Performance measurements are important for managing operation and supply chain activities. The literature within performance measurement and success factors in innovation and product development is vast, but with little cross-fertilization. In industry there is a clear consensus among manager’s that their measurements are not covering what is important to be successful. One explanation for this, as argued for in this paper, might be that there is a weak connection between what is considered to be important (a success factor) and what is actually measured by the performance measurement system in product development. In this paper the findings from a survey among large manufacturing companies in Sweden is presented. The paper is concluded with an analysis and discussion regarding why success factors are not represented in the performance measurement system and recommendations for future research.

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  • 21.
    Cenamor, Javier
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Department of Management, University of Vaasa, Vaasa, Finland.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    School of Social Sciences, Södertörn University, Södertörn, Sweden.
    Pesämaa, Ossi
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Entrepreneurship and Management, Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    Addressing dual embeddedness: The roles of absorptive capacity and appropriabilitymechanisms in subsidiary performance2019In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 78, p. 239-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how subsidiaries can manage dual embeddedness with both local partners and a multinational enterprise. Specifically, we examine the role of absorptive capacity and appropriability mechanisms on subsidiary performance. We analyse how absorptive capacity and appropriability enable subsidiaries to successfully address knowledge challenges related to internal and external networks. We conducted an empirical analysis on a sample of 165 subsidiaries. Our results suggest that absorptive capacity has a direct, positive effect on subsidiary performance, which is greater in emerging countries. The study also found an indirect effect of absorptive capacity on subsidiary performance, which is mediated through appropriability mechanisms. These findings extend the literature on international networks, dual embeddedness and absorptive capacity.

  • 22.
    Cenamor, Javier
    et al.
    Lund University, Department of Business Administration, School of Economics and Management, Lund, Sweden.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, School of Management, Vaasa, Finland.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Hanken School of Economics, Entrepreneurship and Management, Helsinki, Finland.University of St. Gallen, Global Center Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Institute of Technology Management, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    How entrepreneurial SMEs compete through digital platforms: The roles of digital platform capability, network capability and ambidexterity2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 100, p. 196-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization offers unprecedented opportunities for entrepreneurial small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). However, many entrepreneurial SMEs lack resources and capabilities or suffer from inertia, which hampers these opportunities. This study investigates how entrepreneurial SMEs can enhance performance through digital platforms. Specifically, the study examines the effect of digital platform capability and network capability on entrepreneurial SMEs’ financial performance. The study also examines how exploitation and exploration orientations moderate this relationship. Based on analysis of 230 entrepreneurial SMEs, the results indicate that digital platform capability has a positive indirect effect on entrepreneurial SMEs’ performance via network capability. The study also shows that exploitation and exploration orientations negatively and positively moderate this effect, respectively. The results suggest that entrepreneurial SMEs can enhance their performance through digital platform capability by aligning this capability with their orientation. These findings thereby enrich the literature on entrepreneurial SMEs and capabilities. 

  • 23.
    Cenamor, Javier
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Rönnberg Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Adopting a Platform Approach in Servitization: Leveraging the Value of Digitalization2017In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 192, p. 54-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how a platform approach facilitates the implementation of advanced service offerings in manufacturing firms. Understanding servitization through a platform approach is important because many manufacturing firms fail to manage the service paradox, that is, the challenge of simultaneously enriching the value proposition by adding services while maintaining cost levels. This study focuses on how adopting a platform approach leverages the value of digital and information technologies (e.g., smart and connected machines) for advanced service offerings. It is argued that a platform approach based on a modular architecture can enable manufacturers to pursue both customization and operational efficiency. Based on multiple case studies, the findings highlight the importance of information modules replacing product and service modules as the core modules for successful servitization. More specifically, the findings illustrates the journeys of manufacturing firms as they leverage value from information modules to facilitate the orchestrating role of back-end units and the builder role of front-end units.

