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  • 1.
    Arridge, Christopher S.
    et al.
    Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Department of Space and Climate Physics.
    Agnor, Craig B.
    University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy.
    André, Nicolas
    Centre d’Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, Toulouse.
    Baines, Kevin H.
    NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena.
    Fletcher, Leigh N.
    Gautier, Daniel
    LESIA, CNRS-Observatoire de Paris.
    Hofstadter, Mark D.
    NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena.
    Jones, Geraint H.
    Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Department of Space and Climate Physics.
    Lamy, Laurent
    LESIA, CNRS-Observatoire de Paris.
    Langevin, Yves
    Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale.
    Mousis, Olivier
    Institut UTINAM, CNRS, OSU THETA.
    Nettelmann, Nadine
    Universität Rostock.
    Russell, Christopher T.
    Institute of Geophysics and Meteorology, University of Cologne.
    Stallard, Tom
    Physics and Astronomy Department, Ohio University.
    Tiscareno, Matthew S.
    Cornell University, Ithaca.
    Tobie, Gabriel
    LPG, CNRS.
    Bacon, Andrew
    Systems Engineering and Asssessment Ltd..
    Chaloner, Chris
    Systems Engineering and Asssessment Ltd..
    Guest, Michael
    Systems Engineering and Asssessment Ltd..
    Kemble, Steve
    EADS, Astrium.
    Peacocke, Lisa
    EADS, Astrium.
    Achilleos, Nicholas
    Physics and Astronomy Department, Ohio University.
    Andert, Thomas P.
    Universität der Bundeswehr.
    Banfield, Don
    Cornell University, Ithaca.
    Barabash, Stas
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Centre for Astrobiology, Madrid.
    Zarka, Philippe
    LESIA, CNRS-Observatoire de Paris.
    Uranus Pathfinder: Exploring the origins and evolution of Ice Giant planets2012In: Experimental astronomy (Print), ISSN 0922-6435, E-ISSN 1572-9508, Vol. 33, no 2-3, p. 753-791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The "Ice Giants" Uranus and Neptune are a different class of planet compared to Jupiter and Saturn. Studying these objects is important for furthering our understanding of the formation and evolution of the planets, and unravelling the fundamental physical and chemical processes in the Solar System. The importance of filling these gaps in our knowledge of the Solar System is particularly acute when trying to apply our understanding to the numerous planetary systems that have been discovered around other stars. The Uranus Pathfinder (UP) mission thus represents the quintessential aspects of the objectives of the European planetary community as expressed in ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025. UP was proposed to the European Space Agency's M3 call for medium-class missions in 2010 and proposed to be the first orbiter of an Ice Giant planet. As the most accessible Ice Giant within the M-class mission envelope Uranus was identified as the mission target. Although not selected for this call the UP mission concept provides a baseline framework for the exploration of Uranus with existing low-cost platforms and underlines the need to develop power sources suitable for the outer Solar System. The UP science case is based around exploring the origins, evolution, and processes at work in Ice Giant planetary systems. Three broad themes were identified: (1) Uranus as an Ice Giant, (2) An Ice Giant planetary system, and (3) An asymmetric magnetosphere. Due to the long interplanetary transfer from Earth to Uranus a significant cruise-phase science theme was also developed. The UP mission concept calls for the use of a Mars Express/Rosetta-type platform to launch on a Soyuz-Fregat in 2021 and entering into an eccentric polar orbit around Uranus in the 2036-2037 timeframe. The science payload has a strong heritage in Europe and beyond and requires no significant technology developments. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  • 2.
    Atreya, Sushil
    et al.
    University of Michigan.
    Squyres, Steve
    Cornell University, Ithaca.
    Mahaffy, Paul
    Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Leshin, Laurie
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York.
    Franz, Heather
    Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Trainer, Melissa
    Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Wong, Michael
    University of Michigan.
    McKay, Christopher
    NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field.
    Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael
    Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Madrid.
    MSL/SAM Measurements of Non Condensable Volatiles, Comparison with Viking Lander, and Implications for Seasonal Cycle2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bhardwaj, Anshuman
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Identification and Mapping of Glacier-Like Forms (GLFs) Near Martian Subpolar Latitudes2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bhardwaj, Anshuman
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Sam, Lydia
    Department of Environmental Science, Sharda University.
    Akanksha, Akanksha
    Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Kumar, Rejesh
    Department of Environmental Science, Sharda University.
    UAVs as remote sensing platform in glaciology: Present applications and future prospects2016In: Remote Sensing of Environment, ISSN 0034-4257, E-ISSN 1879-0704, Vol. 175, p. 196-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Satellite remote sensing is an effective way to monitor vast extents of global glaciers and snowfields. However, satellite remote sensing is limited by spatial and temporal resolutions and the high costs involved in data acquisition. Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)-based glaciological studies are gaining pace in recent years due to their advantages over conventional remote sensing platforms. UAVs are easy to deploy, with the option of alternating the sensors working in visible, infrared, and microwave wavelengths. The high spatial resolution remote sensing data obtained from these UAV-borne sensors are a significant improvement over the data obtained by traditional remote sensing. The cost involved in data acquisition is minimal and researchers can acquire imagery according to their schedule and convenience. We discuss significant glaciological studies involving UAV as remote sensing platforms. This is the first review work, exclusively dedicated to highlight UAV as a remote sensing platform in glaciology. We examine polar and alpine applications of UAV and their future prospects in separate sections and present an extensive reference list for the readers, so that they can delve into their topic of interest. Because the technology is still widely unexplored for snow and glaciers, we put a special emphasis on discussing the future prospects of utilising UAVs for glaciological research.

  • 5.
    Bhardwaj, Anshuman
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Sam, Lydia
    Department of Environmental Science, Sharda University.
    Bhardwaj, Akanksha
    Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    LiDAR remote sensing of the cryosphere: Present applications and future prospects2016In: Remote Sensing of Environment, ISSN 0034-4257, E-ISSN 1879-0704, Vol. 177, p. 125-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cryosphere consists of frozen water and includes lakes/rivers/sea ice, glaciers, ice caps/sheets, snow cover, and permafrost. Because highly reflective snow and ice are the main components of the cryosphere, it plays an important role in the global energy balance. Thus, any qualitative or quantitative change in the physical properties and extents of the cryosphere affects global air circulation, ocean and air temperatures, sea level, and ocean current patterns. Due to the hardships involved in collecting ground control points and field data for high alpine glaciers or vast polar ice sheets, several researchers are currently using remote sensing. Satellites provide an effective space-borne platform for remotely sensing frozen areas at the global and regional scales. However, satellite remote sensing has several constraints, such as limited spatial and temporal resolutions and expensive data acquisition. Therefore, aerial and terrestrial remote sensing platforms and sensors are needed to cover temporal and spatial gaps for comprehensive cryospheric research. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) antennas form a group of active remote sensors that can easily be deployed on all three platforms, i.e., satellite, aerial, and terrestrial. The generation of elevation data for glacial and snow-covered terrain from photogrammetry requires high contrast amongst various reflective surfaces (ice, snow, firn, and slush). Conventional passive optical remote sensors do not provide the necessary accuracy, especially due to the unavailability of reliable ground control points. However, active LiDAR sensors can fill this research gap and provide high-resolution and accurate Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). Due to the obvious advantages of LiDAR over conventional passive remote sensors, the number of LiDAR-based cryospheric studies has increased in recent years. In this review, we highlight studies that have utilised LiDAR sensors for the cryospheric research of various features, such as snow cover, polar ice sheets and their atmospheres, alpine glaciers, and permafrost. Because this technology shows immense promise for applications in future cryospheric research, we also emphasise the prospects of utilising LiDAR sensors. In this paper, a large compilation of relevant references is presented to allow readers to explore particular topics of interest.

  • 6.
    Bhardwaj, Anshuman
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Sam, Lydia
    Institut für Kartographie, Technische Universität Dresden.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Rock glaciers as proxies for identifying terrestrial and analogous Martian permafrost2016In: XI. International Conference On Permafrost: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Günther, F. and Morgenstern, A., Potsdam: Bibliothek Wissenschaftspark Albert Einstein , 2016, p. 535-537Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bhardwaj, Anshuman
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Sam, Lydia
    Institut für Kartographie, Technische Universität Dresden.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Zorzano Mier, Maria-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Fonseca, Ricardo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martian slope streaks as plausible indicators of transient water activity2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 7074Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Slope streaks have been frequently observed in the equatorial, low thermal inertia and dusty regions of Mars. The reason behind their formation remains unclear with proposed hypotheses for both dry and wet mechanisms. Here, we report an up-to-date distribution and morphometric investigation of Martian slope streaks. We find: (i) a remarkable coexistence of the slope streak distribution with the regions on Mars with high abundances of water-equivalent hydrogen, chlorine, and iron; (ii) favourable thermodynamic conditions for transient deliquescence and brine development in the slope streak regions; (iii) a significant concurrence of slope streak distribution with the regions of enhanced atmospheric water vapour concentration, thus suggestive of a present-day regolith-atmosphere water cycle; and (iv) terrain preferences and flow patterns supporting a wet mechanism for slope streaks. These results suggest a strong local regolith-atmosphere water coupling in the slope streak regions that leads to the formation of these fluidised features. Our conclusions can have profound astrobiological, habitability, environmental, and planetary protection implications

  • 8.
    Bhardwaj, Anshuman
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Sam, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Institut für Kartographie, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany. Department of Environmental Science, Sharda University, Greater Noida, India.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC ‐ UGR), Armilla, Spain. UK Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Zorzano Mier, María-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Centro de Astrobiología (INTA ‐ CSIC), Madrid, Spain.
    Are Slope Streaks Indicative of Global‐Scale Aqueous Processes on Contemporary Mars?2019In: Reviews of geophysics, ISSN 8755-1209, E-ISSN 1944-9208, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 48-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Slope streaks are prevalent and intriguing dark albedo surface features on contemporary Mars. Slope streaks are readily observed in the equatorial and subequatorial dusty regolith regions with low thermal inertia. They gradually fade over decadal timescales. The proposed mechanisms for their formation vary widely based on several physicochemical and geomorphological explanations. The scientific community is divided in proposing both dry and wet mechanisms for the formation of slope streaks. Here we perform a systematic evaluation of the literature for these wet and dry mechanisms. We discuss the probable constraints on the various proposed mechanisms and provide perspectives on the plausible process driving global‐scale slope streak formation on contemporary Mars. Although per our understanding, a thorough consideration of the global distribution of slope streaks, their morphology and topography, flow characteristics, physicochemical and atmospheric coincidences, and terrestrial analogies weighs more in favor of several wet mechanisms, we acknowledge that such wet mechanisms cannot explain all the reported morphological and terrain variations of slope streaks. Thus, we suggest that explanations considering both dry and wet processes can more holistically describe all the observed morphological variations among slope streaks. We further acknowledge the constraints on the resolutions of remote sensing data and on our understanding of the Martian mineralogy, climate, and atmosphere and recommend continuous investigations in this direction using future remote sensing acquisitions and simulations. In this regard, finding more wet and dry terrestrial analogs for Martian slope streaks and studying them at high spatiotemporal resolutions can greatly improve our understanding.

