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  • 1.
    Adhitya, I Putu Gde Surya
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, Universitas Udayana, P.B Sudirman Street, Denpasar, 80232, Bali, Indonesia.
    Wibawa, Ari
    Department of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, Universitas Udayana, P.B Sudirman Street, Denpasar, 80232, Bali, Indonesia.
    Aryana, I Gusti Ngurah Wien
    Department of Orthopaedic and Traumatology, College of Medicine and Sanglah General Hospital, Universitas Udayana, Pulau Nias Street, Denpasar, 80113, Bali, Indonesia.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the Indonesian version of the Lysholm knee score and Tegner activity scale in patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction2023In: Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies, ISSN 1360-8592, E-ISSN 1532-9283, Vol. 34, p. 53-59Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institution of Surgery and Experimental medicine, Linköping University, 581 85, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hallgren, Hanna Björnsson
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institution of Surgery and Experimental medicine, Linköping University, 581 85, Linköping, Sweden.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Union of Scaphoid Waist Fractures in Adults Despite No or Minimal Immobilization: a Report of Five Cases2020In: SN Comprehensive Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2523-8973, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 491-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally scaphoid waist fractures have been treated with a long period, 10–12 weeks, of immobilization in a plaster cast until radiological union. The long period of immobilization sometimes infers great discomfort for the patients. To avoid this, surgical treatment with screw fixation has for the last decade been advocated as an option also for undisplaced fractures. In this report, we present five cases with undisplaced scaphoid waist fractures that have healed both radiologically and clinically without any immobilization at all or after a very short period of protection in a cast. These observations challenge the current treatment guidelines.

  • 3.
    Al-Husseini, Ali
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Neurosurgery, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fazel Bakhsheshi, Mohammad
    Department of Family Medicine and Community Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; BrainCool AB, Medicon Village, Lund, Sweden.
    Gard, Anna
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Shorter Recovery Time in Concussed Elite Ice Hockey Players by Early Head-and-Neck Cooling: A Clinical Trial2023In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 40, no 11-12, p. 1075-1085Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sports-related concussion (SRC) is most commonly sustained in contact sports, and is defined as a mild traumatic brain injury. An exercise-induced elevation of core body temperature is associated with increased brain temperature that may accelerate secondary injury processes following SRC, and exacerbate the brain injury. In a recent pilot study, acute head-neck cooling of 29 concussed ice hockey players resulted in shorter time to return-to-play. Here, we extended the clinical trial to include players of 19 male elite Swedish ice hockey teams over five seasons (2016-2021). In the intervention teams, acute head-neck cooling was implemented using a head cap for ≥45 min in addition to the standard SRC management used in controls. The primary endpoint was time from SRC until return-to-play (RTP). Sixty-one SRCs were included in the intervention group and 71 SRCs in the control group. The number of previous SRCs was 2 (median and interquartile range [IQR]: 1.0-2.0) and 1 (IQR 1.0-2.0) in the intervention and control groups, respectively; p = 0.293. Median time to initiate head-neck cooling was 10 min (IQR 7-15; range 5-30 min) and median duration of cooling was 45 min (IQR 45-50; range 45-70 min). The median time to RTP was 9 days in the intervention group (IQR 7.0-13.5 days) and 13 days in the control group (IQR 9-30; p < 0.001). The proportion of players out from play for more than the expected recovery time of 14 days was 24.7% in the intervention group, and 43.7% in controls (p < 0.05). Study limitations include that: 1) allocation to cooling or control management was at the discretion of the medical staff of each team, decided prior to each season, and not by strict randomization; 2) no sham cap was used and evaluations could not be performed by blinded assessors; and 3) it could not be established with certainty that injury severity was similar between groups. While the results should thus be interpreted with caution, early head-neck cooling, with the aim of attenuating cerebral hyperthermia, may reduce post-SRC symptoms and lead to earlier return-to-play in elite ice hockey players.

  • 4.
    Al-Husseini, Ali
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gard, Anna
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fransson, Per-Anders
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Magnusson, Måns
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Tjernström, Fredrik
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Long-term postural control in elite athletes following mild traumatic brain injury2022In: Frontiers in Neurology, E-ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 13, article id 906594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Traumas to the head and neck are common in sports and often affects otherwise healthy young individuals. Sports-related concussions (SRC), defined as a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), may inflict persistent neck and shoulder pain, and headache, but also more complex symptoms, such as imbalance, dizziness, and visual disturbances. These more complex symptoms are difficult to identify with standard health care diagnostic procedures.

    Objective: To investigate postural control in a group of former elite athletes with persistent post-concussive symptoms (PPCS) at least 6 months after the incident.

    Method: Postural control was examined using posturography during quiet stance and randomized balance perturbations with eyes open and eyes closed. Randomized balance perturbations were used to examine motor learning through sensorimotor adaptation. Force platform recordings were converted to reflect the energy used to maintain balance and spectrally categorized into total energy used, energy used for smooth corrective changes of posture (i.e., <0.1 Hz), and energy used for fast corrective movements to maintain balance (i.e., >0.1 Hz).

    Results: The mTBI group included 20 (13 males, mean age 26.6 years) elite athletes with PPCS and the control group included 12 athletes (9 males, mean age 26.4 years) with no history of SRC. The mTBI group used significantly more energy during balance perturbations than controls: +143% total energy, p = 0.004; +122% low frequency energy, p = 0.007; and +162% high frequency energy, p = 0.004. The mTBI subjects also adapted less to the balance perturbations than controls in total (18% mTBI vs. 37% controls, p = 0.042), low frequency (24% mTBI vs. 42% controls, p = 0.046), and high frequency (6% mTBI vs. 28% controls, p = 0.040). The mTBI subjects used significantly more energy during quiet stance than controls: +128% total energy, p = 0.034; +136% low-frequency energy, p = 0.048; and +109% high-frequency energy, p = 0.015.

