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  • 1.
    Bergvall-Kåreborn, Birgitta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Holst, Marita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Ståhlbröst, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Concept design with a living lab approach2009In: 2009 42nd Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences: HICSS ; Waikoloa, Hawaii, 5 - 8 January 20 / [ed] Ralph H Sprague Jr, IEEE Communications Society, 2009, p. 1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Living Labs is a rather new research area and phenomena that introduces new ways of managing innovation processes. The underlying idea is that people's ideas, experiences, and knowledge, as well as their daily needs of support from products, services, or applications, should be the starting point in innovation. This paper illuminates experiences and accumulated knowledge to the area of concept design in an innovation process within a Living Lab. FormIT, a methodology developed for innovation processes within Living Labs is introduced through an illustration of how it has been utilised in a case. The experiences and the method are related to characteristics of Living Labs, and the paper closes with some concluding remarks in relation to concept design in a Living Lab.

  • 2.
    Bergvall-Kåreborn, Birgitta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Holst, Marita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Ståhlbröst, Anna
    Creating a new leverage point for information systems development2008In: Designing information and organisations with a positive lens, Amsterdam: JAI Press Ltd, 2008, p. 75-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a new approach that shifts the leverage point of information systems development from problem orientation to opportunity development. Our approach, entitled FormIT, employs a careful focus on enhanced user involvement, concentrating on users as human beings, and attention to users’ needs as opposed to system requirements. As theoretical and methodological foundations, we build on the 4-D cycle model of Appreciative Inquiry and current research on needfinding. Our field experience demonstrates that FormIT shifts the systems development process from being reactive to being proactive, and in turn, enables a smoother implementation of inevitable change, particularly radical change. Moreover, FormIT stimulates the generation of rich local knowledge and helps reveal deep insights into the development process and the overall organization.

  • 3.
    Edzen, Svante
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Holst, Marita
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Answers to questions about ”The Creative University”2004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of the evaluation of ”The Creative University” a questionnaire was sent out to all employees of Luleå University of Technology, during May 2002. The three PhD students who are connected to the evaluation prepared the questionnaire. The purpose of the questionnaire was to gain answers to questions posed about three main areas: The employees participation in the work process, the attitudes of the employees about the contents of the new vision and what shape the communication and meetings between employees has taken. In addition to the introductory background questions, the questionnaire was divided into three parts. The three main areas of the investigation were more or less covered in the three parts of the questionnaire. The first part was in reference to the development work done in the first phase, in which the objectives and the vision of the “Creative University” were formulated. The second part of the questionnaire was about the implementation of the new strategy, a process that is still in progress at the university. The questionnaire was divided into different parts in order to see if there was any difference in the pattern of participation for the different phases. In the second part there were also questions pertaining to the availability of information and to what degree the employees cooperate across boarders. Moreover, the respondents were asked to give an account of their views on how they regard the concept of “Integrated Knowledge Building”. The questionnaire ended with a third part in which the respondents were asked to respond to a number of statements about the contents of the vision and it’s implementation. The collective impressions can be said to be that employees of the University have been informed about the contents of the new vision. The goals of the vision receive support, such as recruiting more students, cooperating interdisciplinary, and an increased contact with the surrounding society. However, there appears to be no collective view of the concept of ”Integrated Knowledge Building”. As a last comment the compilation of the results show that many employees do not feel part of the implementation. The process of change has not affected the daily work for the majority of employees