  • 9.
    Bhardwaj, Anshuman
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Sam, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Zorzano Mier, María-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Discovery of recurring slope lineae candidates in Mawrth Vallis, Mars2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 2040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    utside of established RSL regions and further prompt the inclusion of a new geographical region within the RSL candidate group. Our inferences on the RSL candidates are based on several morphological and geophysical evidences and analogies: (i) the dimensions of the RSL candidates are consistent with confirmed mid-latitude RSL; (ii) albedo and thermal inertia values are comparable to those of other mid-latitude RSL sites; and (iii) features are found in a summer season image and on the steep and warmest slopes. These results denote the plausible presence of transient liquid brines close to the previously proposed landing ellipse of the ExoMars rover, rendering this site particularly relevant to the search of life. Further investigations of Mawrth Vallis carried out at higher spatial and temporal resolutions are needed to identify more of such features at local scales to maximize the scientific return from the future Mars rovers, to prevent probable biological contamination during rover operations, to evade damage to rover components as brines can be highly corrosive, and to quantify the ability of the regolith at mid-latitudes to capture atmospheric water which is relevant for in-situ-resource utilization.

  • 10.
    Bhardwaj, Anshuman
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Sam, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR), Armilla, Granada, Spain.
    Zorzano Mier, María-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Centro de Astrobiología (INTA-CSIC), Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid, Spain.
    Distribution and Morphologies of Transverse Aeolian Ridges in ExoMars 2020 Rover Landing Site2019In: Remote Sensing, ISSN 2072-4292, E-ISSN 2072-4292, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aeolian processes are believed to play a major role in the landscape evolution of Mars. Investigations on Martian aeolian landforms such as ripples, transverse aeolian ridges (TARs), and dunes, and aeolian sediment flux measurements are important to enhance our understanding of past and present wind regimes, the ongoing dust cycle, landscape evolution, and geochemistry. These aeolian bedforms are often comprised of loose sand and sharply undulating topography and thus pose a threat to mobility and maneuvers of Mars rovers. Here we present a first-hand account of the distribution, morphologies, and morphometrics of TARs in Oxia Planum, the recently selected ExoMars 2020 Rover landing site. The gridded mapping was performed for contiguous stretches of TARs within all the landing ellipses using 57 sub-meter high resolution imaging science experiment (HiRISE) scenes. We also provide the morphological descriptions for all types of TARs present within the landing ellipses. We use HiRISE digital terrain models (DTMs) along with the images to derive morphometric information for TARs in Oxia Planum. In general, the average areal TAR coverage was found to be 5.4% (±4.9% standard deviation), increasing from west to east within the landing ellipses. We report the average TAR morphometrics in the form of crest–ridge width (131.1 ± 106.2 m), down-wind TAR length (17.6 ± 10.1 m), wavelength (37.3 ± 11.6 m), plan view aspect ratio (7.1 ± 2.3), inter-bedform spacing (2.1 ± 1.1), slope (10.6° ± 6.1°), predominant orientations (NE-SW and E-W), and height (1.2 ± 0.8 m). While simple TARs are predominant, we report other TAR morphologies such as forked TAR, wavy TAR with associated smaller secondary ripples, barchan-like TAR, networked TAR, and mini-TARs from the region. Our results can help in planning the rover traverses in terms of both safe passage and scientific returns favoring aeolian research, particularly improving our understanding of TARs.

  • 11.
    Bhardwaj, Anshuman
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Sam, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martín-Torres, F. Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Zorzano, María-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Revisiting enigmatic Martian slope streaks2019In: Earth Space and Science News - Editors Vox, Vol. 100Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Bhardwaj, Anshuman
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Singh, Shaktiman
    Institut für Kartographie, Technische Universität Dresden.
    Sam, Lydia
    Institut für Kartographie, Technische Universität Dresden.
    Bhardwaj, Akanksha
    Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Singh, Atar
    Department of Environmental Science, Sharda University.
    Kumar, Rajesh
    Department of Environmental Science, Sharda University.
    MODIS-based estimates of strong snow surface temperature anomaly related to high altitude earthquakes of 20152017In: Remote Sensing of Environment, ISSN 0034-4257, E-ISSN 1879-0704, Vol. 188, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high levels of uncertainty associated with earthquake prediction render earthquakes some of the worst natural calamities. Here, we present our observations of MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived Land Surface Temperature (LST) anomaly for earthquakes in the largest tectonically active Himalayan and Andean mountain belts. We report the appearance of fairly detectable pre-earthquake Snow Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies. We use 16 years (2000–2015) of MODIS LST time-series data to robustly conclude our findings for three of the most destructive earthquakes that occurred in 2015 in the high mountains of Nepal, Chile, and Afghanistan. We propose the physical basis behind higher sensitivity of snow towards geothermal emissions. Although the preliminary appearance of SST anomalies and their amplitudes vary, we propose employing a global-scale monitoring system for detecting and studying such spatio-temporal geophysical signals. With the advent of improved remote sensors, we anticipate that such efforts can be another step towards improved earthquake predictions.

  • 13.
    Bhardwaj, Anshuman
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Department of Environmental Science, Sharda University.
    Singh, Shaktiman
    Department of Environmental Science, Sharda University,.
    Sam, Lydia
    Department of Environmental Science, Sharda University,.
    Joshi, PK
    School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.
    Bhardwaj, Akanksha
    Banaras Hindu University.
    Martín-Torres, Javier F.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR).
    Kumar, Rajesh
    Department of Environmental Science, Sharda University.
    A review on remotely sensed land surface temperature anomaly as an earthquake precursor2017In: International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, ISSN 0303-2434, Vol. 63, p. 158-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The low predictability of earthquakes and the high uncertainty associated with their forecasts make earthquakes one of the worst natural calamities, capable of causing instant loss of life and property. Here, we discuss the studies reporting the observed anomalies in the satellite-derived Land Surface Temperature (LST) before an earthquake. We compile the conclusions of these studies and evaluate the use of remotely sensed LST anomalies as precursors of earthquakes. The arrival times and the amplitudes of the anomalies vary widely, thus making it difficult to consider them as universal markers to issue earthquake warnings. Based on the randomness in the observations of these precursors, we support employing a global-scale monitoring system to detect statistically robust anomalous geophysical signals prior to earthquakes before considering them as definite precursors.

  • 14.
    Bish, D.L.
    et al.
    Indiana University, Department of Geological Sciences, Bloomington.
    Blake, D.F.
    NASA Ames.
    Vaniman, D.T.
    Planetary Science Institute, Tucson.
    Chipera, S.J.
    CHK Energy.
    Morris, R.V.
    NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston.
    Ming, D.W.
    NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston.
    Treiman, A.H.
    Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston.
    Sarrazin, P.
    In-Xitu, Campbell, California.
    Morrison, S.M.
    Department of Geology, University of Arizona, Tucson.
    Downs, R.T.
    Department of Geology, University of Arizona, Tucson.
    Achilles, C.N.
    ESCG/UTC Aerospace Systems, Houston.
    Yen, A.S.
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
    Bristow, T.F.
    NASA Ames.
    Crisp, J.A.
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
    Morookian, J.M.
    NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena.
    Farmer, J.D.
    Department of Geological Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe.
    Rampe, E.B.
    NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston.
    Stolper, E.M.
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
    Spanovich, N.
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Centro de Astrobiología (CAB).
    X-ray diffraction results from Mars Science Laboratory: Mineralogy of Rocknest at Gale Crater2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 341, no 6153, article id 1238932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity scooped samples of soil from the Rocknest aeolian bedform in Gale crater. Analysis of the soil with the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) x-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument revealed plagioclase (~An57), forsteritic olivine (~Fo62), augite, and pigeonite, with minor K-feldspar, magnetite, quartz, anhydrite, hematite, and ilmenite. The minor phases are present at, or near, detection limits. The soil also contains 27 ± 14 weight percent x-ray amorphous material, likely containing multiple Fe3+- and volatile-bearing phases, including possibly a substance resembling hisingerite. The crystalline component is similar to the normative mineralogy of certain basaltic rocks from Gusev crater on Mars and of martian basaltic meteorites. The amorphous component is similar to that found on Earth in places such as soils on the Mauna Kea volcano, Hawaii.