    Conclusion: Athletes with previous mTBI and PPCS used more energy to stand compared to controls during balance perturbations and quiet stance and had diminished sensorimotor adaptation. Sports-related concussions are able to affect postural control and motor learning.

  • 5.
    Arroyo-Morales, Manuel
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. Biohealth Research Institute in Granada (ibs.GRANADA), Granada, Spain, Sport and Health University Research Institute (iMUDS), Granada, Spain.
    Martin-Alguacil, Jose
    Orthopedic Surgery Service Hospital Nuestra Señora de la Salud, Granada, Spain.
    Lozano-Lozano, Mario
    Department of Physical Therapy, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. Sport and Health University Research Institute (iMUDS), Granada, Spain.
    Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciencies, University of Málaga, Andalucia. Instituto de Investigación en Biomedica de Málaga (IBIMA), Grupo de Clinimetria, Malaga, Spain. School of Clinical Sciences, The Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Fernández-Fernández, Andrés J.
    Department of Physical Therapy, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    González, Jose A.
    Department of Computer Science, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene
    Department of Physical Therapy, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. Biohealth Research Institute in Granada (ibs.GRANADA), Granada, Spain, Sport and Health University Research Institute (iMUDS), Granada, Spain.
    The Lysholm score: Cross cultural validation and evaluation of psychometric properties of the Spanish version2019In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 8, article id e0221376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    This study aims at assessing the validity and reliability of the Spanish version of the Lysholm score, a widely used instrument for assessing knee function and activity level after ligament injuries.

    Methods

    Ninety-five participants (67.4% male, 22±5 years) completed the questionnaire twice within 7 days and a subsample of 42 participants completed a test-retest reliability. Reliability, validity and feasibility psychometric properties were studied. The validity of the questionnaire was analysed using ceiling and floor effects. Factor structure and construct validity were analysed with the SF-36, the Hip and Knee Questionnaire (HKQ) and one leg jump test (OLJT).

    Results

    Criterion validity with the SF-36 Physical State was moderate (r = 0.50 and p<0.01), poor and inverse relationship (r = -0.31, p<0.01) with HKQ and positive moderate (r = 0.59, p<0.01) with OLJT. Measurement error from MDC90 was 3.9%. Exploratory factor analysis demonstrated a one-factor solution explaining 51.5% of total variance. The x2 test for the one-factor model was significant (x2 = 29.58, df = 20, p < 0.08). Test-retest reliability level was high (ICC2.1 = 0.92, p<0.01) and also the internal consistency (α = 0.77).

    Conclusion

    The Spanish Lysholm score demonstrated that it is a reliable and valid instrument that can be used to assess knee function after ligament injuries.

  • 6.
    Biasca, Nicola
    et al.
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Clinic.
    Agosti, Reto
    Headache Center Hirslanden, Zurich.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Battaglia, Hugo
    SUVA, Luzern.
    Gerber, Christian
    University of Zürich, Department of Orthopedics.
    Procedure after minor traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in ice hockey to prevent neurological sequele2004In: Safety in ice hockey, fourth volume: [papers presented at the Fourth Symposium on Ice Hockey held 5 - 6 May 2002 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania] / [ed] David J. Pearsall; Alan B. Ashare, West Conshohocken, Pa: ASTM International, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Biasca, Nicola
    et al.
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Clinic.
    Agosti, Reto
    Headache Center Hirslanden, Zurich.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Battaglia, Hugo
    SUVA, Luzern.
    Gerber, Christian
    University of Zürich, Department of Orthopedics.
    Procedures after minor traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in ice hockey to prevent neurological sequelae2001In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 367-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Biasca, Nicola
    et al.
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Clinic.
    Battaglia, Hugo
    SUVA, Luzern.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Behandlungsvorschläge der Commotio cerebri bei Kontakt- och Kampfsportarten: Beispiel im Eishockey1999In: Schweizerische Ärztezeitung, ISSN 1423-0496, Vol. 80, no 10, p. 595-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Biasca, Nicola
    et al.
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Surgery and Trauma Surgery.
    Lorentzon, Ronny
    Umeå University, Department of Musculoskeletal Research.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Montag, Wolf-Dieter
    Injury report system2000In: Safety in ice hockey: third volume / [ed] Alan B. Ashare, West Conshohocken, Pa: ASTM International, 2000, p. 44-62Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Biasca, Nicola
    et al.
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Surgery and Trauma Surgery.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    International sports injury system: ISIS2001In: Sports medicine & hockey: a summit for the NHL and beyond, AOSSM , 2001, p. 15-36Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Biasca, Nicola
    et al.
    Spital Oberengadin, Clinic of Orthopedic Surgery, Trauma Surgery, and Sports Medicine, Department of Surgery.
    Wirth, Stephan
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Clinic.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Head injuries and facial injuries in ice hockey: role of the protective equipment2005In: European Journal of Trauma, ISSN 1439-0590, E-ISSN 1615-3146, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 369-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose: Despite a decreasing tendency of head and facial injuries in ice hockey the number of these injuries still seems to be too high. The purpose of this prospective investigation was to study the mechanism of facial and eye injuries as well as the role of protective equipment and revised rules. Methods: A prospective epidemiologic analysis of ice hockey-related injuries in the two highest-ranking Swiss Ice Hockey Leagues-League A (NLA) and B (NLB)-was performed by the Swiss Medical Committee during the two seasons 1996 and 1997. Results: A total of 392 injuries occurred during games or practice. Head injuries and facial injuries made up 26% of these injuries. Most of these injuries were classified as minor injuries. All eye injuries occurred in players either not wearing visors at all or wearing the visor incorrectly. Most injuries were caused by the illegal use of sticks. Conclusion: Most head injuries and facial injuries could be prevented by wearing helmet and visor correctly and by playing the game according to the rules

  • 12.
    Biasca, Nicola
    et al.
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Surgery and Trauma Surgery.
    Wirth, Stephan
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Clinic.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    The avoidability of head and neck injuries in ice hockey: an historical review2002In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 410-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of minor traumatic brain injury (mTBI), cerebral concussions, is increasing and cannot be eliminated by any kind of equipment. Prevention strategies, such as the introduction of "checking from behind" rules have become effective in decreasing the number of severe spinal injuries. A new "head checking" rule should reduce mTBI in the same way in the following years. Mouthguards should be mandatory as an effective device for the prevention of dental and orofacial injuries, as well as reducing the incidence and severity of mTBI. A new internet database system, the International Sports Injury System (ISIS) should improve epidemiological analysis of head, face, and spinal injuries worldwide.ISIS should provide an internationally compatible system for continuous monitoring of risk factors, protective effects of equipment, and protective effects of equipment and effects of changes in rules through the years.