  • 4.
    Holst, Marita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology. Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Enabling boundary-crossing collaboration for innovation: issues for collaborative working environments2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, boundary-crossing collaborative knowledge work aiming for innovation and use of ICT is in focus. The starting point for the research was the proposition that we still have much to learn about boundary- crossing collaboration for innovation and the use of ICT before we can design enabling and supporting ICT and collaborative working environments. Thus, the purpose has been to study and understand collaborative boundary- crossing working groups' activities, as a way to extend the possibilities to design enabling and supporting ICT. To meet this purpose, I wanted to answer the question: How can boundary-crossing collaboration aiming for innovation be enabled in collaborative working environments? Three case studies, with somewhat different focuses, methods and also results, have been performed. Different models as frameworks for both analysis and design have been used in the cases. Main conclusions and contributions of the thesis are given as lessons learned, related to four main areas which were identified from analysis of case data. The first set of conclusions is related to processes and factors enabling knowledge work across boundaries. These are: application of energizing factors, use of boundary objects, addressing roles, norms, values and knowledge assets and, finally, creating dedicated places and spaces. The second set of conclusions is related to ICT issues in boundary- crossing knowledge work. These are: choice of technology, shared virtual platform and models for appreciating technology needs. The third set of conclusions is related to the importance of appreciation of user needs, and methods for this, in the process of designing or developing a collaborative working environment. The fourth set of conclusions comes in the form of reflections on the theoretical models that have been used during the research. There is a need for models and methods that enable design of collaborative environments, as well as models and methods that enable this to be done from a user needs perspective. From the lessons learned, some overarching reflections on implications for collaborative working environments are made. Hence, implications for CWEs as a whole, and some ideas on future research, are presented in the form of a tentative model which can be viewed as a model for designing group processes and relevant technology in a CWE. In this model, designing a CWE and its processes imply more that just designing technology. To conclude, the thesis contributes to the understanding of organisational processes for boundary-crossing collaborative knowledge work through lessons learned, which, in turn, give implications for CWEs.

  • 5. Holst, Marita
    Knowledge work across boundaries: inquiring into the processes of creating a shared context2004Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The problem area focused on in this thesis is knowledge work across boundaries and the processes of information exchange which lead to sharing, creation and use of knowledge and, thus, a shared context. The purpose of the thesis is to explore the management of these processes and which roles information and communication technology are given by the boundary-crossing groups. The relevance of this exploration is based on the importance of learning about knowledge integration in cross-functional projects, since our understanding of how knowledge is integrated within these groups remain limited. In order to inquire into the processes of boundary-crossing knowledge work and information exchange, an interpretative interview study, involving three groups working across knowledge boundaries, was performed. Moreover, the experiences of four student groups were explored. To be able to draw some conclusions from these processes, two models, the POM-model and the Ba- model, focusing on interaction and communication, were used as frameworks for the analysis. The thesis contributes to the existing knowledge of groups working across boundaries and the specific conditions of this, in relation to knowledge sharing, creation and use. Moreover, it makes more explicit the role ICT plays in these processes. Insights and understanding of the processes of creation of a shared context across boundaries give possibilities to more intentionally created conditions for knowledge work. This, in turn, gives support and enables knowledge sharing, creation and use in groups working across boundaries. The lessons learnt from the study are as follows. Different strategies have been used to handle the processes of knowledge creation, sharing and use. In this context I have found that a smaller group that focuses on a boundary object has come furthest in the creation of a shared context. Further, information exchange processes have been the ultimate source for creating the shared context and has been most effectively managed through a balance of physical, virtual and mental contexts. Hence, interplay between different contexts has enabled the groups to create a shared context. ICT has been used to a lesser extent, probably because of the complex nature of the task at hand. In relation to this, the groups argue that the fact that they work across knowledge boundaries has made face-to-face meetings more important. Finally, I have found that the two sense-making-models, used for analysis, complement each other in their respective shortcomings. They offer a potential for designing boundary-crossing knowledge work and its enabling and supporting systems in a holistic way, taking both social and technical aspects into account.

  • 6. Holst, Marita
    Knowledge work across traditional boundaries: a compilation of interviews2004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report is a compilation of ten interviews made with people active in three new Arenas at Luleå University of Technology. The report is intended for the International Evaluation Group connected to the strategic work at the University of Technology in Luleå (LTU). The collected data will be used in a future licentiate thesis. In this report however the material is not completely processed and analyzed. Therefore the report should be considered as a preliminary report containing empirical findings and an early analysis. The purpose with the report is to give illustrative examples of new boundary crossing groups in order to develop our knowledge of how to design for knowledge work. Through the understanding of what experiences people who work in boundary-crossing groups meet when they interact and communicate and in this way create a shared context important input to which issues to consider when we design or chose systems for boundary- crossing knowledge work will be given. The systems I focus on are human activity systems (Checkland 1981) and their supporting systems, i.e. information systems in Checkland’s vocabulary. The results from the interviews are presented in the context of Arenas as a way to keep the respondents anonymous but still in a rich way with the ambition to give a rich picture of the work within the Arenas. Showing how communication, interaction, knowledge creation and the creation of shared context have been done. The resluts show taht all three Arenas have been successful and innovative in that they all have been able to create new undergraduate programs and new research projects. This work have been supported by the social networking which can be viewed as a communications process in which knowledge is shared and new knowledge is created. The creation of a shared knowledge base within the Arenas have facilitated and made the innovation process possible. The social networking gives possibilities for redundant knowledge and this redundancy is essential since it gives the ability to envisage a social system of joint actions. Information and communication technology (ICT) is used to complement these processes and in this way increase the ability to communicate across boundaries in time and space. It has been a natural process to begin work with face to face meetings as a way to create the shared context for the work and that as the process proceeds the respondents now considers virtual media.