  • 15.
    Bridges, N.T.
    et al.
    Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel.
    Blaney, D.L.
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
    Day, M.D.
    Department of Geological Sciences, Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin.
    Herkenhoff, K.E.
    U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff.
    Lanza, N.L.
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Mouélic, S. Le
    CNRS/Université de Nantes.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Instituto Andaluz de Cienccias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR), Grenada.
    Maurice, S.
    IRAP, CNRS-Université Toulouse.
    Newman, C.E.
    Ashima Research, Pasadena.
    Newsom, H.E.
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.
    Wiens, R.C.
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Zorzano, M.-P.
    Centro de Astrobiologia, INTA-CSIC, Madrid.
    Rock abrasion and landscape modification by windblown sand as documented by the MSL Curiosity rover2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Buch, Aranaud
    et al.
    LGPM, Ecole Centrale Paris, Chatenay-Malabry.
    Freissinet, Caroline
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Szopa, Cyril
    LATMOS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Versailles Saint-Quentin & CNRS, Guyancourt.
    Glavin, Danny
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Coll, Patrice
    Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, Université Paris-Est Créteil, Université Paris Diderot and CNRS, Créteil.
    Cabane, Michel
    LATMOS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Versailles Saint-Quentin & CNRS, Guyancourt.
    Eigenbrode, Jen
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael
    Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
    Stern, Jen
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Coscia, David
    LATMOS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Versailles Saint-Quentin & CNRS, Guyancourt.
    Teinturier, Samuel
    LATMOS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Versailles Saint-Quentin & CNRS, Guyancourt.
    Dworkin, Jason
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Mahaffy, Paul
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Madrid.
    Wet Chemistry on SAM: How it Helps to Detect Organics on Mars2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Cabane, Michel
    et al.
    LATMOS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Versailles Saint-Quentin & CNRS, Guyancourt.
    Coll, Patrice
    Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, Université Paris-Est Créteil, Université Paris Diderot and CNRS, Créteil.
    Szopa, Cyril
    LATMOS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Versailles Saint-Quentin & CNRS, Guyancourt.
    Coscia, David
    LATMOS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Versailles Saint-Quentin & CNRS, Guyancourt.
    Buch, Aranaud
    LGPM, Ecole Centrale Paris, Chatenay-Malabry.
    Teinturier, Samuel
    LATMOS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Versailles Saint-Quentin & CNRS, Guyancourt.
    Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael
    Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
    Gaboriaud, Alain
    CNES.
    Mahaffy, Paul
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Madrid.
    Gas-chromatographic analysis of Mars soil samples at Rocknest site with the SAM instrument onboard Curiosity2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Castro, Juan Francisco Buenestado
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Mier, Maria-Paz Zorzano
    Centro de Astrobiologia, INTA-CSIC, Madrid.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Liquid water at crater Gale, Mars2015In: Journal of Astrobiology and Outreach, ISSN 2332-2519, Vol. 3, no 3, article id 131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suspicion that Mars could have transient liquid water on its surface through deliquescence of salts to form aqueous solutions or brines is an old proposal whose inquiry was boosted by Phoenix Lander observations. It provided some images of what were claimed to be brines, the presence of which at its landing site was compatible with the atmospheric parameters and the composition of the soil observed. On the other hand, the so called Recurrent Slope Lineae (RSL) often imaged by orbiters, were considered as another clue pointing to the occurrence of the phenomenon, since it was thought that they might be caused by it. Now, Curiosity rover has performed the first in-situ multi-instrumental study on Mars’ surface, having collected the most comprehensive environmental data set ever taken by means of their instruments Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS), Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN), and Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM). REMS is providing continuous and accurate measurements of the relative humidity and surface and air temperatures among other parameters, and DAN and SAM provide the water content of the regolith and the atmosphere respectively. Analysis of these data has allowed to establish the existence of a present day active water cycle between the atmosphere and the regolith, that changes according to daily and seasonal cycles, and that is mediated by the presence of brines during certain periods of each and every day. Importantly, the study shows that the conditions for the occurrence of deliquescence are favourable even at equatorial latitudes where, at first, it was thought they were not due to the temperature and relative humidity conditions. This study provides new keys for the understanding of martian environment, and opens interesting lines of research and studies for future missions which may even have a bearing on extant microbial life.

  • 19.
    Castro, Juan Francisco Buenestado
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Mier, Maria-Paz Zorzano
    Centro de Astrobiologia, INTA-CSIC, Madrid.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Planetary exploration; Mars on the scope2015In: Journal of Astrobiology and Outreach, ISSN 2332-2519, Vol. 3, no 3, article id 133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article summarizes a practical case of introduction to research and planetary exploration through the analysis of data from the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS), one of the ten scientific instruments on board the Curiosity rover of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), currently operating at the impact crater Gale, on Mars. It is the main aim of this work to show how the data that are publicly available at the Planetary Data System (PDS) can be used to introduce undergraduate students and the general public into the subject of surface exploration and the environment of Mars. In particular, the goal of this practice was to investigate and quantify the heat flux between the rover spacecraft and the Martian surface, the role of the atmosphere in this interaction, and its dependence with seasons, as well as to estimate the thermal contamination of the Martian ground produced by the rover. The ground temperature sensor (GTS) of the REMS instrument has measured in-situ, for the first time ever, the diurnal and seasonal variation of the temperature of the surface on Mars along the rover traverse. This novel study shows that the rover radiative heat flux varies between 10 and 22 W/m2 during the Martian year, which is more than 10% of the solar daily averaged insolation at the top of the atmosphere. In addition, it is shown that the radiative heat flux from the rover to the ground varies with the atmospheric dust load, being the mean annual amplitude of the diurnal variation of the surface temperature of 76 K, as a result of solar heating during the day and infrared cooling during the night. As a remarkable and unexpected outcome, it has been established that the thermal contamination produced by the rover alone induces, on average, a systematic shift of 7.5 K, which is indeed about 10% of the one produced by solar heating. This result may have implications for the design and operation of future surface exploration probes such as InSight.

  • 20.
    Clarmann, T. Von
    et al.
    Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung Karlsruhe.
    Ceccherini, S.
    Istituto di Fisica Applicata “Nello Carrara,”, Florence.
    Doicu, A.
    Deutsches Zentrum für Luft-und Raumfahrt (DLR).
    Dudhia, A.
    Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics, Oxford University.
    Funke, B.
    Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía CSIC, Granada.
    Grabowski, U.
    Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung Karlsruhe.
    Hilgers, S.
    Deutsches Zentrum für Luft-und Raumfahrt (DLR).
    Jay, V.
    Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire.
    Linden, A.
    Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung Karlsruhe.
    López-Puertas, M.
    Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía CSIC, Granada.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung Karlsruhe, Analytical Services and Materials Inc., Hampton.
    Payne, V.
    Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics, Oxford University.
    Reburn, J.
    Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire.
    Ridolfi, M.
    Dipertemento di Chimica Fisica e Inorganica, Universitá di Bologna.
    Schreier, F.
    Deutsches Zentrum für Luft-und Raumfahrt (DLR).
    Schwarz, G.
    Deutsches Zentrum für Luft-und Raumfahrt (DLR).
    Siddans, R.
    Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire.
    Steck, T.
    Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung, Universität Karlsruhe.
    A blind test retrieval experiment for infrared limb emission spectrometry2003In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, ISSN 2169-897X, E-ISSN 2169-8996, Vol. 108, no D23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The functionality and characteristics of six different data processors (i.e., retrieval codes in their actual software and hardware environment) for analysis of high-resolution limb emission infrared spectra recorded by the space-borne Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) have been validated by means of a blind test retrieval experiment based on synthetic spectra. For this purpose a self-consistent set of atmospheric state parameters, including pressure, temperature, vibrational temperatures, and abundances of trace gases and aerosols, has been generated and used as input for radiative transfer calculations for MIPAS measurement geometry and configuration. These spectra were convolved with the MIPAS field of view, spectrally degraded by the MIPAS instrument line shape, and, finally, superimposed with synthetic measurement noise. These synthetic MIPAS measurements were distributed among the participants of the project “Advanced MIPAS level-2 data analysis” (AMIL2DA), who performed temperature and species abundance profile retrievals by inverse radiative transfer calculations. While the retrieved profiles of atmospheric state parameters reflect some characteristics of the individual data processors, it was shown that all the data processors under investigation are capable of producing reliable results in the sense that deviations of retrieved results from the reference profiles are within the margin that is consistent with analytical error estimation.

  • 21.
    Cockell, Charles S.
    et al.
    UK Centre for Astrobiology, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Midlothian, UK.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. UK Centre for Astrobiology, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Midlothian, UK; Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (UGR-CSIC), Granada, Spain .
    Zorzano, Maria-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Torrejon de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid, Spain.
    Bhardwaj, Anshuman
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Soria-Salinas, Álvaro
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Mathanla, Thasshwin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Israel Nazarious, Miracle
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Vakkada Ramachandran, Abhilash
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Suckling, Barbara
    Boulby Underground Laboratory, Boulby, UK.
    Subsurface scientific exploration of extraterrestrial environments (MINAR 5): analogue science, technology and education in the Boulby Mine, UK2019In: International Journal of Astrobiology, ISSN 1473-5504, E-ISSN 1475-3006, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 157-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The deep subsurface of other planetary bodies is of special interest for robotic and human exploration. The subsurface provides access to planetary interior processes, thus yielding insights into planetary formation and evolution. On Mars, the subsurface might harbour the most habitable conditions. In the context of human exploration, the subsurface can provide refugia for habitation from extreme surface conditions. We describe the fifth Mine Analogue Research (MINAR 5) programme at 1 km depth in the Boulby Mine, UK in collaboration with Spaceward Bound NASA and the Kalam Centre, India, to test instruments and methods for the robotic and human exploration of deep environments on the Moon and Mars. The geological context in Permian evaporites provides an analogue to evaporitic materials on other planetary bodies such as Mars. A wide range of sample acquisition instruments (NASA drills, Small Planetary Impulse Tool (SPLIT) robotic hammer, universal sampling bags), analytical instruments (Raman spectroscopy, Close-Up Imager, Minion DNA sequencing technology, methane stable isotope analysis, biomolecule and metabolic life detection instruments) and environmental monitoring equipment (passive air particle sampler, particle detectors and environmental monitoring equipment) was deployed in an integrated campaign. Investigations included studying the geochemical signatures of chloride and sulphate evaporitic minerals, testing methods for life detection and planetary protection around human-tended operations, and investigations on the radiation environment of the deep subsurface. The MINAR analogue activity occurs in an active mine, showing how the development of space exploration technology can be used to contribute to addressing immediate Earth-based challenges. During the campaign, in collaboration with European Space Agency (ESA), MINAR was used for astronaut familiarization with future exploration tools and techniques. The campaign was used to develop primary and secondary school and primary to secondary transition curriculum materials on-site during the campaign which was focused on a classroom extra vehicular activity simulation.