  • 13.
    Briggs, Karen K.
    et al.
    Steadman Hawkins research foundation, Basic science research, Vail.
    Lysholm, Jack
    Läkarhuset Hermelinen Luleå, Sjukgymnastiken.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Rodkey, William G
    Steadman Hawkins research foundation, Basic science research, Vail.
    Kocher, Mininder S.
    Harvard University, School of Medicine, Childrens Hospital, Boston.
    Steadman, J. Richard
    Steadman Hawkins research foundation, Basic science research, Vail.
    The reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the Lysholm score and Tegner activity scale for anterior cruciate ligament injuries of the knee2009In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0363-5465, E-ISSN 1552-3365, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 890-897Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In 1982, the Lysholm score was first published as a physician-administered score in the American Journal of Sports Medicine. The Tegner activity scale was published in 1985. Hypothesis: The Lysholm and Tegner scores are valid as patient-administered scores and responsive at early time points after treatment of anterior cruciate ligament tears.Study Design: Cohort study (Diagnosis); Level of evidence, 1.Methods: All patients were treated for an anterior cruciate ligament tear. For responsiveness, the Lysholm score (n = 1075) and Tegner activity level (n = 505) were measured preoperatively and 6, 9, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. For test-retest (n = 50), scores were measured at 2 years postoperatively and again within 4 weeks by questionnaire. For criterion validity (n = 170), patients completed the Short Form-12 and the International Knee Documentation Committee score in addition to Lysholm and Tegner instruments. For all other analyses, preoperative Lysholm score (n = 1783) or Tegner activity levels (n = 687) were collected.Results: There was acceptable test-retest reliability for both the Lysholm (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.9) and Tegner (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.8) scores. The minimum detectable change for Lysholm was 8.9 and for Tegner was 1. The Lysholm demonstrated acceptable internal consistency. The Lysholm correlated with the International Knee Documentation Committee (r = .8) and the Short Form-12 (r = .4), and Tegner correlated with the Short Form-12 (r = .2). Both scores had acceptable floor and ceiling effects and all hypotheses were significant. The Lysholm and Tegner were responsive to change at each of the time points.Conclusion: After 25 years of changes in treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injuries, the Lysholm knee score and the Tegner activity scale demonstrated acceptable psychometric parameters as patient-administered scores and showed acceptable responsiveness to be used in early return to function after anterior cruciate ligament treatment.

  • 14.
    Briggs, Karen K.
    et al.
    Steadman Hawkins research foundation, Basic science research, Vail.
    Lysholm, Jack
    Winternet.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Rodkey, William G.
    Steadman Hawkins research foundation, Basic science research, Vail.
    Steadman, J. Richard
    Steadman Hawkins research foundation, Basic science research, Vail.
    25 years later: the reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Lysholm score and Tegner activity scale for anterior cruciate ligament injury of tne knee2008In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 16, no Suppl. 1, p. S34-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Burman, Erik
    et al.
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University.
    Lysholm, Jack
    Linköping University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sports and Ttrauma Research Group, Winternet, Bodens sjukhus, Ortopedkliniken, Läkarhuset Hermelinen Luleå, Sjukgymnastiken, Department of Orthopaedics, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Department of Orthopaedics, Sunderby Hospital.
    Shahim, Pashtun
    Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Department of Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal.
    Malm, Christer
    Umeå University, Department of Integrative Medical Biology, Winternet, Department of Sports Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Concussed athletes are more prone to injury both before and after their index concussion: data base analysis of 699 concussed contact sports athletes2016In: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, ISSN 2055-7647, Vol. 2, no 1, article id e000092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Ice hockey and football players suffering concussions might have an increased risk for injuries afterwards. We aimed to investigate if concussions predisposed athletes for subsequent sport injuries. Methods Patient data were obtained from a data base established at the University Hospital in Umea, Sweden. Athletes who had suffered a concussion were included if they had been aged between 15 and 35 years of age, and played ice hockey, football (soccer), floorball and handball. They were studied in terms of all new or previous injuries during 24 months before and after their concussion. Results were compared with a control group of athletes from the same four sports with an ankle injury. Results Athletes with a concussion were more likely to sustain injuries compared with the control group, both before (OR 1.98. 95% CI 1.45 to 2.72) and after the concussion (OR 1.72. 95% CI 1.26 to 2.37). No increase in frequency of injury was found after a concussion compared with before. This was true for athletes in all four sports and for both sexes. Conclusions This study indicates that athletes sustaining a concussion may have a more aggressive or risk-taking style of play than their counterparts. Our data do not suggest that a concussion injury, per se, leads to subsequent injuries.