  • 7. Holst, Marita
    Needfinding through narrative inquiry in systems design2005In: Internet and information technology in modern organizations: challenges & answers : proceedings of the 5th International Business Information Management Association Conference, December 13-15, 2005, Cairo, Egypt / [ed] Khalid S. Soliman, International Business Information Management Association (IBIMA), 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explicates the process of applying needfinding and narrative inquiry as a way to identify needs and, thus, enable the design of a viable community for knowledge-sharing and creation across boundaries among young entrepreneurs. The specific situation which the design of a knowledge community constitute is discussed and the usefulness of needfinding is thereafter evaluated in relation to the challenges of creating a viable community constructed from participants' identified needs and interests. With a focus on discovering users' needs early on, needfinding involves users throughout the design process, leading to perpetual and persistent user-centred systems.

  • 8.
    Holst, Marita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Project: Advanced Pilots Of Living Labs Operataing in Networks2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The main issues addressed by APOLLON are the present lack of Living Lab harmonisation and collaboration, and the serious difficulties of SMEs in engaging in cross-border innovation. APOLLON will demonstrate the positive impacts of cross-border domain-specific Living Lab networks, by setting up an advanced pilot composed of 4 thematically focused European-wide Living Lab experiments. In the experiments, SMEs are enabled to take part in cross-border Living Lab experiments beyond their home markets, and are supported by large industrial companies, academic centres and other stakeholders. The APOLLON pilot aims at the sharing and harmonisation of Living Lab approaches and platforms between networks of exemplary European Living Labs, and the subsequent evaluation results and the set up of sustainable domain-specific networks on a European and global level. APOLLON addresses 4 major domains in which ICT products and services innovation may benefit most from cross-border Living Lab networking. These are: (1) Homecare and Independent Living, (2) Energy Efficiency, (3) eManufacturing and (4) eParticipation.

  • 9. Holst, Marita
    et al.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    An application of Ba: deconstructing formative processes in multdisciplinary work groups2005In: International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management, ISSN 1447-9524, E-ISSN 1447-9575, Vol. 4, p. 1051-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper draws on an empirical study and examines how new multidisciplinary groups interact to create a shared context for knowledge work. Within the context of the campus-wide commitment to transform itself into a "Creative University", Luleå University of Technology explores new ways to further collaborative multidisciplinary knowledge-creation. Multidisciplinary knowledge areas, such as "Media, Music and Technology", have been defined, originating in multifaceted and complex problems. New knowledge will be shaped through enabling organisational processes created among participants dedicated to realising the full potential of the organisational commitment. Enabling the development of organisational knowledge implies that people from different disciplines - e.g., engineering and social sciences - cooperate and thereby share and use information which they convert into knowledge. The fact that these groups work in partnership in a logical, not physical, organisation leads to questions about how they organise their work, how they communicate, and interact, and where they meet physically, mentally and virtually, and for what purposes. The authors conducted semi-structured interviews with selected employees with the intention of learning from group-members in the new multidisciplinary organisational project. Interview data were analysed in terms of Ba elements. Ba is a perception of a place - which can be virtual, mental or physical - with a shared purpose. Ba provides guidance on "making sense of" how an organisation works and why it works the way it does in relation to knowledge-creation. Predicated on grounded theory about cross-functional work transcending traditional boundaries, Ba can also serve as a framework for designing sustainable new processes that create organisational learning, where information and communication technology are the driving forces.