  • 22.
    Cockell, C.S.
    et al.
    UK Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh.
    Bush, T.
    UK Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh.
    Bryce, C.
    UK Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh.
    Direito, S.
    UK Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh.
    Fox-Powell, M.
    UK Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh.
    Harrison, J.P
    UK Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh.
    Lammer, H.
    Austrian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute, Graz.
    Landenmark, H.
    UK Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nicholson, N.
    UK Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh.
    Noack, L.
    Department of Reference Systems and Planetology, Royal Observatory of Belgium, Brussels.
    O'Malley-James, J.
    School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, St Andrews.
    Payler, S.J.
    UK Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh.
    Rushby, A.
    Centre for Ocean and Atmospheric Science (COAS), School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich.
    Samuels, T.
    UK Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh.
    Schwendner, P.
    UK Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh.
    Wadsworth, J.
    UK Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh.
    Mier, Maria-Paz Zorzano
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Habitability: a review2016In: Astrobiology, ISSN 1531-1074, E-ISSN 1557-8070, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 89-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Habitability is a widely used word in the geoscience, planetary science, and astrobiology literature, but what does it mean? In this review on habitability, we define it as the ability of an environment to support the activity of at least one known organism. We adopt a binary definition of “habitability” and a “habitable environment.” An environment either can or cannot sustain a given organism. However, environments such as entire planets might be capable of supporting more or less species diversity or biomass compared with that of Earth. A clarity in understanding habitability can be obtained by defining instantaneous habitability as the conditions at any given time in a given environment required to sustain the activity of at least one known organism, and continuous planetary habitability as the capacity of a planetary body to sustain habitable conditions on some areas of its surface or within its interior over geological timescales. We also distinguish between surface liquid water worlds (such as Earth) that can sustain liquid water on their surfaces and interior liquid water worlds, such as icy moons and terrestrial-type rocky planets with liquid water only in their interiors. This distinction is important since, while the former can potentially sustain habitable conditions for oxygenic photosynthesis that leads to the rise of atmospheric oxygen and potentially complex multicellularity and intelligence over geological timescales, the latter are unlikely to. Habitable environments do not need to contain life. Although the decoupling of habitability and the presence of life may be rare on Earth, it may be important for understanding the habitability of other planetary bodies

  • 23.
    Conrad, P.G.
    et al.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Eigenbrode, J.L.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Atreya, S.K.
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
    Blake, D.F.
    NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field.
    Coll, P.J.
    LISA, Université Paris-Est Créteil, Université Denis Diderot & CNRS Center, Créteil.
    Juarez, M. de la Torre
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
    Edgett, K.S.
    Malin Space Science Systems.
    Fairen, A.
    Cornell University, Ithaca.
    Fisk, M.R.
    Oregon State University, Corvallis.
    Franz, H.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Glavin, D.P.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Gómez, F.G.
    Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Madrid.
    Haberle, R. M.
    NASA Ames Research Center.
    Hamilton, V.E.
    Southwest Research Institute, Boulder.
    Leshin, L.A.
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra, Granada.
    Martinez-Frias, J.
    Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Madrid.
    McAdam, A.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    McKay, C.P.
    NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field.
    Ming, D.W.
    NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston.
    Navarro-Gonzalez, R.
    Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
    Pavlov, A.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Steele, A.
    Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC..
    Stern, J.C.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Zorzano, M.
    Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Madrid.
    Grotzinger, J.P.
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
    Environmental Dynamics and the Habitability Potential at Gale Crater, Mars2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The assessment of environmental habitability potential involves measurement of the chemical and physical attributes of the system as well as their dynamic interplay. The environmental dynamics describe the availability of both energy sources and raw materials for meeting the requirements of organisms and for altering the environment. Energetic exchange can also determine the preservation potential for organic materials in the rock record. During its first year at Gale Crater, the Mars Science Laboratory payload has directly measured the chemistry and physical attributes, e.g., temperature, humidity, radiation, pressure, etc. of the martian atmosphere. Curiosity has also acquired chemical and mineralogical data, both from a wind drift deposit of fines and from two examples of a sedimentary rock formation in a region of Gale Crater called Yellowknife Bay, some 445 meters to the east of Bradbury Landing, where Curiosity initially touched down. These data enabled inferences to be made regarding depositional environment and past habitability potential at Gale Crater. The rock chemistry data reveal signs of aqueous interaction i.e., H2O, OH and H2 and sufficient elemental basis (C, H, O, S and possibly N) for plausible nutrient supply, should Mars have ever had autotrophic prokaryotes to exploit it, and a range of redox conditions tolerable to Earth microbes is indicated by the presence of clay minerals. Curiosity’s observations of the chemical, physical and geologic features of Yellowknife Bay point to a formerly habitable environment.

  • 24.
    Cousin, A.
    et al.
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Meslin, P.Y.
    Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse.
    Wiens, R.C.
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Rapin, W.
    Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse.
    Mangold, N.
    Laboratoire Planétologie et Géodynamique, LPGNantes, CNRS UMR 6112, Université de Nantes.
    Fabre, C.
    Université de Lorraine, Nancy.
    Gasnault, O.
    Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse.
    Forni, O.
    Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse.
    Tokar, R.
    Planetary Science Institute, Tucson.
    Ollila, A.
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.
    Schröder, S.
    Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse.
    Lasue, J.
    Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse.
    Maurice, S.
    Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse.
    Sautter, V.
    Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle, Paris.
    Newsom, H.
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.
    Vaniman, D.
    Planetary Science Institute, Tucson.
    Mouélic, S. Le
    Laboratoire Planétologie et Géodynamique, LPGNantes, CNRS UMR 6112, Université de Nantes.
    Dyar, D.
    Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley.
    Berger, G.
    Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse.
    Blaney, D.
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
    Nachon, M.
    Laboratoire Planétologie et Géodynamique, LPGNantes, CNRS UMR 6112, Université de Nantes.
    Dromart, G.
    Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon.
    Lanza, N.
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Clark, B.
    Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colorado.
    Clegg, S.
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Delapp, D.
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Compositions of coarse and fine particles in martian soils at gale: A window into the production of soils2015In: Icarus (New York, N.Y. 1962), ISSN 0019-1035, E-ISSN 1090-2643, Vol. 249, p. 22-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ChemCam instrument onboard the Curiosity rover provides for the first time an opportunity to study martian soils at a sub-millimeter resolution. In this work, we analyzed 24 soil targets probed by ChemCam during the first 250 sols on Mars. Using the depth profile capability of the ChemCam LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) technique, we found that 45% of the soils contained coarse grains (>500 μm). Three distinct clusters have been detected: Cluster 1 shows a low SiO2 content; Cluster 2 corresponds to coarse grains with a felsic composition, whereas Cluster 3 presents a typical basaltic composition. Coarse grains from Cluster 2 have been mostly observed exposed in the vicinity of the landing site, whereas coarse grains from Clusters 1 and 3 have been detected mostly buried, and were found all along the rover traverse. The possible origin of these coarse grains was investigated. Felsic (Cluster 2) coarse grains have the same origin as the felsic rocks encountered near the landing site, whereas the origin of the coarse grains from Clusters 1 and 3 seems to be more global. Fine-grained soils (particle size < laser beam diameter which is between 300 and 500 μm) show a homogeneous composition all along the traverse, different from the composition of the rocks encountered at Gale. Although they contain a certain amount of hydrated amorphous component depleted in SiO2, possibly present as a surface coating, their overall chemical homogeneity and their close-to-basaltic composition suggest limited, or isochemical alteration, and a limited interaction with liquid water. Fine particles and coarse grains from Cluster 1 have a similar composition, and the former could derive from weathering of the latter. Overall martian soils have a bulk composition between that of fine particles and coarse grains. This work shows that the ChemCam instrument provides a means to study the variability of soil composition at a scale not achievable by bulk chemical analyses.

  • 25.
    Delgado-Bonal, A.
    et al.
    Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR).
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Human vision is determined based on information theory2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 36038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is commonly accepted that the evolution of the human eye has been driven by the maximum intensity of the radiation emitted by the Sun. However, the interpretation of the surrounding environment is constrained not only by the amount of energy received but also by the information content of the radiation. Information is related to entropy rather than energy. The human brain follows Bayesian statistical inference for the interpretation of visual space. The maximization of information occurs in the process of maximizing the entropy. Here, we show that the photopic and scotopic vision absorption peaks in humans are determined not only by the intensity but also by the entropy of radiation. We suggest that through the course of evolution, the human eye has not adapted only to the maximum intensity or to the maximum information but to the optimal wavelength for obtaining information. On Earth, the optimal wavelengths for photopic and scotopic vision are 555 nm and 508 nm, respectively, as inferred experimentally. These optimal wavelengths are determined by the temperature of the star (in this case, the Sun) and by the atmospheric composition.

  • 26.
    Delgado-Bonal, Alfonso
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Evaluation of the Atmospheric Chemical Entropy Production of Mars2015In: Entropy, ISSN 1099-4300, E-ISSN 1099-4300, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 5047-5062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermodynamic disequilibrium is a necessary situation in a system in which complex emergent structures are created and maintained. It is known that most of the chemical disequilibrium, a particular type of thermodynamic disequilibrium, in Earth's atmosphere is a consequence of life. We have developed a thermochemical model for the Martian atmosphere to analyze the disequilibrium by chemical reactions calculating the entropy production. It follows from the comparison with the Earth atmosphere that the magnitude of the entropy produced by the recombination reaction forming O 3 (O + O 2 + CO 2 O 3 + CO 2) in the atmosphere of the Earth is larger than the entropy produced by the dominant set of chemical reactions considered for Mars, as a consequence of the low density and the poor variety of species of the Martian atmosphere. If disequilibrium is needed to create and maintain self-organizing structures in a system, we conclude that the current Martian atmosphere is unable to support large physico-chemical structures, such as those created on Earth.