  • 16.
    Carson, JD
    et al.
    University of Toronto, Women's College Hospital Sport Centre for Advanced Research and Education.
    Tator, CH
    Toronto Western Hospital, Division of Neurosurgery.
    Provvidenza, CF
    ThinkFirst-SportSmart Sports and Recreational Injuries Research and Prevention Centre, Toronto.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    LaPrade, RF
    University of Minnesota, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery.
    Biasca, Nicola
    Spital Oberengadin, Orthopaedic Clinic.
    Mueller, FO
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
    Mölsä, Jouko
    LIKES Research Center for Sport and Health Sciences, Jyväskylä.
    Cushman, RA
    Prevention of spinal injuries in ice hockey players: an international perspective2004In: Rendez-Vous 2004: Sport medicine symposium, Vancouver, Canada, March 15-17 2004, 2004, p. 380-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Dietrich, Marcelo O.
    et al.
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Departamento de Bioquimica, ICBS.
    Souza, DO
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Departamento de Bioquimica, ICBS.
    Portela, LV
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Departamento de Bioquimica, ICBS.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Sojka, Peter
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine, Umeå univesity.
    Serum S100B protein: what does it mean during exercise?2004In: Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 1050-642X, E-ISSN 1536-3724, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 368-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Diref, A.
    et al.
    Gilenstam, Kajsa
    Umeå universitet, Kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, idrottsmedicin.
    Lundgren, Lars
    Läkarhuset Hermelinen Luleå, Sjukgymnastiken.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    The relationship between internal and external hip rotation with unilateral knee, lower leg or foot pain1997In: Abstracts Sjukgymnastdagarna 1997: 25-27 september 1997, Stockholmsmässan, Stockholm: Legitimerade sjukgymnasters riksförbund , 1997Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Engström, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing and Medical technology.
    Jumisko, Eija
    Development Manager, Lapland University of Applied Sciences, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Shahim, Pashtun
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience & Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Molndal, Sweden.
    Lehto, Niklas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Department of Psychiatry & Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience & Physiology, the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg & Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Molndal, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Department of Psychiatry & Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience & Physiology, the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg & Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Molndal, Sweden. Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, Queen Square & UK Dementia Research Institute at UCL, London, UK .
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Losing the identity of a hockey player: the long-term effects of concussions2020In: Concussion, E-ISSN 2056-3299, Vol. 5, no 2, article id CNC74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe what suffering multiple concussions meant for former semi-professional or professional hockey players who were forced to end their career. Results: Nine former Swedish hockey players, who once played on national or professional teams were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed with reference to hermeneutic phenomenology to interpret and explain their experiences. The theme of losing one’s identity as a hockey player was constructed from five subthemes: being limited in everyday life, returning to the hockey stadium as soon as possible, forming a post career identity, lacking understanding and support, and preventing injuries by respecting other players. Conclusion: The former hockey players struggled with developing their off-the-ice identities and with finding other sources of meaning for their lives.

    Lay abstract

    Despite considerable attention to improving the initial management of concussions suffered by hockey players, few studies have examined their long-term effects. In response, the study reported here aimed to describe what suffering multiple concussions meant for former semi-professional or professional hockey players who were forced to end their career. Nine former Swedish hockey players, who once played on national or professional teams were interviewed and the interviews were analyzed in order to interpret and explain their experiences. The overall theme was formulated as losing one’s identity as a hockey player. In conclusion, the former hockey players seem to struggle with developing their off-the-ice identities and with finding other sources of meaning for their lives.

  • 20.
    Eriksson, Thomas
    et al.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Isaksson, Marléne
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    The use of photos from patch-test reactions on day 7 taken by mobile phones by professional ice hockey players in Sweden investigated for the presence of occupational dermatoses2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Eriksson, Thomas
    et al.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Isaksson, Marléne
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Bruze, M.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital.
    The use of photos from patch-test reactions on day 7 taken by mobile phones by professional ice hockey players in Sweden investigated for the presence of occupational dermatoses2016In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 75, no Suppl. 1, p. 39-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    survey was undertaken in all ice hockey players in 26 professional teams in Sweden representing the two highest divisions. All players answered a questionnaire and the players from six teams, three from each of the two divisions, were patch tested with 72 test preparations in a baseline series supplemented with a series representing the work environment of the players. For practical reasons, the patch testing and test reading on day 3 took place in the arenas of the teams. As a traditional dermatologist reading on day 7 was impossible to perform in all but one team, the players and coaches were asked to use their mobile phones to take photos of the tested backs of the players on day 7 and to send them to the investigative team. In one team a dermatologist reading took place on day 7 independently of the mobile phone photos. In total, 107 players in the six teams were patch tested, and a reading on day 3 was performed in 103. Fifty contact allergic reactions were noted in 26 players. When comparing the reactions present on day 3 with the photos from day 7, seven (14%) more positive reactions were registered. The seven additional reactions were noted to seven different sensitizers: hexavalent chromium, oxidized linalool, thiomersal, mercapto mix, mercaptobenzothiazole, PFR-2 (a resol resin based on phenol and formaldehyde) and methylenedianiline. In summary, 14% more contact allergic reactions were diagnosed when using photos of the tested backs to replace the traditional dermatologist reading.