  • 24.
    Cenamor, Javier
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Rönnberg Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Leveraging the Value of a Platform Approach for Servitization2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Cervantes, Michel
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Higher education in hydropower2006In: International Water Power and Dam Construction, ISSN 0306-400X, Vol. 58, no 7, p. 25-27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Chauhan, Chetna
    et al.
    School of Management, Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Dhir, Amandeep
    Department of Management, School of Business & Law, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway; The Norwegian School of Hotel Management, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stavanger, Norway; Optentia Research Focus Area, North-West University, Vanderbijlpark, South Africa.
    Linking circular economy and digitalisation technologies: A systematic literature review of past achievements and future promises2022In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 177, article id 121508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The circular economy (CE) has the potential to capitalise upon emerging digital technologies, such as big data, artificial intelligence (AI), blockchain and the Internet of things (IoT), amongst others. These digital technologies combined with business model innovation are deemed to provide solutions to myriad problems in the world, including those related to circular economy transformation. Given the societal and practical importance of CE and digitalisation, last decade has witnessed a significant increase in academic publication on these topics. Therefore, this study aims to capture the essence of the scholarly work at the intersection of the CE and digital technologies. A detailed analysis of the literature based on emerging themes was conducted with a focus on illuminating the path of CE implementation. The results reveal that IoT and AI play a key role in the transition towards the CE. A multitude of studies focus on barriers to digitalisation-led CE transition and highlight policy-related issues, the lack of predictability, psychological issues and information vulnerability as some important barriers. In addition, product-service system (PSS) has been acknowledged as an important business model innovation for achieving the digitalisation enabled CE. Through a detailed assessment of the existing literature, a viable systems-based framework for digitalisation enabled CE has been developed which show the literature linkages amongst the emerging research streams and provide novel insights regarding the realisation of CE benefits.

  • 27.
    Chen, Yihua
    et al.
    School of Business Administration, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, China.
    Visnjic, Ivanka
    ESADE Business School, Ramon Llull University, Barcelona, Spain.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. School of Management, University of Vaasa, Vaasa, Finland.
    Zhang, Zhengang
    School of Business Administration, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, China.
    On the road to digital servitization – The (dis)continuous interplay between business model and digital technology2021In: International Journal of Operations & Production Management, ISSN 0144-3577, E-ISSN 1758-6593, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 694-722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The authors seek to understand the process of digital servitization as a shift of manufacturing companies from the provision of standard products and services to smart solutions. Specifically, the authors focus on changes in the business model (i.e. the value proposition, the value delivery system and the value capture mechanism) for digital servitization.

    Design/methodology/approach – The authors examine a Chinese air conditioner manufacturer, Gree, who became the global leader with their smart solutions. These solutions included performance-based contracts underpinned by artificial intelligence (AI)-powered air conditioners that automatically adjust to environmental changes and are capable of remote monitoring and servicing thanks to its Internet of things (IoT) technology.

    Findings – To successfully offer smart solution value propositions, a manufacturer needs an ecosystem value delivery system composed of suppliers, distributors, partners and customers. Once the ecosystem relationships are well aligned, the manufacturer gains value with multiple value capture mechanisms (i.e. efficiency, accountability, shared customer value and novelty). To arrive at this point, a manufacturer has to pass through different stages that are characterized by both discontinuous and continuous interplay between business models and digital technologies. At the beginning of each stage, new value propositions and value delivery systems are first discontinuously created and then enabled with digital technology. As a result, new value capture mechanisms are activated. Meanwhile, the elements of the existing business model are continuously improved.

    Research limitations/implications – By combining process-perspective and business-model lenses, the authors offer nuanced insights into how digital servitization unfolds.

    Practical implications – Executives can obtain insights into the business model elements, they need to change over the course of digital servitization and how to manage the process.

    Originality/value – A longitudinal case study of a traditional manufacturer that has achieved stellar success through digital servitization business models development.