  • 27.
    Delgado-Bonal, Alfonso
    et al.
    Centro de Astrobiologia, INTA-CSIC, Madrid.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Solar cell temperature on Mars2015In: Solar Energy, ISSN 0038-092X, E-ISSN 1471-1257, Vol. 118, p. 74-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The operating temperature of a solar cell determines its efficiency and performance. This temperature depends on the materials used to build the cell but also on the environmental variables surrounding it (i.e., radiation, ambient temperature, wind speed and humidity). Several equations have been proposed to calculate this temperature, depending on these variables. Also, for Earth conditions, simplifiedequations have been developed, but are not valid for other planets, as Mars, where the environmental conditions are extremely different.In this paper, we develop a simplified equation to calculate the temperature of a solar cell under Mars environmental conditions and discuss the effect that altitude and wind on Mars might have on the solar cell temperature. The correct determination of the operating temperature of the cell will help to optimize the design of the next solar cell powered rovers for the exploration of Mars.

  • 28.
    Delgado-Bonal, Alfonso
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martín, Sandra Vázquez
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Mier, Maria-Paz Zorzano
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Solar and wind exergy potentials for Mars2016In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 102, p. 550-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The energy requirements of the planetary exploration spacecrafts constrain the lifetime of the missions, their mobility and capabilities, and the number of instruments onboard. They are limiting factors in planetary exploration. Several missions to the surface of Mars have proven the feasibility and success of solar panels as energy source. The analysis of the exergy efficiency of the solar radiation has been carried out successfully on Earth, however, to date, there is not an extensive research regarding the thermodynamic exergy efficiency of in-situ renewable energy sources on Mars. In this paper, we analyse the obtainable energy (exergy) from solar radiation under Martian conditions. For this analysis we have used the surface environmental variables on Mars measured in-situ by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station onboard the Curiosity rover and from satellite by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer instrument onboard the Mars Global Surveyor satellite mission. We evaluate the exergy efficiency from solar radiation on a global spatial scale using orbital data for a Martian year; and in a one single location in Mars (the Gale crater) but with an appreciable temporal resolution (1 h). Also, we analyse the wind energy as an alternative source of energy for Mars exploration and compare the results with those obtained on Earth. We study the viability of solar and wind energy station for the future exploration of Mars, showing that a small square solar cell of 0.30 m length could maintain a meteorological station on Mars. We conclude that the low density of the atmosphere of Mars is responsible of the low thermal exergy efficiency of solar panels. It also makes the use of wind energy uneffective. Finally, we provide insights for the development of new solar cells on Mars.

  • 29.
    Delgado-Bonal, Alfonso
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Mier, Maria-Paz Zorzano
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martian Top of the Atmosphere 10–420 nm spectral irradiance database and forecast for solar cycle 242016In: Solar Energy, ISSN 0038-092X, E-ISSN 1471-1257, Vol. 134, p. 228-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultraviolet radiation from 10 to 420 nm reaching Mars Top of the Atmosphere (TOA) and surface is important in a wide variety of fields such as space exploration, climate modeling, and spacecraft design, as it has impact in the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere and soil. Despite the existence of databases for UV radiation reaching Earth TOA, based in space-borne instrumentation orbiting our planet, there is no similar information for Mars. Here we present a Mars TOA UV spectral irradiance database for solar cycle 24 (years 2008–2019), containing daily values from 10 to 420 nm. The values in this database have been computed using a model that is fed by the Earth-orbiting Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) data. As the radiation coming from the Sun is not completely isotropic, in order to eliminate the geometrically related features but being able to capture the general characteristics of the solar cycle stage, we provide 3-, 7- and 15-days averaged values at each wavelength. Our database is of interest for atmospheric modeling and spectrally dependent experiments on Mars, the analysis of current and upcoming surface missions (rovers and landers) and orbiters in Mars. Daily values for the TOA UV conditions at the rover Curiosity location, as well as for the NASA Insight mission in 2016, and ESA/Russia ExoMars mission in 2018 are provided.

  • 30.
    Dirri, Fabrizio
    et al.
    IAPS-INAF, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100 Rome, 00133, Italy.
    Palomba, Ernesto
    IAPS-INAF, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100 Rome, 00133, Italy.
    Longobardo, Andrea
    IAPS-INAF, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100 Rome, 00133, Italy.
    Biondi, David
    IAPS-INAF, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100 Rome, 00133, Italy.
    Boccaccini, Angelo
    IAPS-INAF, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100 Rome, 00133, Italy.
    Galiano, Anna
    IAPS-INAF, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100 Rome, 00133, Italy.
    Zampetti, Emiliano
    IIA-CNR, via Salaria km 29,300 Monterotondo Rome, Italy.
    Saggin, Bortolino
    Politecnico di Milano, Polo Territoriale di Lecco Lecco, Italy.
    Scaccabarozzi, Diego
    Politecnico di Milano, Polo Territoriale di Lecco Lecco, Italy.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    VISTA instrument: a PCM-based sensor for organics and volatiles characterization by using Thermogravimetric technique2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    VISTA (Volatile In Situ Thermogravimetry Analyser) is a µ-Thermogravimeter sensor developed by Consortium of Italian Institutes. ThermoGravimetric Analysis (TGA) is a widely used technique to monitor thermal processes involving volatile compounds, e.g. deposition/sublimation and absorption/ desorption. The instrument core is composed by a Piezoelectric Crystal Microbalance (PCM), equipped with built-in heater and built-in temperature sensor, and provided of its own Proximity Electronics (PE). The PCM oscillation frequency linearly depends on the mass deposited on its sensible area (according to Sauerbrey equation) while the PCM temperature can be increased by means of integrated heaters. Thus, mass and volatile composition can be inferred by the frequency change and by desorption temperature, respectively. The instrument is divided in two sensor heads: VISTA1, able to monitor outgassing processes in space, and VISTA2, able to reach higher temperatures, studying the dehydration and organics decomposition in minerals in different environmental conditions. An Engineering Model of VISTA1 and a laboratory breadboard of VISTA2 have been developed. Pure organic compounds and contaminant have been characterized by using deposition processes and TGA cycles obtaining some physical-chemical parameters, i.e. enthalpy of sublimation/evaporation, ΔHHsub,evap , deposition rates, kk and vapor pressures, Pvap . The instrument concept, the scientific objectives and the laboratory measurements are explained in this work.

  • 31.
    Downs, R.T.
    et al.
    University of Arizona, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Department of Geology, University of Arizona, Tucson.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Determining Mineralogy on Mars with the CheMin X-Ray Diffractometer2015In: Elements, ISSN 1811-5209, E-ISSN 1811-5217, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 45-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rover Curiosity is conducting X-ray diffraction experiments on the surface of Mars using the CheMin instrument. The analyses enable identification of the major and minor minerals, providing insight into the conditions under which the samples were formed or altered and, in turn, into past habitable environments on Mars. The CheMin instrument was developed over a twenty-year period, mainly through the efforts of scientists and engineers from NASA and DOE. Results from the first four experiments, at the Rocknest, John Klein, Cumberland, and Windjana sites, have been received and interpreted. The observed mineral assemblages are consistent with an environment hospitable to Earth-like life, if it existed on Mars.

  • 32.
    Echle, Georg
    et al.
    Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung Karlsruhe.
    Clarmann, Thomas von
    Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung Karlsruhe.
    Dudhia, Anu
    Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics, Oxford University.
    Flaud, Jean-Marie
    Laboratoire de Photophysique Moléculaire, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, Orsay.
    Funke, Bernd
    Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung Karlsruhe.
    Glatthor, Norbert
    Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung Karlsruhe.
    Kerridge, Brian
    Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire.
    López-Puertas, Manuel
    Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía CSIC, Granada.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung Karlsruhe.
    Stiller, Gabriele P.
    Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung Karlsruhe.
    Optimized spectral microwindows for data analysis of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding on the Environmental Satellite2000In: Applied Optics, ISSN 1559-128X, E-ISSN 2155-3165, Vol. 39, no 30, p. 5531-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For data analysis of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) atmospheric limb emission spectroscopic experiment on Environmental Satellite microwindows, i.e., small spectral regions for data analysis, have been defined and optimized. A novel optimization scheme has been developed for this purpose that adjusts microwindow boundaries such that the total retrieval error with respect to measurement noise, parameter uncertainties, and systematic errors is minimized. Dedicated databases that contain optimized microwindows for retrieval of vertical profiles of pressure and temperature, H2O, O3, HNO3, CH4, N2O, and NO2 have been generated. Furthermore, a tool for optimal selection of subsets of predefined microwindows for specific retrieval situations has been provided. This tool can be used further for estimating total retrieval errors for a selected microwindow subset. It has been shown by use of this tool that an altitude-dependent definition of microwindows is superior to an altitude-independent definition. For computational efficiency a dedicated microwindow-related list of spectral lines has been defined that contains only those spectral lines that are of relevance for MIPAS limb sounding observations.