  • 22.
    Eriksson, Tomas
    et al.
    Occupational and Environmental Dermatology.
    Isaksson, Marlene
    Occupational and Environmental Dermatology.
    Engfeldt, Malin
    Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, University of Malmo-Lund.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Occupational and Environmental Dermatology.
    conact allergy in ice hockey players in Sweden2010Conference paper (Other academic)
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  • 23.
    Ersson, Bernt
    et al.
    Allmänläkare, Gävle.
    Aurell, Inger
    Läkarhuset Hermelinen Luleå, Sjukgymnastiken.
    Billsen, Mats
    Ortopediska kliniken Hässleolm-Kristianstad.
    Dobrescu, Tudor
    Tudorkliniken, Halmstad.
    Dobrescu, Daniela
    Landstingshälsan, Halmstad.
    Flodin, Marianne
    Värmdö Primärvård.
    Pettersson-Hanning, Jan
    Läkarhuset Hermelinen Luleå, Sjukgymnastiken.
    Henriksson, Anders
    Läkarhuset Hermelinen Luleå, Sjukgymnastiken.
    Holmberg, Göran
    Jensen, Jörn
    Sjukhuset Varberg, Röntgenkliniken.
    Ludwig, Bernd
    Landskrona Läkargrupp.
    Magnusson, Ulla
    Möller, Agneta
    Läkarhuset Hermelinen Luleå, Sjukgymnastiken.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Osteoporos: DXL-hälmätare använd med förstånd räcker långt för klinisk användning2003In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 100, no 3, p. 156-157Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Eshuis, Rienk
    et al.
    St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nieuwegein.
    Lentjes, Gijsbertus Wilhelmus
    St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nieuwegein.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Wolterbeek, Nienke
    St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nieuwegein.
    Veen, Maurits Remmelt
    St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nieuwegein.
    Dutch Translation and Cross-cultural Adaption of the Lysholm Score and Tegner Activity Scale for Patients With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries2016In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, ISSN 0190-6011, E-ISSN 1938-1344, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 976-983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design Clinical measurement. Background The Lysholm score and Tegner Activity Scale are frequently used patient-reported instruments to determine the functional status and activity level after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Objectives To translate and cross-culturally adapt the Lysholm score and Tegner Activity Scale for use in the Dutch population and to evaluate reliability and validity of these questionnaires in individuals after ACL reconstruction. Methods The translation and adaptation was conducted in several steps according to the guidelines in the literature. The measurement properties of the Lysholm score and Tegner Activity Scale (internal consistency, construct validity, and floor and ceiling effects) were tested in 96 patients. Reproducibility was tested in 69 patients, for patient with anterior cruciate ligament injuries. On the first occasion, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and RAND-36 item Health Survey (RAND-36) were also administered. Results The Lysholm score and Tegner Activity Scale showed good test-retest reliability between repeated measures (respectively ICC 0.93 and 0.97). Internal consistency was reasonable to good (Cronbach's α=0.70-0.83). The Lysholm score had a very strong correlation with the IKDC (r= 0.83, p<0.01) and moderate correlation with the RAND-36 (r=0.55, p<0.01). The Tegner Activity Scale had a moderate correlation with both IKDC and the RAND-36 (r= 0.42 p<0.01 respectively r= 0.48 p<0.01). Conclusion This study demonstrated acceptable psychometric performances for the Lysholm score and the Tegner scale as outcome measures for Dutch patients after ACL reconstruction. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 28 Sep 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6566.

  • 25.
    Fredriksson, A-S
    et al.
    Bodens sjukhus, Ortopedkliniken.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Långtidsresultat efter Putti Platt operation pga recidiverande axelledsluxation1987In: Program & sammanfattningar. 44: Stockholm 2-4 dec. 1987, Stockholm: Svenska läkaresällskapet , 1987, p. 250-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Fredriksson, A-S
    et al.
    Boden Central Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Results of the Putti-Platt operation for recurrent anterior dislocation of the shoulder1991In: International Orthopaedics, ISSN 0341-2695, E-ISSN 1432-5195, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 185-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 1973 and 1981, 101 patients had a Putti-Platt repair for recurrent dislocation of the shoulder; 89 of them were followed up and 43 underwent a clinical examination, 23 being assessed with the Cybex dynamometer. The 46 who did not attend were interviewed by telephone. The mean follow up time was 8 +/- 2 years (range 5-14 years). Redislocation occurred in 18 patients (20%), but this was twice as high in patients who were aged under 26 years at the time of operation compared with those who were older (29% versus 13%). The time of recurrence was between 1 and 11 years after operation. A decrease in strength and power of abduction, internal and external rotation, was found in the affected shoulder. Restriction of all measured movements, particularly external rotation, was also found in all patients. Nevertheless most had a high functional score and relatively few symptoms. We conclude that the Putti-Platt procedure has a high recurrence rate in younger patients, and we hesitate to recommend it for young active individuals.

  • 27.
    Fredriksson, A-S
    et al.
    Bodens sjukhus, Ortopedkliniken.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Wallström, Lars-Erik
    Sundkvist, B.
    Långtidsresultat efter Putti Platt operation pga recidiverande axelledslucation1987In: IMN journalen, no 2, p. 20-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Gard, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Neurosurgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Al-Husseini, Ali
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Neurosurgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Kornaropoulos, Evgenios N.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Diagnostic Radiology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    De Maio, Alessandro
    Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences. Policlinico Umberto I, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Björkman-Burtscher, Isabella
    Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Markenroth Bloch, Karin
    Lund University Bioimaging Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Markus
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Diagnostic Radiology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Måns
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Otorhinolaryngology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Neurosurgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Post-Concussive Vestibular Dysfunction Is Related to Injury to the Inferior Vestibular Nerve2022In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 39, no 11-12, p. 829-840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Symptoms of vestibular dysfunction such as dizziness and vertigo are common after sports-related concussions (SRC) and associated with a worse outcome and a prolonged recovery. Vestibular dysfunction after SRC can be because of an impairment of the peripheral or central neural parts of the vestibular system. The aim of the present study was to establish the cause of vestibular impairment in athletes with SRC who have persisting post-concussive symptoms (PPCS). We recruited 42 participants—21 athletes with previous SRCs and PPCS ≥6 months and 21 healthy athletic age- and sex-matched controls—who underwent symptom rating, a detailed test battery of vestibular function and 7T magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) of cerebellar white matter tracts, and T1-weighted imaging for cerebellar volumetrics. Vestibular dysfunction was observed in 13 SRC athletes and three controls (p = 0.001). Athletes with vestibular dysfunction reported more pronounced symptoms on the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI; p < 0.001) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS; p < 0.001). No significant differences in DTI metrics were found, while in DKI two metrics were observed in the superior and/or inferior cerebellar tracts. Cerebellar gray and white matter volumes were similar in athletes with SRC and controls. Compared with controls, pathological video head impulse test results (vHIT; p < 0.001) and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP; p = 0.002) were observed in athletes with SRC, indicating peripheral vestibular dysfunction and specifically suggesting injury to the inferior vestibular nerve. In athletes with persisting symptoms after SRC, vestibular dysfunction is associated with injury to the inferior vestibular nerve.