  • 28.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Digital and Circular Industrial Services (DigiCircle) Research Group, Innovation and Product Realisation research environment, Mälardalen University, Box 325, 631 05, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Kulkov, Ignat
    Digital and Circular Industrial Services (DigiCircle) Research Group, Innovation and Product Realisation research environment, Mälardalen University, Box 325, 631 05, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Digital and Circular Industrial Services (DigiCircle) Research Group, Innovation and Product Realisation research environment, Mälardalen University, Box 325, 631 05, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Future Energy Center, School of Business Society and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Division of Product Development, Faculty of Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Stefan, Ioana
    Digital and Circular Industrial Services (DigiCircle) Research Group, Innovation and Product Realisation research environment, Mälardalen University, Box 325, 631 05, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Enabling battery circularity: Unlocking circular business model archetypes and collaboration forms in the electric vehicle battery ecosystem2024In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 199, article id 123044Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To facilitate this transition, firms operating in the electric vehicle (EV) battery ecosystem must reassess their value creation, capture, and delivery methods. Although EV battery second life presents a promising solution for circularity, many vehicle manufacturers and stakeholders in the battery ecosystem struggle to adapt their organizations internally and externally due to a lack of insights into suitable circular business models. The purpose of this study is to identify viable archetypes of circular business models for EV battery second life and examine their implications on company collaborations within the EV battery ecosystem. Three main archetypes of circular business models are identified (i.e., extending, sharing, and looping business models) and further divided into eight sub-archetypes. These models are elucidated in terms of key business model dimensions, including value proposition, value co-creation, value delivery, and value capture. The paper provides visual representations of the necessary interactions and collaborations among companies in the EV battery ecosystem to effectively implement the proposed business model archetypes. This research contributes to the theory of circular business models in general, with specific relevance to EV battery circularity.

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  • 29.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Business Studies, School of Social Sciences, Södertörn University.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Department of Management, University of Vaasa.
    Social media engagement strategy: Investigation of marketing and R&D interfaces in manufacturing industry2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 74, p. 138-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that effective marketing and R&D interface is pivotal in a company's new product development performance and future competitiveness. The increased popularity of social media promised to enhance interaction, collaboration, and networking between the two functions. However, there is limited knowledge regarding the key activities, infrastructure requirements, and potential benefits of social media in the marketing and R&D interface. This study aims to advance the current understanding of social media engagement strategies, which facilitates improved marketing and R&D interfaces and ultimately NPD performance for manufacturing companies. Based on a multiple-case study in two manufacturing companies, this study first presents the role of social media in facilitating improved marketing and R&D interface within a B2B context. Second, it presents the adoption process of the social media engagement strategy for an evolving marketing and R&D interface. The adoption process is divided into three phases, namely coordination, cooperation, and coproduction, to provide detailed insights regarding full-scale social media engagement. Taken together, the study provides novel insights into industrial marketing management literature by exemplifying the role of social media and proposing a systematic social engagement strategy for improved marketing and R&D interface in the manufacturing industry.

  • 30.
    Del Sarto, Nicola
    et al.
    University of Florence, Florence, Italy.
    Ferrigno, Giulio
    Department of Economics and Business Management Sciences, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Via Necchi, 5, 20123, Milan, Italy.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Di Minin, Alberto
    Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna Institute of Management, Piazza Martiri della Libertà, 33, 56127, Pisa, Italy.
    Do start-ups benefit from coworking spaces? An empirical analysis of accelerators’ programs2023In: Review of Managerial Science, ISSN 1863-6683, E-ISSN 1863-6691, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 2471-2502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open innovation and innovation performance have been widely studied in the literature. However, few studies have examined the impact of openness to different types of external knowledge on start-ups’ innovation performance. Moreover, previous literature could be further complemented by additional investigation into how the coworking spaces provided by accelerator programs may engender informal sources of knowledge that enhance the innovation performance of accelerated start-ups. To address this research gap, we investigate whether start-ups participating in accelerator programs can enhance their innovation performance through information transfer from informal networks provided by business accelerator programs. In order to do so, we draw two-stage data collection data from 113 start-ups accelerated by Italian accelerators from 2013 to 2016 and the response data collected in 2018. Our results reveal that coopetitors, educators, and investors are beneficial for different innovation outcomes of accelerated start-ups. These findings contribute to the innovation management literature, the small business management literature, the literature on accelerators and the coworking spaces literature.