  • 33.
    Ekman, Jonas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Antti, Marta-Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Emami, Reza
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Kuhn, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Minami, Ichiro
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Gustafsson, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Zorzano Mier, María-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Milz, Mathias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Grahn, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Behar, Etienne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering.
    Wolf, Veronika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Dordlofva, Christo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Mendaza de Cal, Maria Teresa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Jamali, Maryam
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Roos, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Ottemark, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nieto, Chris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Soria Salinas, Álvaro Tomás
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Vázquez Martín, Sandra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nyberg, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Neikter, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Lindwall, Angelica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Fakhardji, Wissam
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Projekt: Rymdforskarskolan2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The Graduate School of Space Technology

  • 34.
    Escamilla-Roa, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR).
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR).
    Sainz-Díaz, C. Ignacio
    Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR).
    Adsorption of methane and CO2 onto olivine surfaces in Martian dust conditions2018In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 153, p. 163-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methane has been detected on all planets of our Solar System, and most of the larger moons, as well as in dwarf-planets like Pluto and Eric. The presence of this molecule in rocky planets is very interesting because its presence in the Earth's atmosphere is mainly related to biotic processes. Space instrumentation in orbiters around Mars has detected olivine on the Martian soil and dust. On the other hand the measurements of methane from the Curiosity rover report detection of background levels of atmospheric methane with abundance that is lower than model estimates of ultraviolet degradation of accreted interplanetary dust particles or carbonaceous chondrite material. Additionally, elevated levels of methane about this background have been observed implying that Mars is episodically producing methane from an additional unknown source, making the reasons of these temporal fluctuations of methane a hot topic in planetary research. The goal of this study is to investigate at atomic level the interactions during the adsorption processes of methane and other Mars atmospheric species (CO2, H2O) on forsterite surfaces, through electronic structure calculations based on the Density Functional Theory (DFT). We propose two models to simulate the interaction of adsorbates with the surface of dust mineral, such as binary mixtures (5CH4+5H2O/5CH4+5CO2) and as a semi-clathrate adsorption. We have obtained interesting results of the adsorption process in the mixture 5CH4+5CO2. Associative and dissociative adsorptions were observed for water and CO2 molecules. The methane molecules were only trapped and held by water or CO2 molecules. In the dipolar surface, the adsorption of CO2 molecules produced new species: one CO from a CO2 dissociation, and, two CO2 molecules chemisorbed to mineral surface forming a carbonate group. Our results suggest that CO2 has a strong interaction with the mineral surface when methane is present. These results could be confirmed after the analysis of the data from the upcoming remote and in-situ observations on Mars, as those to be performed by instruments on the ESA's ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter and ExoMars rover.

  • 35.
    Farley, K.A.
    et al.
    Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology.
    Malespin, C.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Mahaffy, P.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Grotzinger, J.P.
    Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology.
    Vasconcelos, P.M.
    School of Earth Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane.
    Milliken, R.E.
    Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Providence.
    Malin, M.
    Malin Space Science Systems.
    Edgett, K.S.
    Malin Space Science Systems.
    Pavlov, A.A.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Hurowitz, J.A.
    Department of Geosciences, Stony Brook University.
    Grant, J.A.
    Center for Earth and Planetary Studies, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Washington.
    Miller, H.B.
    Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology.
    Arvidson, R.
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis.
    Beegle, L.
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
    Calef, F.
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
    Conrad, P.G.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Dietrich, W.E.
    Earth and Planetary Science Department, University of California, Berkeley.
    Eigenbrode, J.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Gellert, R.
    Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Ontario.
    Gupta, S.
    Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London.
    Hamilton, V.
    Southwest Research Institute, Boulder.
    Hassler, D.M.
    Southwest Research Institute, Boulder.
    Lewis, K.W.
    Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, New Jersey.
    McLennan, S.M.
    Department of Geosciences, Stony Brook University.
    Ming, D.
    NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston.
    Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.F.
    University of Kiel.
    In situ radiometric and exposure age dating of the martian surface2014In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 343, no 6169, article id 1247166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We determined radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases in a mudstone on the floor of Gale Crater. A K-Ar age of 4.21 ± 0.35 billion years represents a mixture of detrital and authigenic components and confirms the expected antiquity of rocks comprising the crater rim. Cosmic-ray-produced 3He, 21Ne, and 36Ar yield concordant surface exposure ages of 78 ± 30 million years. Surface exposure occurred mainly in the present geomorphic setting rather than during primary erosion and transport. Our observations are consistent with mudstone deposition shortly after the Gale impact or possibly in a later event of rapid erosion and deposition. The mudstone remained buried until recent exposure by wind-driven scarp retreat. Sedimentary rocks exposed by this mechanism may thus offer the best potential for organic biomarker preservation against destruction by cosmic radiation.

  • 36.
    Fonseca, Ricardo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR), Granada.
    Andersson, Kent
    Swedish Space Corporation, Esrange Space Center, Kiruna.
    Wind Forecasts for Rocket and Balloon Launches at the Esrange Space Center Using the WRF Model2018In: Weather and forecasting, ISSN 0882-8156, E-ISSN 1520-0434, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 813-833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-altitude balloons and rockets are regularly launched at the Esrange Space Center (ESC) in Kiruna, Sweden, with the aim of retrieving atmospheric data for meteorological and space studies in the Arctic region. Meteorological conditions, particularly wind direction and speed, play a critical role in the decision of whether to go ahead with or postpone a planned launch. Given the lack of high-resolution wind forecasts for this remote region, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model is used to downscale short-term forecasts given by the Global Forecast System (GFS) for the ESC for six 5-day periods in the warm, cold, and transition seasons. Three planetary boundary layer (PBL) schemes are considered: the local Mellor-Yamada-Janjic' (MYJ), the nonlocal Yonsei University (YSU), and the hybrid local-nonlocal Asymmetric Convective Model 2 (ACM2). The ACM2 scheme is found to provide the most skillful forecasts. An analysis of the WRF Model output against the launch criteria for two of the most commonly launched vehicles, the sounding rockets Veículo de Sondagem Booster-30 (VSB-30) and Improved Orion, reveals probability of detection (POD) values that always exceeds 60% with the false alarm rate (FAR) generally below 50%. It is concluded that the WRF Model, in its present configuration, can be used to generate useful 5-day wind forecasts for the launches of these two rockets. The conclusions reached here are applicable to similar sites in the Arctic and Antarctic regions.

  • 37.
    Fonseca, Ricardo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martín-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR), 18100 Granada, Spain.
    High-Resolution Dynamical Downscaling of Re-Analysis Data over the Kerguelen Islands using the WRF Model2019In: Journal of Theoretical and Applied Climatology, ISSN 0177-798X, E-ISSN 1434-4483, Vol. 135, no 3-4, p. 1259-1277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have used the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to simulate the climate of the Kerguelen Islands (49° S, 69° E) and investigate its inter-annual variability. Here, we have dynamically downscaled 30 years of the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) over these islands at 3-km horizontal resolution. The model output is found to agree well with the station and radiosonde data at the Port-aux-Français station, the only location in the islands for which observational data is available. An analysis of the seasonal mean WRF data showed a general increase in precipitation and decrease in temperature with elevation. The largest seasonal rainfall amounts occur at the highest elevations of the Cook Ice Cap in winter where the summer mean temperature is around 0 °C. Five modes of variability are considered: conventional and Modoki El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), Subtropical IOD (SIOD) and Southern Annular Mode (SAM). It is concluded that a key mechanism by which these modes impact the local climate is through interaction with the diurnal cycle in particular in the summer season when it has a larger magnitude. One of the most affected regions is the area just to the east of the Cook Ice Cap extending into the lower elevations between the Gallieni and Courbet Peninsulas. The WRF simulation shows that despite the small annual variability, the atmospheric flow in the Kerguelen Islands is rather complex which may also be the case for the other islands located in the Southern Hemisphere at similar latitudes.

  • 38.
    Fonseca, Ricardo Morais
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Zorzano Mier, María-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    MARSWRF Prediction of Entry Descent Landing Profiles: Applications to Mars Exploration2019In: Earth and Space Science, E-ISSN 2333-5084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we use the Mars implementation of the Planet Weather Research and Forecasting model, MarsWRF, to simulate the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) vertical profiles from six past missions: Pathfinder, Mars Exploration Rovers Opportunity and SpiritPhoenix, Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover and ExoMars 2016 (Schiaparelli), and compare the results with observed data. In order to investigate the sensitivity of the model predictions to the atmospheric dust distribution, MarsWRF is run with two prescribed dust scenarios. It is concluded that the MarsWRF EDL predictions can be used for guidance into the design and planning stage of future missions to the planet, as it generally captures the observed EDL profiles, although it has a tendency to underestimate the temperature and overestimate the density for heights above 15 km. This could be attributed to an incorrect representation of the observed dust loading. We have used the model to predict the EDL conditions that may be encountered by two future missions: ExoMars 2020 and Mars 2020. When run for Oxia Planum and Jezero Crater for the expected landing time, MarsWRF predicts a large sensitivity to the dust loading in particular for the horizontal wind speed above 10‐15 km with maximum differences of up to ±30 m s‐1 for the former and ±15 m s‐1 for the latter site. For both sites, the best time for EDL, i.e. when the wind speed is generally the weakest with smaller shifts in direction, is predicted to be in the late morning and early afternoon.

  • 39.
    Fonseca, Ricardo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Zorzano Mier, María-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Centro de Astrobiología (INTA-CSIC), Madrid, Spain.
    Azu-Bustos, Armando
    Centro de Astrobiología (INTA-CSIC), Madrid, Spain. Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Autónoma de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
    González-Silva, Carlos
    Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Tarapacá, Iquique, Chile.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (UGR-CSIC), Granada, Spain.
    A surface temperature and moisture intercomparison study of the Weather Research and Forecasting model, in‐situ measurements and satellite observations over the Atacama Desert2019In: Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, ISSN 0035-9009, E-ISSN 1477-870X, Vol. 145, no 722, p. 2202-2220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Good knowledge of the environmental conditions of deserts on Earth is relevant forclimate studies. The Atacama Desert is of particular interest as it is considered tobe the driest region on Earth. We have performed simulations using the WeatherResearch and Forecasting (WRF) model over the Atacama Desert for two week-longperiods in the austral winter season coincident with surface temperature and relativehumidity in-situ observations at three sites. We found that the WRF model generallyoverestimates the daytime surface temperature, with biases of up to 11◦C, despitegiving a good simulation of the relative humidity. In order to improve the agree-ment with observed measurements, we conducted sensitivity experiments in whichthe surface albedo, soil moisture content and five tuneable parameters in the NoahLand Surface Model (namely soil porosity, soil suction, saturated soil hydraulic con-ductivity, thebparameter used in hydraulic functions and the quartz fraction) areperturbed. We concluded that an accurate simulation is not possible, most likelybecause the Noah Land Surface Model does not have a groundwater table that maybe shallow in desert regions. The WRF-predicted land surface temperature is alsoevaluated against that estimated from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrora-diometer (MODIS) instrument. While at night the satellite-derived and ground-basedmeasurements are generally in agreement, during the day MODIS estimates aretypically lower by as much as 17◦C. This is attributed to the large uncertainty inthe MODIS-estimated land surface temperatures in arid and semi-arid regions. Thefindings of this work highlight the need for ground-based observational networksin remote regions such as the Atacama Desert where satellite-derived and modelproducts may not be very accurate.