  • 10.
    Holst, Marita
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Framing multidisciplinary teams: sense making through the POM model2006In: Integrating Visions of Technology: Proceedings of the 12th Annual Working Conference of CPTS / [ed] Andrew Basden; Anita Mirijamdotter; Sytse Strijbos, CPTS , 2006, p. 111-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we focus on Living Labs for promoting and developing collaborative working environments (CWEs). The issues we address in this context are related to knowledge-sharing for innovation. More precisely we explore methodologies for appreciative inquiry that stimulate creativity and facilitate the process for co-creative needfinding and innovation. Additionally we contribute to a European state-of-the-art in utilizing Living Labs to user-centric ICT innovation and to establishing a foundation for a European Network of Living Labs. A pan-European Network of Living Labs brings the extreme benefit of leveraging the concept of a Europe of Regions. However, when interactions are conducted at a distance across organisational, geographical and cultural boundaries, placing at risk the overall competiveness of an organisation, the challenge is to develop tools, methods, and work-practices to manage this interaction. This is the aim of this research. The context and content for this paper is transformation processes in higher education in which knowledge from distinct disciplines are integrated into new multidisciplinary education and research. Checkland's and Holwell's model of Process for Organisational Meanings (POM) is used to present and appreciate the efficacy of these set-up processes. The POM-model is found to be useful for making sense of design work across boundaries and for identifying best practices as it visually represents the important processes of making meaning by interactions among participants in various organisational settings and by means of technology. The results of the study point to best practices for creating shared vision across disciplinary boundaries. Shared visions enable knowledge creation and integration, in turn generating common ground for aligned action and design. Important insights for how to cultivate the fragile processes of setting up multidisciplinary teams are currently lacking. Hence, the findings from this study contribute to set up of multidisciplinary teams successfully. Aware of the start up issues, chances of successful implementation will be enhanced.

  • 11. Holst, Marita
    et al.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    The creation of a shared context in a multdisciplinary setting2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper draws on an empirical study and examines how new multidisciplinary groups interact to create a shared context for knowledge work. Within the context of the campus-wide commitment to transform into a モCreative Universityヤ, Luleå University of Technology explores new ways to further collaborative multidisciplinary knowledge creation. Multidisciplinary knowledge areas, such as ムMedia, Music and Technologyメ, have been defined, with origins in multifaceted and complex problems. New knowledge will be created through enabling environmental processes created among participants committed to realizing the full potential of the organizational commitment. Enabling the development of organizational knowledge implies that people from different disciplines - e.g., engineering and social sciences - cooperate and thereby share and use information which they convert into knowledge. The fact that these groups work in partnership in a logical, not physical, organization leads to questions about how they organize their work, how they communicate, and interact, and where they meet physically, mentally and virtually, and for what purposes. With the intention of learning from group members in a new multidisciplinary organizational project, the authors conducted semi-structured interviews with selected employees. Interview data were analysed in terms of Ba elements. Ba is a perception of a place - which can be virtual, mental or physical - with a shared purpose. Ba provides guidance on ムmaking senseメ of how an organisation works and why it works the way it does in relation to knowledge creation. Predicated on grounded theory about crossfunctional work transcending traditional boundaries, Ba can also serve as a framework for designing sustainable new processes that create organizational learning, where information and communication technology are driving forces.

  • 12.
    Holst, Marita
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Ståhlbröst, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Appreciating needs for innovative IT design2007In: International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management, ISSN 1447-9524, E-ISSN 1447-9575, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 37-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying user needs is important as use of interaction technologies have grown and influence leisure time and work. This paper presents methods for identifying and operationalising needs in design processes

  • 13. Holst, Marita
    et al.
    Ståhlbröst, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Enriching the process of appreciating needs with storytelling2006In: International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society, ISSN 1832-3669, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 61-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explicates the possibility to enrich the process of appreciating needs with storytelling. In this way we are able to identify needs and, thus, facilitate the design process of a viable community for knowledge-sharing and creation across boundaries among young entrepreneurs. The specific situation which the design of a knowledge community constitute is discussed and the usefulness of our approach is thereafter valued in relation to the challenges of creating a viable community constructed from participants' identified needs and interests.

  • 14. Holst, Marita
    et al.
    Ståhlbröst, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Expanding and enriching needfinding with narrative inquiry2005In: Second International Conference on Technology, Knowledge and Society: The Social Ecology of Digital Technologies, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explicates the process of expanding and enriching needfinding through narrative inquiry. In this way we are able to identify needs and, thus, facilitate the design process of a viable community for knowledge-sharing and creation across boundaries among young entrepreneurs. The specific situation which the design of a knowledge community constitute is discussed and the usefulness of our approach is thereafter valued in relation to the challenges of creating a viable community constructed from participants' identified needs and interests.