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  • 31.
    Einola, Suvi
    et al.
    University of Vaasa, Department of Management, PO Box 700, FI 65101 Vaasa, Finland.
    Kohtamäki, Marko
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. University of Vaasa, Department of Management, PO Box 700, FI 65101 Vaasa, Finland.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. University of Vaasa, Department of Management, PO Box 700, FI 65101 Vaasa, Finland.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Hanken School of Economics, PO Box 479, FI-00101 Helsinki, Finland.
    Retrospective relational sensemaking in R&D offshoring2017In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 63, p. 205-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To address the increasing relational challenges in international R&D collaboration, the present study develops a framework for understanding retrospective relational sensemaking in R&D offshore relationships. Using a comparative case study methodology, this study analyzes relational data from 56 interviews regarding four R&D offshore relationships between two large Swedish multinational companies and four R&D offshore partners. This study contributes to existing sensemaking theory by constructing a framework for retrospective relational sensemaking, including triggers and the phases of enactment, selection, and retention, to improve relational learning in R&D offshore relationships.

  • 32.
    Ekman, Jonas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Antti, Marta-Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Emami, Reza
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Kuhn, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Minami, Ichiro
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Gustafsson, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Zorzano Mier, María-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Milz, Mathias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Grahn, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Behar, Etienne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering.
    Wolf, Veronika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Dordlofva, Christo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Mendaza de Cal, Maria Teresa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Jamali, Maryam
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Roos, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Ottemark, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nieto, Chris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Soria Salinas, Álvaro Tomás
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Vázquez Martín, Sandra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nyberg, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Neikter, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Lindwall, Angelica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Fakhardji, Wissam
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Projekt: Rymdforskarskolan2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The Graduate School of Space Technology

  • 33.
    Eriksson, Per-Erik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Patel, Pankaj C.
    Villanova University, Villanova School of Business.
    Rönnberg Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Managing Interorganizational Innovation Projects: Mitigating the Negative Effects of Equivocality Through Knowledge Search Strategies2016In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 691-705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Equivocality, or divergent interpretations and understandings of tasks and knowledge, has negative effects on performance because it increases conflicts and creates communication and coordination challenges in inter-organizational innovation projects. However, equivocality may also stimulate team members to discuss beliefs and interpretations in ways that provide improved understanding of knowledge and tasks. We theorize that mitigation of negative effects of equivocality on project performance is conditional on explorative or exploitative knowledge search mode. Exploitative search (increasing search depth) allows for rapid learning based on the partners' existing knowledge, but it also limits a team's ability to interpret and combine diverse knowledge. Explorative search (increasing search breadth), on the other hand, allows for novel combinations of diverse knowledge and thereby alleviates the negative effect of equivocality on performance. Based on quantitative data from 251 respondents in 52 heavy-engineering innovation projects in four multinational corporations based in Sweden and from their 29 collaborating partner firms worldwide, we find that equivocality reduces project performance, but that joint explorative search mitigates the negative effect of equivocality on project performance. However, we do not find support for the moderation effect of exploitative search on the relationship between equivocality and project performance. Theoretical and managerial contributions as well as limitations and suggestions for future research are presented