  • 40.
    Fonseca, Ricardo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Zorzano Mier, María-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Centro de Astrobiología (INTA-CSIC).
    Martín-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR).
    Planetary Boundary Layer and Circulation Dynamics at Gale Crater, Mars2018In: Icarus (New York, N.Y. 1962), ISSN 0019-1035, E-ISSN 1090-2643, Vol. 302, p. 537-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mars implementation of the Planet Weather Research and Forecasting (PlanetWRF) model, MarsWRF, is used here to simulate the atmospheric conditions at Gale Crater for different seasons during a period coincident with the Curiosity rover operations. The model is first evaluated with the existing single-point observations from the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS), and is then used to provide a larger scale interpretation of these unique measurements as well as to give complementary information where there are gaps in the measurements.

    The variability of the planetary boundary layer depth may be a driver of the changes in the local dust and trace gas content within the crater. Our results show that the average time when the PBL height is deeper than the crater rim increases and decreases with the same rate and pattern as Curiosity's observations of the line-of-sight of dust within the crater and that the season when maximal (minimal) mixing is produced is Ls 225°-315° (Ls 90°-110°). Thus the diurnal and seasonal variability of the PBL depth seems to be the driver of the changes in the local dust content within the crater. A comparison with the available methane measurements suggests that changes in the PBL depth may also be one of the factors that accounts for the observed variability, with the model results pointing towards a local source to the north of the MSL site.

    The interaction between regional and local flows at Gale crater is also investigated assuming that the meridional wind, the dynamically important component of the horizontal wind at Gale, anomalies with respect to the daily mean can be approximated by a sinusoidal function as they typically oscillate between positive (south to north) and negative (north to south) values that correspond to upslope/downslope or downslope/upslope regimes along the crater rim and Mount Sharp slopes and the dichotomy boundary. The smallest magnitudes are found in the northern crater floor in a region that comprises Bradbury Landing, in particular at Ls 90° when they are less than 1 m s−1, indicating very little lateral mixing with outside air. The largest amplitudes occur in the south-western portions of the crater where they can exceed 20 m s−1. Should the slope flows along the crater rims interact with the dichotomy boundary flow, which is more likely at Ls 270° and very unlikely at Ls 90°, they are likely to interact constructively for a few hours from late evening to nighttime (∼17-23 LMST) and from pre-dawn early morning (∼5-11 LMST) hours at the norther crater rim and destructively at night (∼22-23 LMST) and in the morning (∼10-11 LMST) at the southern crater rim.

    We conclude that a better understanding of the PBL and circulation dynamics has important implications for the variability of the concentration of dust, non-condensable and trace gases at the bottom of other craters on Mars as mixing with outside air can be achieved vertically, through changes in the PBL depth, and laterally, by the transport of air into and out of the crater.

  • 41.
    Freissinet, C.
    et al.
    Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Glavin, D.P.
    Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Mahaffy, P.R.
    Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Miller, K.E.
    Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge.
    Eigenbrode, J.L.
    Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Summons, R.E.
    Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge.
    Brunner, A.E.
    Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Buch, A.
    Laboratoire de Génie des Procédés et les Matériaux, Ecole Centrale Paris.
    Szopa, C.
    Laboratoire Atmosphères, Milieux, Observations Spatiales, Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Univ. Versailles Saint-Quentin & CNRS, Paris.
    Archer Jr., P.D.
    Jacobs Technology, NASA Johnson Space Center.
    Franz, H.B.
    Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Atreya, S.K.
    Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
    Brinckerhoff, E.B.
    Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Cabane, M.
    Laboratoire Atmosphères, Milieux, Observations Spatiales, Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Univ. Versailles Saint-Quentin & CNRS, Paris.
    Coll, P.
    Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, Université Paris-Est Créteil, Univ. Paris Diderot and CNRS.
    Conrad, P.G.
    Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Marais, D.J. Des
    Exobiology Branch, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Kalifornien.
    Dworkin, J.P.
    Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Fairén, A.G.
    Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.
    François, P.
    Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
    Grotzinger, J.P.
    Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology.
    Kashyap, S.
    Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Kate, I.L. ten
    Earth Sciences Department, Utrecht University.
    Leshin, L.A.
    Department of Earth and Environmental Science and School of Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York.
    Malespin, C.A.
    Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Zorzano, María-Paz
    Centro de Astrobiologia, INTA-CSIC, Madrid.
    Organic molecules in the Sheepbed Mudstone, Gale Crater, Mars2015In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets, ISSN 2169-9097, E-ISSN 2169-9100, Vol. 120, no 3, p. 495-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument [Mahaffy et al., 2012] onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover is designed to conduct inorganic and organic chemical analyses of the atmosphere and the surface regolith and rocks to help evaluate the past and present habitability potential of Mars at Gale Crater [Grotzinger et al., 2012]. Central to this task is the development of an inventory of any organic molecules present to elucidate processes associated with their origin, diagenesis, concentration and long-term preservation. This will guide the future search for biosignatures [Summons et al., 2011]. Here we report the definitive identification of chlorobenzene (150–300 parts per billion by weight (ppbw)) and C2 to C4 dichloroalkanes (up to 70 ppbw) with the SAM gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS), and detection of chlorobenzene in the direct evolved gas analysis (EGA) mode, in multiple portions of the fines from the Cumberland drill hole in the Sheepbed mudstone at Yellowknife Bay. When combined with GCMS and EGA data from multiple scooped and drilled samples, blank runs and supporting laboratory analog studies, the elevated levels of chlorobenzene and the dichloroalkanes cannot be solely explained by instrument background sources known to be present in SAM. We conclude that these chlorinated hydrocarbons are the reaction products of martian chlorine and organic carbon derived from martian sources (e.g. igneous, hydrothermal, atmospheric, or biological) or exogenous sources such as meteorites, comets or interplanetary dust particles.

  • 42.
    Freissinet, Caroline
    et al.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    McAdam, Amy
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Archer, Doug
    NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston.
    Buch, Arnaud
    Ecole Centrale Paris, Chatenay-Malabry.
    Eigenbrode, Jen
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Franz, Heather
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Glavin, Daniel
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Ming, Doug
    NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston.
    Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael
    Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
    Steele, Andrew
    Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC..
    Stern, Jen
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Mahaffy, Paul
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Madrid.
    Detection of reduced sulfur and other S-bearing species evolved from Rocknest sample in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Funke, Bernd
    et al.
    Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía CSIC, Granada.
    López-Puertas, M.
    Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía CSIC, Granada.
    Stiller, G.
    Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía CSIC, Granada.
    Clarmann, T. Von
    Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía CSIC, Granada.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía CSIC, Granada.
    New non-LTE retrieval method for atmospheric parameters from MIPAS/ENVISAT emission spectra at 5.3 μm2002In: Proceedings of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering, ISSN 0277-786X, E-ISSN 1996-756X, Vol. 4539, p. 396-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atmospheric emissions at 5.3 μm will be measured by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS), a high-resolution limb sounder on board the European polar platform ENVISAT, scheduled to be launched in 2001. Measured spectra at 5.3 μm contain information on important atmospheric quantities such as NO volume mixing ratio, thermospheric temperature, and chemical NO production rates. However, the scientific analysis of this spectral region has to deal with complex non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) effects. A conventional non-LTE retrieval approach using ab initio vibrational temperatures cannot be applied due to rotational and spin-orbit non-LTE of NO in the thermosphere, and the dependence of NO state populations on the NO abundance itself caused by chemical excitations. An innovative non-LTE retrieval method enabling the treatment of vibrational, rotational, and spin non-LTE as well as a dependence of the non-LTE state distribution on the retrieval target quantities has thus been developed for the MIPAS data analysis. The ability of the developed non-LTE inversion tool to retrieve NO abundance profiles, thermospheric temperature profiles, and NO mean production rates by NO2 photolysis in the stratosphere and N+O2 combination in the thermosphere is demonstrated by means of a feasibility study.

  • 44.
    Gardner, J.L.
    et al.
    Stewart Radiance Laboratory, Bedford.
    Funke, B.
    Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía CSIC, Granada.
    Mlynczak, M.G.
    Science Directorate, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton.
    López-Puertas, M.
    Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía CSIC, Granada.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Analytical Services and Materials Inc., Hampton.
    III, J.M. Russell
    Center for Atmospheric Sciences, Hampton University.
    Miller, S.M.
    Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts.
    Sharma, R.D.
    Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts.
    Winick, J.R.
    Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts.
    Comparison of nighttime nitric oxide 5.3 μm emissions in the thermosphere measured by MIPAS and SABER2007In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 112, no A10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comparative study of nitric oxide (NO) 5.3 μm emissions in the thermosphere measured by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) spectrometer and the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) radiometer satellite instruments was conducted for nighttime data collected on 14 June 2003. The agreement between the data sets was very good, within ∼25% over the entire latitude range studied from −58° to + 4°. The MIPAS and SABER data were inverted to retrieve NO volume emission rates. Spectral fitting of the MIPAS data was used to determine the NO(v = 1) rotational and spin-orbit temperatures, which were found to be in nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) above 110 km. Near 110 km the rotational and spin-orbit temperatures converged, indicating the onset of equilibrium in agreement with the results of non-LTE modeling. Because of the onset of equilibrium the NO rotational and spin-orbit temperatures can be used to estimate the kinetic temperature near 110 km. The results indicate that the atmospheric model NRLMSISE-00 underestimates the kinetic temperature near 110 km for the locations investigated. The SABER instrument 5.3 μm band filter cuts off a significant fraction of the NO(Δv = 1) band, and therefore modeling of NO is necessary to predict the total band radiance. The needed correction factors were directly determined from the MIPAS data, providing validation of the modeled values used in SABER operational data processing. The correction factors were applied to the SABER data to calculate densities of NO(v = 1). A feasibility study was also conducted to investigate the use of NO 5.3 μm emission data to derive NO(v = 0) densities in the thermosphere.