  • 15.
    Holst, Marita
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Ståhlbröst, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Need-finding through narrative inquiry in systems design2005In: Internet and information technology in modern organizations: Internet and information technology in modern organizations : challenges & answers : proceedings of the 5th International Business Information Management Association Conference, December 13-15, 2005, Cairo, Egypt / [ed] Khalid S Soliman, International Business Information Management Association (IBIMA), 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explicates the process of expanding and enriching need-finding through narrative inquiry. In this way we are able to identify needs and, thus, facilitate the design process of a knowledge community and its virtual spaces for knowledgesharing and creation across boundaries among young entrepreneurs. The specific situation which the design of a knowledge community constitute is discussed and the usefulness of our approach is thereafter valued in relation to the challenges of creating a viable community constructed from participants' identified needs and interests

  • 16.
    Holst, Marita
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Ståhlbröst, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Bergvall-Kåreborn, Birgitta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Openness in living labs: facilitating innovation2010In: Proceedings of the 33rd IRIS Seminar, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation has come to replace efficiency and quality as the main source of competitive advantage for firms from the 1990s onwards. Hence, to an increasing extent, organisations need to consider in which ways they can achieve higher levels of innovative thinking and flexibility. Moreover, the creation of today's complex systems of products, services and processes requires a merging of knowledge from diverse perspectives, e.g. disciplinary or skill-based. One common way to meet these challenges is to set up boundary crossing collaborative groups. The idea is that innovative processes can be fertilised by having people with differentiated knowledge collaborating. Knowledge necessary for innovation and product/service development is, therefore, increasingly distributed both within and across organisations or other types of stakeholders, posing new challenges. To manage these challenges one new approach is evolving, called Living Labs. In this paper we present an innovative development process of a mobile service, taking a Living Lab approach. This paper focus on the effects of openness in an innovation process supported by a Living Lab approach for development of mobile services. The study shows that the innovation process was remarkably shortened in the open and multi-perspective process.

  • 17.
    Krogstie, John
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim.
    Ståhlbröst, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Holst, Marita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Jelle, Tomas
    Wireless Trondheim.
    Kulseng, Lars
    Wireless Trondheim.
    Gudmundsdottir, Ásta
    Innovation Centre Iceland.
    Braskus, Laruynas
    Sunrise Valley.
    Olesen, Annie
    A9 Consulting.
    Using a Living Lab Methodology for Developing Energy Savings Solutions2013In: 19th Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2013: Chicago, IL; 15 -17 August 2013, 2013, Vol. V, p. 3872-3879Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is becoming increasingly important to create a sustainable environment. One important step is to reduce the energyconsumption. In Europe, 25% of the energy used is consumed by private households. How energy is produced and consumedin different European countries varies a lot, thus it is hard to develop general solutions based on country-specific traits. Theaim of this paper is to describe an approach to cross-country development of an energy savings solution. This paper reportson the usage of a method based on collecting users needs related to their current energy consumption, the actions they cantake, and the possible future solutions they want to see.

  • 18. Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Somerville, Mary
    Holst, Marita
    An interactive evaluation approach for the creation of collaborative learning commons2005In: Proceedings of 12th European Conference on Information Technology Evaluation (ECITE 2005), 2005, p. 337-347Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the interactive design and evaluation of Internet2-enabled international students' cooperation/collaboration projects involving students and faculty from four disciplines and from three campuses, two in California, U.S.A. and one in the North of Sweden. The purpose of the collaboration is to collect and exchange information and produce knowledge on what would constitute a student-centered physical and virtual ‘learning commons'. The project construct reflects lessons learned in the 3-year Creative University initiative at Luleå University of Technology, Sweden, as well as the growing shift from academic information commons to ‘learning commons', where the focus is on learning rather than technology. Our distributed, international design and evaluation process is based on principles and practices for action research and builds on theories for knowledge exchange embedded in the concept of Ba, as advanced by Nonaka and others. The Ba model recognizes four stages for making tacit knowledge explicit to enable information sharing and produce new knowledge within shared physical, virtual and mental contexts. To explore the practical feasibility of constituting and linking learning communities to create new disciplinary knowledge, share it across disciplinary communities, and co-create dynamic technology-enabled learning environments, we intentionally employed systems thinking methodology involving discourse, dialogue and communication through which faculty and students created shared meanings. Our report includes reflections on applied interactive evaluation framework and process as well as observations on the efficacy of a variety of technology supported tools for initiating and advancing distributed cooperative and collaborative learning. Our research results are further enriched by commentary on the social implementation factors affecting tool utility. For this kind of endeavour to succeed we need to pay explicit attention to the creation of viable group processes including knowledge assessment activities, influencing infrastructure for enabling technology, and integrate this with pedagogical insights on improving student learning.