  • 34.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Critical success factors in early new product development: a review and a conceptual model2018In: The International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, ISSN 1554-7191, E-ISSN 1555-1938, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 411-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on the front end in the New Product Development (NPD) literature is fragmented with respect to the identification and analysis of the factors that are critical to successful product development. The article has a two-fold purpose. First, it describes, analyses, and synthesizes those factors through a literature review of the research on the front end in NPD. Second, it conceptualizes a framework that features two types of success factors: foundational success factors (common to all the firm’s projects) and project-specific success factors (appropriate for the firm’s individual projects). The article makes recommendations for the management of this important phase of product development, discusses limitations of relevant previous research, and offers suggestions for future research. The article makes a theoretical contribution with its analysis and synthesis of the reasons for success in front-end activities and a practical contribution with its conceptual framework that can be used as an analytical tool by firms and their product managers.

  • 35.
    Fredström, Ashkan
    et al.
    Hanken School of Economics Biblioteksgatan 16, 65100, Vaasa, Finland.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, School of Management Wolffintie, 34 65200, Vaasa, Finland.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Hanken School of Economics Arkadiankatu 22, 00101 Helsinki, Finland; University of St. Gallen Dufourstrasse 50, 9000 St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Södertorn University 141 89, Huddinge, Sweden.
    What is the Market Value of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning? The Role of Innovativeness and Collaboration for Performance2022In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 180, article id 121716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As AI and ML technologies are increasingly incorporated into products, there is a need to understand the role of these incorporations in enhancing performance. This study uses new types of methodology related to textual data analysis to explore the question of whether there is a difference between market sentiments—and consequently marketing and business performance—when it comes to communicating either AI or ML. We test and confirm the hypothesis that AI rather than ML attracts more positive sentiments in the marketplace. Additionally, we find that AI is mostly used when the discussion centers on innovativeness, and that discussions concerning collaboration in these technologies attract more positive sentiments. We further contribute methodologically by leveraging textual data available online on the titles of web-page contents and the results of the Vader sentiment analysis to test our hypothesis. We conclude that, to enhance business performance, firms should communicate using AI-related vocabulary especially when the topic is innovativeness and collaboration.

  • 36.
    Fredström, Ashkan
    et al.
    Hanken School of Economics Biblioteksgatan 16, 65100 Vaasa, Finland.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Hanken School of Economics Arkadiankatu 22, 00101 Helsinki, Finland. University of St. Gallen Dufourstrasse 50, 9000 St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Södertörn University 141 89 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, School of Management Wolffintie, 34 65200 Vaasa, Finland.
    Tracking innovation diffusion: AI analysis of large-scale patent data towards an agenda for further research2021In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 165, article id 120524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent advances in AI algorithms and computational power have led to opportunities for new methods and tools. Particularly when it comes to detecting the current status of inter-industry technologies, the new tools can be of great assistance. This is important because the research focus has been on how firms generate value through managing their business models. However, further attention needs to be given to the external technological opportunities that also contribute to value creation in firms. We applied unsupervised machine learning techniques, particularly DBSCAN, in an attempt to generate a macro-level technological map. Our results show that AI and machine learning tools can indeed be used for these purposes, and DBSCAN is a potential algorithm. Further research is needed to improve the maps and to use the generated data to study related phenomena including entrepreneurship.