  • 45.
    Gellert, Uwe
    et al.
    Universität Hamburg, Freie Universität Berlin.
    III, Benton Clark
    Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colorado.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    In Situ Compositional Measurements of Rocks and Soils with the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer on NASA's Mars Rovers2015In: Elements, ISSN 1811-5209, E-ISSN 1811-5217, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 39-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is a soda can–sized, arm-mounted instrument that measures the chemical composition of rocks and soils using X-ray spectroscopy. It has been part of the science payload of the four rovers that NASA has landed on Mars. It uses 244Cm sources for a combination of PIXE and XRF to quantify 16 elements. So far, about 700 Martian samples from about 50 km of combined traverses at the four landing sites have been documented. The compositions encountered range from unaltered basaltic rocks and extensive salty sandstones to nearly pure hydrated ferric sulfates and silica-rich subsurface soils. The APXS is used for geochemical reconnaissance, identification of rock and soil types, and sample triage. It provides crucial constraints for use with the mineralogical instruments. The APXS data set allows the four landing sites to be compared with each other and with Martian meteorites, and it provides ground truth measurements for comparison with orbital observations.

  • 46.
    Goetz, Walter
    et al.
    Max-Planck-Institut für Solar System Research.
    Madsen, Morten B.
    Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen.
    Edgett, Kenneth S.
    Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego.
    Clark, Benton C.
    Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colorado.
    Meslin, Pierre-Yves
    IRAP, CNRS/UPS, Toulouse.
    Blaney, Diana L.
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
    Bridges, Nathan
    Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland.
    Fisk, Martin
    University of Oregon, Corvallis, Oregon.
    Hviid, Stubbe F.
    DLR, Berlin.
    Kocurek, Gary
    University of Texas, Austin.
    Lasue, Jeremie
    IRAP, CNRS/UPS, Toulouse.
    Maurice, Sylvestre
    IRAP, CNRS/UPS, Toulouse.
    Newsom, Horton
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.
    Renno, Nilton
    University of Michigan.
    Rubin, David M.
    U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff.
    Sullivan, Robert
    Cornell University, Ithaca.
    Wiens, Roger C.
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Madrid.
    Compositional Variations of Rocknest Sand, Gale Crater, Mars2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Grotzinger, J.P.
    et al.
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology.
    Crisp, J.A.
    Indiana University, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
    Vasavada, Ashwin
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Curiosity's Mission of Exploration at Gale Crater, Mars2015In: Elements, ISSN 1811-5209, E-ISSN 1811-5217, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 19-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Landed missions to the surface of Mars have long sought to determine the material properties of rocks and soils encountered during the course of surface exploration. Increasingly, emphasis is placed on the study of materials formed or altered in the presence of liquid water. Placed in the context of their geological environment, these materials are then used to help evaluate ancient habitability. The Mars Science Laboratory mission—with its Curiosity rover—seeks to establish the availability of elements that may have fueled microbial metabolism, including carbon, hydrogen, sulfur, nitrogen, phosphorus, and a host of others at the trace element level. These measurements are most valuable when placed in a geological framework of ancient environments as interpreted from mapping, combined with an understanding of the petrogenesis of the igneous rocks and derived sedimentary materials. In turn, the analysis of solid materials and the reconstruction of ancient environments provide the basis to assess past habitability.

  • 48.
    Grotzinger, J.P.
    et al.
    Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology.
    Sumner, D.Y.
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California, Davis.
    Kah, L.C.
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
    Stack, K.
    Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology.
    Gupta, S.
    Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London.
    Edgar, L.
    School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University.
    Rubin, D.
    U.S. Geological Survey, Santa Cruz.
    Lewis, K.
    Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, New Jersey.
    Schieber, J.
    Indiana University, Department of Geological Sciences, Bloomington.
    Mangold, N.
    Laboratoire Planétologie et Géodynamique de Nantes, LPGN/CNRS and Université de Nantes.
    Milliken, R.
    Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Providence.
    Conrad, P.G.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    DesMarais, D.
    Department of Space Sciences, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field.
    Farmer, J.
    School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe.
    Siebach, K.
    Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology.
    III, F. Calef
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
    Hurowitz, J.
    Department of Geosciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook.
    McLennan, S.M.
    Department of Geosciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook.
    Ming, D.
    Jacobs Technology, NASA Johnson Space Center.
    Vaniman, D.
    Planetary Science Institute, Tucson.
    Crisp, J.
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
    Vasavada, A.
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
    Edgett, K.S.
    Malin Space Science Systems.
    Malin, M.
    Malin Space Science Systems.
    Blake, D.
    Department of Space Sciences, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field.
    Yingst, A
    Planetary Science Institute, Tucson.
    A habitable fluvio-lacustrine environment at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars2014In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 343, no 6169, article id 1242777Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Curiosity rover discovered fine-grained sedimentary rocks, which are inferred to represent an ancient lake and preserve evidence of an environment that would have been suited to support a martian biosphere founded on chemolithoautotrophy. This aqueous environment was characterized by neutral pH, low salinity, and variable redox states of both iron and sulfur species. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, and phosphorus were measured directly as key biogenic elements; by inference, phosphorus is assumed to have been available. The environment probably had a minimum duration of hundreds to tens of thousands of years. These results highlight the biological viability of fluvial-lacustrine environments in the post-Noachian history of Mars.

  • 49.
    Guzewich, Scott D.
    et al.
    NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center,Greenbelt, MD, USA.
    Lemmon, M.
    Space Science Institute, College Station, TX, USA.
    Smith, C.L
    Department of Earth and Space Science and Engineering, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Martínez, G.
    College of Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    de Vicente‐Retortillo, Á.
    College of Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    Newman, C. E.
    Aeolis Research, Pasadena, CA, USA.
    Baker, M.
    Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Campbell, C.
    Department of Earth and Space Science and Engineering, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Cooper, B.
    Department of Earth and Space Science and Engineering, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Gómez‐Elvira, J.
    Centro de Astrobiología (INTA‐CSIC), Madrid, Spain.
    Harri, A.‐M.
    Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hassler, D.
    Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO, USA.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC‐UGR), Armilla, Granada, Spain.
    McConnochie, T.
    Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA.
    Moores, J. E.
    Department of Earth and Space Science and Engineering, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Kahanpää, H.
    Finnish Meteorological Institute, , Helsinki, Finland; School of Electrical Engineering, Aalto University, , Espoo, Finland.
    Khayat, A.
    NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA;CRESST II and Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA.
    Richardson, M. I.
    Aeolis Research, Pasadena, CA, USA.
    Smith, M.D
    NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA.
    Sullivan, R.
    Cornell Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.
    de la Torre Juarez, M.
    Cornell Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.
    Vasavada, A.R
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA.
    Viúdez‐Moreiras, D.
    Centro de Astrobiología (INTA‐CSIC), Madrid, Spain.
    Zeitlin, C.
    Leidos, Houston, TX, USA.
    Zorzano Mier, María-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Mars Science Laboratory Observations of the 2018/Mars Year 34 Global Dust Storm2019In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 71-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover observations of the 2018/Mars year 34 global/planet‐encircling dust storm represent the first in situ measurements of a global dust storm with dedicated meteorological sensors since the Viking Landers. The Mars Science Laboratory team planned and executed a science campaign lasting approximately 100 Martian sols to study the storm involving an enhanced cadence of environmental monitoring using the rover's meteorological sensors, cameras, and spectrometers. Mast Camera 880‐nm optical depth reached 8.5, and Rover Environmental Monitoring Station measurements indicated a 97% reduction in incident total ultraviolet solar radiation at the surface, 30K reduction in diurnal range of air temperature, and an increase in the semidiurnal pressure tide amplitude to 40 Pa. No active dust‐lifting sites were detected within Gale Crater, and global and local atmospheric dynamics were drastically altered during the storm. This work presents an overview of the mission's storm observations and initial results.

  • 50.
    Guzewich, Scott D.
    et al.
    NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
    Newman, C. E.
    Aeolis Research, Pasadena, CA.
    Smith, M. D.
    NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
    Moores, J. E.
    Department of Earth and Space Science and Engineering, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Smith, C. L.
    Department of Earth and Space Science and Engineering, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Moore, C.
    Department of Earth and Space Science and Engineering, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Richardson, M. I.
    Aeolis Research, Pasadena, CA.
    Kass, D.
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.
    Kleinböhl, A.
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.
    Mischna, M.
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.
    Martín-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR), Granada, Spain.
    Zorzano Mier, Maria-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Centro de Astrobiología (INTA-CSIC), Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid, Spain.
    Battalio, M.
    Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX.
    The Vertical Dust Profile over Gale Crater, Mars2017In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets, ISSN 2169-9097, E-ISSN 2169-9100, Vol. 122, no 12, p. 2779-2792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We create a vertically coarse, but complete, vertical profile of dust mixing ratio from the surface to the upper atmosphere over Gale Crater, Mars, using the frequent joint atmospheric observations of the orbiting Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) and the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover. Using these data and an estimate of planetary boundary layer (PBL) depth from the MarsWRF general circulation model, we divide the vertical column into three regions. The first region is the Gale Crater PBL, the second is the MCS-sampled region, and the third is between these first two. We solve for a well-mixed dust mixing ratio within this third (middle) layer of atmosphere to complete the profile.

    We identify a unique seasonal cycle of dust within each atmospheric layer. Within the Gale PBL, dust mixing ratio maximizes near southern hemisphere summer solstice (Ls = 270°) and minimizes near winter solstice (Ls = 90-100°) with a smooth sinusoidal transition between them. However, the layer above Gale Crater and below the MCS-sampled region more closely follows the global opacity cycle and has a maximum in opacity near Ls = 240° and exhibits a local minimum (associated with the “solsticial pause” in dust storm activity) near Ls = 270°. With knowledge of the complete vertical dust profile, we can also assess the frequency of high-altitude dust layers over Gale. We determine that 36% of MCS profiles near Gale Crater contain an “absolute” high-altitude dust layer wherein the dust mixing ratio is the maximum in the entire vertical column.

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