  • 19. Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Somerville, Mary M.
    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Library, San José State University.
    Holst, Marita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    An interactive and iterative evaluation approach for creating collaborative learning environments2012In: Leading issues in ICT evaluation, Reading: Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited, 2012, p. 60-81Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Somerville, Mary M.
    San José State University.
    Holst, Marita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    An interactive and iterative evaluation approach for creating collaborative learning environments2006In: Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation, ISSN 1566-6379, E-ISSN 1566-6379, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 83-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inspired by a three-year Creative University ‘arena' initiative at Luleå University of Technology in Sweden, an international team of faculty researchers conducted an exploratory study in 2005, which aimed to investigate the efficacy of an interactive design and evaluation process for technology-enabled collaborative learning environments. This applied research approach was designed as a collaborative evaluation process for co-creation of technology-enabled, learningfocused physical and virtual ‘learning commons.' Faculty researchers from Sweden and the United States used Soft Systems Methodology tools, including the Process for Organisational Meanings (POM) model, to guide sixty-two students' participatory co-design and evaluation activities. In this paper, the POM evaluation model is explained and related to the Japanese concept Ba. Application of the models is illustrated within the context of student learning through boundary crossing information exchange and knowledge creation. As evidenced in their iterative and interactive evaluative recommendations, students' learning outcomes included development of improved capabilities for identifying socio-technical elements of distributed learning environments, suggesting that student beneficiaries can successfully reflect upon their experiences and provide valuable evaluation insights. In addition, when this evaluation is iterative, students' insights into project management, software needs, and services design can improve their technology-enabled learning experiences. Concluding comments explore the efficacy of the POM model implementation for guiding other learning-focused, user-centric initiatives, which aim to promote interdisciplinary, or boundary crossing, exchanges concurrent with advancing team-based knowledge creation proficiencies among project participants.

  • 21.
    Rizk, Aya
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Johansson, Jan-Olov
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Holst, Marita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Heijnen, Adriënne
    Palacios, Belén
    Lynch, John
    Harderberg, Esben
    Lindstrøm, Michelle
    Christophersen, Sebastian
    Cuenca, Juan
    Gutiérrez, Veronica
    Theodoridis, Evangelos
    Etienne, Gandrille
    Co-Creating Smart Cities of the Future: First Open Call Instructions2016Report (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Runardotter, Mari
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Holst, Marita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Views on Energy Efficiency: Findings from the CASSANDRA project2014In: 2014 20th International ICE Conference on Engineering, Technology and Innovation (ICE 2014): Bergamo, Italy; 23 - 25 June 2014, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 2014, article id 6871610Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present findings from the CASSANDRA project, in the area of energy efficiency. We set out to explore what view on energy efficiency elderly individual tenants and the European Union (EU) convey, respectively, as well as whether their respective views differ or not. Data used are a) qualitative interviews with 15 tenants at a multi-residential building for elderly people; and b) EU Directives in relation to energy efficiency. We find that environmental concerns are shared by both parties, and that resources are limited is also agreed upon. Where they differ is around growth and lack of information, of which the first is not an issue for the tenants, and the other they regard to be wrong – they see themselves as informed. Of specific interest was whether the tenants was aware, knowledgeable and motivated or not, since this is regarded to be preconditions for energy efficiency, according to the EU. Our findings show that most individual consumers show great concern for the environment, and they claim that they are raised and taught in being economic with all resources.

  • 23.
    Ståhlbröst, Anna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Bergvall-Kåreborn, Birgitta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Holst, Marita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Understanding innovation community users2009In: Proceedings of the XX ISPIM Conference, Vienna, Austria, 21-24 June 2009 / [ed] K.R.E. Huizingh; S. Conn; M. Torkkeli; I. Bitran, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, we are facing new and challenging situations with the growing financial crisis and the difficult times for companies with a decreasing number of customers and declining revenues. It is therefore important for companies to challenge their way of thinking and developing innovations. An up-coming approach to innovation is to open up the innovation process and to include users in this process. Due to immaturity of this approach, there is little knowledge on how these communities should be designed and used to really support companies’ innovation processes. In this paper, we illustrate how and why users engage in innovation communities, as well as the nature of these users. We do this with the objective to render results that can guide companies on how to utilize their on-line user communities in order to accelerate user’s participation in open innovation processes.