  • 29.
    Gard, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund 222 41, Sweden.
    Lehto, Niklas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing and Medical technology.
    Shahim, Pashtun
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience & Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal 431 41, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience & Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal 431 41, Sweden.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience & Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal 431 41, Sweden.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund 222 41, Sweden.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Quality of life of ice hockey players after retirement due to concussions2020In: Concussion, E-ISSN 2056-3299, Vol. 5, no 3, article id CNC78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sports-related concussion (SRC) is increasingly recognized as a potential health problem in ice hockey. Quality of life (QoL) in players retiring due to SRC has not been thoroughly addressed. Materials & methods: QoL using the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool 5th Edition, Impact of Event Scale-Revised and Short Form Health Survey was measured in Swedish ice hockey players who retired due to persistence of postconcussion symptoms or fear of attaining additional SRC. Results: A total of 76 players were assessed, on average of 5 years after their most recent SRC. Overall, retired players had a high burden of postconcussion symptoms and reduced QoL. Conclusion: Retired concussed ice hockey players have a reduced QoL, particularly those retiring due to postconcussion symptoms. Symptom burden should be continuously evaluated and guide the decision to retire.

  • 30.
    Gard, Anna
    et al.
    Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Lund, Sweden.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Bakhsheshi, Mohammad Fazel
    Lund University, Family Medicine & Community Medicine, Lund, Sweden; BrainCool AB, Medicon Village, Lund, Sweden.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Lund, Sweden.
    Selective head–neck cooling after concussion shortens return-to-play in ice hockey players2021In: Concussion, E-ISSN 2056-3299, Vol. 6, no 2, article id CNC90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We aimed to investigate whether selective head–neck cooling could shorten recovery after sports-related concussions (SRCs). In a nonrandomized study of 15 Swedish professional ice hockey teams, 29 concussed players received immediate head and neck cooling for ≥30 min (initiated at 12.3 ± 9.2 min post-SRC by a portable cooling system), and 52 SRC controls received standard management. Players receiving head–neck cooling had shorter time to return-to-play than controls (7 vs 12.5 days, p < 0.0001), and 7% in the intervention group versus 25% in the control group were out of play for ≥3 weeks (p = 0.07). Immediate selective head–neck cooling is a promising option in the acute management of SRC that should be addressed in larger cohorts.

  • 31.
    Gard, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Vedung, Fredrik
    Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Neuroimmunology Unit, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Khademi, Mohsen
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Neuroimmunology Unit, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wernersson, Maria Portonova
    Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Rorsman, Ia
    Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Pessah-Rasmussen, Hélène
    Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ruscher, Karsten
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital EA-Blocket Plan 4, Klinikgatan 17A7, 221 85, Lund, Sweden.
    Cerebrospinal fluid levels of neuroinflammatory biomarkers are increased in athletes with persistent post-concussive symptoms following sports-related concussion2023In: Journal of Neuroinflammation, ISSN 1742-2094, E-ISSN 1742-2094, Vol. 20, article id 189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sports-related concussion (SRC) is often caused by rapid head rotation at impact, leading to shearing and stretching of axons in the white matter and initiation of secondary inflammatory processes that may exacerbate the initial injury. We hypothesized that athletes with persistent post-concussive symptoms (PPCS) display signs of ongoing neuroinflammation, as reflected by altered profiles of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, in turn relating to symptom severity. We recruited athletes with PPCS preventing sports participation as well as limiting work, school and/or social activities for ≥ 6 months for symptom rating using the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool, version 5 (SCAT-5) and for cognitive assessment using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS). Following a spinal tap, we analysed 27 CSF inflammatory biomarkers (pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokine panels) by a multiplex immunoassay using antibodies as electrochemiluminescent labels to quantify concentrations in PPCS athletes, and in healthy age- and sex-matched controls exercising ≤ 2 times/week at low-to-moderate intensity. Thirty-six subjects were included, 24 athletes with PPCS and 12 controls. The SRC athletes had sustained a median of five concussions, the most recent at a median of 17 months prior to the investigation. CSF cytokines and chemokines levels were significantly increased in eight (IL-2, TNF-α, IL-15, TNF-β, VEGF, Eotaxin, IP-10, and TARC), significantly decreased in one (Eotaxin-3), and unaltered in 16 in SRC athletes when compared to controls, and two were un-detectable. The SRC athletes reported many and severe post-concussive symptoms on SCAT5, and 10 out of 24 athletes performed in the impaired range (Z < − 1.5) on cognitive testing. Individual biomarker concentrations did not strongly correlate with symptom rating or cognitive function. Limitations include evaluation at a single post-injury time point in relatively small cohorts, and no control group of concussed athletes without persisting symptoms was included. Based on CSF inflammatory marker profiling we find signs of ongoing neuroinflammation persisting months to years after the last SRC in athletes with persistent post-concussive symptoms. Since an ongoing inflammatory response may exacerbate the brain injury these results encourage studies of treatments targeting the post-injury inflammatory response in sports-related concussion.

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  • 32.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University Hospital. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery.
    Pettersson, Gunnar
    Linköping University Hospital. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University Hospital. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery.
    Function testing in patients with old rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament1990In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0172-4622, E-ISSN 1439-3964, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 73-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifteen patients with isolated old rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) were examined to judge their functional disability. The following basic factors were used for evaluation: thigh muscle strength testing, stabilometry in a one-leg stance with straight and flexed knee, gait analysis, performance tests, knee function score, activity grading scale, and clinical joint laxity tests. We found that these rehabilitated patients mainly had impaired performance in those tests which greatly stressed the knee joint's sagittal stability. One-leg hop length was impaired for the injured limb. This group of patients had bilateral impairment of postural control compared with a reference group. This dysfunction was not revealed when comparing limbs. A derotation brace (ECKO) had neither a positive nor a negative effect in the tests. Different aspects of knee function evaluation are emphasized. Some of the altered functions are suggested to be due to central adjustments of motor control.