  • 37.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Dasselaar, Manfred
    Ericsson SE.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    When product meets service: Digitalizing industrial innovation2015In: Ericsson Business Review, ISSN 1653-9486, no 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 38.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. House of Innovation, Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, Finland.
    The four fatal mistakes holding back circular business models2021In: MIT Sloan Management Review, ISSN 1532-9194, E-ISSN 1532-8937, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 68-72Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Framtidens Produktframtagning i Svenska Företag: Trender, Implikationer och Reflektioner2014Report (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Framtidens produktframtagningsprocess i svenska företag: Vilka trender påverkar mest och hur behöver företagen förändra sina utvecklingsprocesser?2013In: Management of Innovation and Technology, ISSN 2001-208X, no 3, p. 5-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 41.
    Gama, Fabio
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Idea generation and open innovation in SMEs: When does market‐based collaboration pay off most?2019In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 113-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) largely depend on proficient idea generation activities to improve their front-end innovation performance, yet the liabilities of newness and smallness often hamper SMEs’ ability to benefit from systematic idea generation. To compensate for these liabilities, many SMEs adopt an open innovation approach by collaborating with market-based partners such as customers and suppliers. This study investigates the relationship between SMEs’ systematic idea generation and front-end performance and investigates the moderating role of market-based partnership for SMEs. Drawing on a survey of 146 Swedish manufacturing SMEs, this study provides two key contributions. First, the systematic idea generation and front-end performance relationship in SMEs is non-linear. Accordingly, higher levels of front-end performance are achieved when idea generation activities are highly systematic. Second, the returns from higher levels of systematic idea generation are positively moderated by market-based partnerships. Thus, external cooperation with customers and suppliers pays off most toward front-end performance when SMEs have highly systematic idea generation processes. These results indicate a contingency perspective on the role of external partnerships. They also have implications for research into the front-end of innovation and open innovation in the context of SMEs.

  • 42.
    Gama, Fabio
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Idea generation in SMEs: when does market-based partnership pay off most?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Gama, Fabio
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Systematic Idea Generation and Organizational Capabilities for Front-End Innovation Performance in SMEs2017In: Innovation ManagementArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This study seeks to answer two key questions about the front-end innovation: when do idea generation activities involving internal and external partner’s payoff, and which organizational capabilities support idea generation activities for achieving high front-end performance?

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 44. Gama, Fábio
    et al.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Luleå University of Technology, Centre for Management of Innovation and Technology in Process Industry, Promote.
    Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Centre for Management of Innovation and Technology in Process Industry, Promote. Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Untangling capabilities for managing the front end of innovationIn: Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the vital and often underemphasized front end of innovation. It aims to explore how firms utilize organizational capabilities to manage multiple sources of fuzziness (uncertainty, equivocality, and complexity). In so doing, we use the capability- and knowledge-based view to examine the use of firms’ capabilities to navigate the front end process from vague ideas towards corroborated product definition. In our qualitative case of seven manufacturing firms, we explore practices, methods, and routines for managing the front end. We explain that new product ideas can be classified according to different degrees of fuzziness, which implies that not all product ideas can or should be treated in the same way. In fact, certain capabilities are more important for managing the development of ideas at low (i.e. process management and idea refinement) and high (problem formulation and problem solution) levels of fuzziness. Ultimately, we suggest a theoretical framework that elucidates how firms use two distinct paths (i.e. tolerance-based or reduction-based) to transform early new product ideas into corroborated product definitions. In doing so, our results guide project members in matching the magnitude of knowledge problems with organizational capabilities and thereby increase front-end performance.

  • 45.
    Gama, Fábio
    et al.
    Innovation Management, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden; Business Administration, Santa Catarina State University, Florianópolis, Brazil.
    Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Networked Value Systems, University of Vaasa, Vaasa, Finland.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. House of Innovation, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Entrepreneurship and Management, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; Global Center Entrepreneurship and Innovation, University of St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Exploratory and exploitative capability paths for innovation: A contingency framework for harnessing fuzziness in the front end2022In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 113, article id 102416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the results of a multiple case study of seven manufacturing firms, a contingency framework for harnessing fuzziness in the front end of innovation is proposed by delineating two discrete capability paths through which new product ideas are developed into corroborated product definitions. The study illustrates that ideas characterized by high levels of fuzziness benefit from following an exploratory path, where the creative potential of fuzziness is embraced by deploying problem-formulation and problem-solving capabilities. In contrast, ideas at low levels of fuzziness benefit from following an exploitative path, where fuzziness is tolerated by drawing upon idea-refinement and process-management capabilities. When the fuzziness level of the idea and the set of capabilities to develop the idea are poorly aligned, the idea-development process is either inefficient or runs the risk of stalling. These findings have theoretical and practical implications for the front end of innovation and new product idea development.