  • 33.
    Hammar, Carsten
    et al.
    Bodens sjukhus, Ortopedkliniken.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Sakroiliit som komplikation till isoretinoidterapi: Sacroiliitis as a complication of isoretinoid therapy1990In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 87, no 32-33, p. 2513-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34. Holmner, F.
    et al.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Axelskador hos svenska ishockeyspelare1991In: Program & sammanfattningar. 48: Älvsjö, Stockholm 27-29 november 1991, Stockholm: Svenska läkaresällskapet , 1991Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Huang, Hongshi
    et al.
    Department of Sports Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Institute of Sports Medicine of Peking University, Beijing Key Laboratory of Sports Injuries, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Si
    Department of Sports Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Institute of Sports Medicine of Peking University, Beijing Key Laboratory of Sports Injuries, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Yi
    Department of Sports Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Institute of Sports Medicine of Peking University, Beijing Key Laboratory of Sports Injuries, Beijing, China.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Wang, Yongjian
    Department of Sports Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Institute of Sports Medicine of Peking University, Beijing Key Laboratory of Sports Injuries, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Yanfang
    Department of Sports Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Institute of Sports Medicine of Peking University, Beijing Key Laboratory of Sports Injuries, Beijing, China.
    Ao, Yingfang
    Department of Sports Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Institute of Sports Medicine of Peking University, Beijing Key Laboratory of Sports Injuries, Beijing, China.
    Reliability and Validity of a Chinese Version of the Lysholm Score and Tegner Activity Scale for Knee Arthroplasty2022In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 54, article id jrm00317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To verify the reliability and validity of Chinese versions of the Lysholm score and the Tegner activity scale for knee arthroplasty.

    Methods: Sixty-four patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty and 28 healthy volunteers were included in this study. Participants were divided into 4 groups: a pre-operation group; a 3 months post-operation group; a 1-year post-operation group; and a control group of healthy volunteers. Participants completed the Lysholm score and Tegner activity scale twice over a period of 3–7 days.

    Results: The intraclass correlation coefficients of the Lysholm score and Tegner scale were both relatively high, at 0.99 and 0.97, respectively. Moreover, the Cronbach’s alpha of the Lysholm score was 0.71. The items “locking” and “instability” differed slightly between groups (Kruskal–Wallis: for locking, χ2 (p) = 13.48, p = 0.0037; for instability, χ2 (p) = 4.32, p = 0.2292).

    Conclusion: The simplified-Chinese versions of the Lysholm score and the Tegner scale are applicable for use with patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, and have relatively high validity and reliability. The items “locking” and “instability” should be combined with clinical data to make the Lysholm score more suitable for assessment of total knee arthroplasty.

  • 36.
    Hänni, Sofie
    et al.
    Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Department of Surgical Sciences, Anesthesiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vedung, Fredrik
    Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Skane University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Johansson, Jakob
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Anesthesiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Soccer-Related Concussions Among Swedish Elite Soccer Players: A Descriptive Study of 1,030 Players2020In: Frontiers in Neurology, E-ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 11, article id 510800Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:There are growing concerns about the short- and long-term consequences of sports-related concussion, which account for about 5-9% of all sports injuries. We hypothesized there may be sex differences in concussion history and concussion-related symptoms, evaluated among elite soccer players in Sweden. Design:Retrospective survey study. Participants and Setting:Soccer players (n= 1,030) from 55 Swedish elite soccer teams. Questionnaires were completed prior to the start of the 2017 season. Assessment of Risk Factors:Player history of soccer-related concussion (SoRC), symptoms and management following a SoRC were evaluated. Main Outcome Measures:Before the start of the season the players completed a baseline questionnaire assessing previous concussions. The Sports Concussion Assessment Tool 3 was included with regard to symptom evaluation. Results:Out of 993 responding players 334 (34.6%) reported a previous SoRC and 103 players (10.4%) reported a SoRC during the past year. After sustaining a SoRC, 114 players (34.2%) reported that they continued their ongoing activity without a period of rest, more commonly female (44.9%) than male players (27.7%;P= 0.002). Symptom resolution time was 1 week or less for 61.3% of the players that reported having persisting symptoms. A positive correlation was observed between number of previous concussions and prevalence of three persisting symptoms: fatigue (P< 0.001), concentration/memory issues (P= 0.002) and headache (P= 0.047). Conclusion:About 35% of male and female elite soccer players in Sweden have experienced a previous SoRC, and about 10% experienced a SoRC during the last year. Female players continued to play after a SoRC, without a period of rest, more often than males. A higher risk of persisting symptoms was observed in players with a history of multiple concussions.

  • 37.
    Itthipanichpong, Thun
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Moonwong, Songthai
    Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Thamrongskulsiri, Napatpong
    Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Prasathaporn, Niti
    Department of Orthopaedics, Ramkhamhaeng Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Kuptniratsaikul, Somsak
    Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Lysholm, Jack
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umea, Sweden..
    Tanpowpong, Thanathep
    Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Validity and Reliability of the Thai Versions of the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale and Tegner Activity Scale2023In: The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 2325-9671, Vol. 11, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Functional or quality of life questionnaires are important tools in clinical investigations. The Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale and Tegner Activity Scale are knee-specific questionnaires that are widely used to assess knee function.

    Purpose: To translate both questionnaires into Thai and to assess the validity and reliability of the Thai versions of the Lysholm and adjusted Tegner scales.

    Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3.

    Methods: The Lysholm and Tegner scales were translated into Thai by using the forward-backward translation protocol. Because cultural modifications were made to the sports used to measure activity on the Tegner scale, the authors of this study refer to the Thai version as the “Thai adjusted Tegner scale.” The reliability and validity of the translated scales were evaluated by obtaining the responses of 60 consecutive patients (mean age, 40.5 years; 34 male, 26 female); the patients also completed the Thai version of the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form (IKDC-SKF). Criterion validity was tested by correlating the scores from both translated questionnaires with those from the Thai IKDC-SKF, while reliability was assessed by measuring test-retest reliability and internal consistency.

    Results: The Thai Lysholm scale showed a strong correlation with the Thai IKDC-SKF (r = 0.89), while the Thai adjusted Tegner scale showed a moderate correlation with the Thai IKDC-SKF (r = 0.60). The intrarater and test-retest reliability measures were excellent for the Thai Lysholm (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], 0.94 and 0.98, respectively) and moderate to good for the Thai adjusted Tegner (ICC, 0.73 and 0.86, respectively). The internal consistency for the Thai Lysholm was acceptable at all the time points (Cronbach alpha, 0.71-0.73).

    Conclusion: The Thai Lysholm and Thai adjusted Tegner scales adequately retained the characteristics of the original versions. They can be considered reliable instruments for Thai patients with knee-related problems.

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  • 38.
    Jacobson, Inger
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Hur ser en damfotbollspelare ut?1999In: Svensk idrottsmedicinsk förenings vårmöte: Ystad 1999, Svensk idrottsmedicinsk förening , 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Jacobson, Inger
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Injuries among female football players - With special emphasis on region differences2007In: Svensk idrottsmedicinsk förenings vårmöte: Uppsala 2007, 2007, p. 43-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Jacobson, Inger
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Injuries among female football players: with special emphasis on regional differences2006In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 66-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this 1-year prospective study, the aim was to investigate if there are any differences concerning injuries and injury incidence during an entire football season between Swedish female football players from different geographical regions. A total of 130 out of 253 players (51%) sustained 229 injuries. The overall injury incidence was 9.6/1000 h of football. The incidence of injury during practice was 8.4/1000 h and during game was 13.3/1000 h. Players in the north had a higher incidence of injury during game than those in the south (19.5 vs. 7.2/1000 h, respectively, p<0.001). Fifty-nine per cent of all injuries were traumatic injuries. Both traumatic and overuse injuries occurred mainly during the early preseason and at the beginning of the competitive spring season. Of all injuries, 13% were classified as slight, 39% as minor, 37% as moderate and 11% as major injuries. Players in the north had a higher injury incidence concerning moderate injuries than players in the south (p<0.01). In the present study, evidence is presented that regional factors play a role in the injury incidence. Female football players in the north and south have different injury patterns. This could be a result of different conditions for football as a sport between the regions.

  • 41.
    Jacobson, Inger
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Injuries among female football players: with special emphasis on regional differences2007In: Abstraktbok Sjukgymnastdagarna 10-12 oktober 2007, Stockholm: LSR , 2007, p. 11-12Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 42.
    Jacobson, Inger
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Injuries among swedish female elite football players: a prospective population study2007In: Abstraktbok Sjukgymnastdagarna 10-12 oktober 2007, Stockholm: LSR , 2007, p. 12-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 43.
    Jacobson, Inger
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Injuries among Swedish female elite football players: a prospective population study2007In: Svensk idrottsmedcinsk förenings vårmöte: Uppsala 2007, 2007, p. 44-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Jacobson, Inger
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Injuries among swedish female elite football players: a prospective population study2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 84-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Injury occurrence in all 12 female elite senior football teams in premiere league was registered during 1 year. Of 269 players, 129 (48%) sustained 237 injuries. The total injury incidence was 4.6/1000 h of football. The injury incidence during practice was 2.7 and during the game time was 13.9/1000 h. The highest injury incidence during practice was to the knee (0.8/1000 h) and thigh (0.5/1000 h), and during game time was to the knee (4.4/1000 h) and head (2.2/1000 h). In total, the location for the highest injury incidence was the knee with 1.5 injuries/1000 h of football. The majority of injuries (82%) were localized to the lower extremities. Sixty-six injuries (28%) were re-occurring injuries (re-injuries). The incidence of traumatic injuries was 3.3/1000 h of football and for overuse injuries 1.3/1000 h. Overuse injuries occurred mainly during the preseason and at the beginning of the spring season. Thirty-nine percent of the injuries were slight or minor causing absence from practice or game time of less than 1 week, 39% were moderate (absence 7-28 days) and 22% were major (absence more than 28 days). The major injuries occurred often owing to trauma and were mainly to the knee.

  • 45.
    Jacobson, Inger
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Range of motion in relation to upcoming sprain and strain injuries among female football players2007In: Abstraktbok Sjukgymnastdagarna 10-12 oktober 2007, Stockholm: LSR , 2007, p. 32-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 46.
    Jacobson, Inger
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Range of motion in relation to upcoming sprain and strain injuries among female football players2007In: Svensk idrottsmedicinsk förenings vårmöte: Uppsala 2007, 2007, p. 42-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Jacobson, Inger
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Skador inom svensk damfotboll2000In: Svensk idrottsmedicinsk förenings vårmöte: Stockholm 2000, Svensk idrottsmedicinsk förening , 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Jakobsson, Bengt
    et al.
    Bodens sjukhus, Anestesikliniken.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Postoperativ smärtlindring vid korsbandskirurgi1990In: Program & sammanfattningar. 47: Älvsjö, Stockholm 5-7 december 1990, Stockholm: Svenska läkaresällskapet , 1990Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Jakobsson, Bengt
    et al.
    Bodens sjukhus, Anestesikliniken.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Postoperative pain prevention with diclofenac and epidural infusion of 0,12% bubivacaine in reconstructive knee surgery: a pilot study1990In: IX Annual Congress of the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia, Bern, Switzerland, September 1990., European Society of Regional Anaesthesia , 1990Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Jonsson, B-A
    et al.
    Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital.
    Stattin, E-L
    Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital.
    Wiklund, F.
    Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute.
    Lindblom, K.
    Department of Experimental Medical Sciences, Lund University.
    Önnverfjord, P.
    Department of Experimental Medical Sciences, Lund University.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Sasaki, T.
    Department of Experimental Medicin I, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg.
    Struglics, A.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University.
    Lohmander, S.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University.
    Dahl, N.
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Heinegård, D.
    Department of Experimental Medical Sciences, Lund University.
    Aspberg, A.
    Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen.
    A missense mutation in the aggrecan C-type lectin domain disrupts extracellular matrix interactions and causes dominant familial osteochondritis dissecans with short stature and early osteoarthritis2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
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