  • 46.
    Garcia Martin, Patricia Carolina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    How Can Small Innovative Firms Successfully Scale Digital Solutions in Traditional Industries?2023In: Proceedings of the Spring Servitization Conference: The Role of Servitizationin Grand Challenges, Helsinki, Finland / [ed] Ali Z. Big; Marko Kohtamäki; Rodrigo Rabetino; Tim Baines, Aston Business School, UK , 2023, p. 102-107Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Garcia Martin, Patricia Carolina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Reverse knowledge transfer in digital servitization: A global approach to service provision2022In: Proceedings of the Spring Servitization Conference: Achieving net-zero through Servitization / [ed] Ali Z. Bigdeli; Mario Rapaccini; Nicola Saccani; Federico Adrodegari; Tim Baines, Aston Business School, UK , 2022, p. 53-60Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Digital servitization provides new opportunities for manufacturers to compete acrossmultiple markets. However, global digital service provision is complex and knowledge intensive, as itrequires alignment with subsidiaries to ensure adaptation to local customers’ needs. The purpose ofthis study is to understand how manufacturers engaging in digital servitization can leverage reverseknowledge transfer (RKT) from subsidiaries to achieve global competitive advantages.

    Design/Methodology/Approach: A qualitative multiple-case study including 43 interviews is used toinvestigate the RKT in three manufacturer-subsidiary cases taking place during the provision of digitalservitization solution packages in progressive global markets.

    Findings: This study identifies three crucial types of subsidiary generated knowledge namely, digitalknowledge, customer knowledge, and needs analysis knowledge. Leveraging such knowledge,manufacturers are able to mitigate the operational challenges of global digital service provision, andrealise the benefits in the forms of financial performance, efficient rollout of the digital servitizationsolution, and the expansion of the digital service portfolio.

    Originality/Value: Even though there has been increasing interest of scholars towards global digitalservice provision, there is limited knowledge about how manufacturers manage knowledge flowsbeyond the boundaries of a single market. This study extends current knowledge by focusing onmanufacturers’ digital service provision in multiple global markets. In addition, by focusing onsubsidiaries’ perspective, this study brings forward their critical role and impact on the achievementof global competitive advantages. This study introduces the concept of RKT in digital servitizationliterature exploring the role and impact of the subsidiary, actor that has received scant attention inthe servitization literature. 

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    fulltext
  • 48.
    Garcia Martin, Patricia Carolina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    The relevance of service units in digital servitization: exploring maximisation mechanisms in the value capture process2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Garcia Martin, Patricia Carolina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of South Eastern Norway, USN Business School.
    Nair, Sujith
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Nord University, Norway.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of South Eastern Norway, USN Business School; Department of Management, University of Vaasa.
    Managing start-up – incumbent digital solution co-creation: a four-phase process for intermediation in innovative contexts2023In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As incumbents strive to collaborate with start-ups in the pursuit of cutting-edge digital solutions, the complexities posed by disparate partners and their innovative endeavours often lead to intricate tensions. Our research underscores the critical role of innovation intermediaries in enabling a successful digital co-creation, yet a deeper understanding of this novel and evolving context is required. Through a comprehensive study of two innovation intermediaries, five incumbent companies, and eleven start-ups, we shed light on how intermediaries can effectively mitigate the hard-to-manage tensions that emerge. Our analysis uncovers three primary tensions: incompatible digital co-creation cultures, divergent digital innovation operations, and misaligned technical capabilities. We further propose a four-phase process for innovation intermediation, including the establishment of digital co-creation foundations, catalysing digital innovation projects, orchestrating the co-creation process, and scaling the resulting outcomes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 50.
    Garcia Martin, Patricia Carolina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    The Role of Innovation Intermediaries in Managing Corporate –Start-up Collaborations2022Conference paper (Refereed)
123456 1 - 50 of 266
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