  • 24.
    Ståhlbröst, Anna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Holst, Marita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Living Lab: Stimulating Adoption of Smart City Innovations2016In: Open Living Lab Days 2016: Research Day Conference Proceedings, Montreal: European Network of Living Lab , 2016, p. 145-162Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cities are facing complex and widespread problems such as changing demographics, reduction of resources and climate changes, unequal social participation, overfilled transport networks, and difficult trade-offs in land use decisions can only be turned into opportunities if suitable strategies are applied. To facilitate the efforts related to creating and sustaining smart city development, supportive infrastructures and innovative eco-systems need to be implemented and used, and one such infrastructure can be the concept of Living Labs. These Living Labs deploy contemporary open and user driven innovation processes into real world contexts in which all relevant stakeholders are involved and engaged with the endeavour to create and experiment with innovations. In this paper, we will illustrate and discuss a Living Lab approach focusing on a way to stimulate adoption of smart cities innovations among citizens in their domestic context and thus lowering their energy consumption. Our findings show that applying a Living Lab approach for adoption of innovation was successful in several ways. By stimulating participants to use the socio-technical solution in their context by assigning them well-defined tasks, participants both increased their understanding of the socio-technical solution, they changed their behaviour and they fulfilled the purpose of the technology. Hence, applying an interactive Living Lab approach in innovation processes can strengthen the adoption of smart city solutions.

  • 25.
    Ståhlbröst, Anna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Holst, Marita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Reflecting on Actions in Living Lab Research2017In: Technology Innovation Management Review, ISSN 1927-0321, E-ISSN 1927-0321, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 27-34, article id 1055Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Living labs deploy contemporary open and user-centred engagement processes in real-world contexts where all relevant stakeholders are involved and engaged with the endeavour to create and experiment with different innovations. The approach is evidently successful and builds on the perspective that people have a democratic right to have influence over changes that might affect them, such as those brought about by an innovation. In this article, we will reflect on and discuss a case in which end users took part in the development of a method that stimulates learning and adoption of digital innovations in their own homes while testing and interacting with it. The results show that, when end users were stimulated to use the implemented innovation through different explicit assignments, they both increased their understanding of the situation as well as changed their behaviour. Living lab processes are complex and dynamic, and we find that it is essential that a living lab have the capability to adjust its roles and actions. We argue that being reflective is beneficial for innovation process managers in living labs because it allows them to adjust processes in response to dynamic circumstances.

  • 26.
    Ståhlbröst, Anna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Holst, Marita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Bergvall-Kåreborn, Birgitta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Sällström, Annika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Striving for realism in a user involvement process2009In: Proceedings of the 2nd ISPIM Innovation Symposium: Stimulating Recovery - The Role of Innovation Management, New York City, USA 6-9 december 2009 / [ed] K.R.E. Huizingh; S. Conn; M. Torkkeli; I. Bitran, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, it is commonly acknowledged that it is important to learn from users when the aim is to develop user-centred services and products. This is shown in the fact that a lot of the commercially important innovations that are developed today are developed by end-users. When it comes to innovation, it is burdened with uncertainty and the only way to get input on users reactions, is to start developing it and to let users use it. One way to involve users in the process of innovation development is the Living Lab approach in which one guiding principle is realism. In this paper, the aim is to define and illustrate how the Living Lab principle realism takes form and is facilitated in a mobile service development project described in this paper. We found that realism takes different forms dependent on in which phase the innovation process is.

  • 27.
    Ståhlbröst, Anna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Holst, Marita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Krogstie, John
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim.
    Gudmundsdottir, Asta
    Innovation Centre Iceland.
    Olesen, Annie
    A9 Consulting.
    Braskus, Laruynas
    Sunrise Valley.
    Jelle, Thomas
    Wireless Trondheim.
    Users and Energy Savings - Their Perspectives and Needs2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is becoming increasingly important to create a sustainable environment for the future. This is a problem that is recognised but it still not evident what kind of solutions that would be beneficial and useful. However, one important step is to reduce the energy consumption. In Europe, 25% of the total amount of energy being consumed is consumed by private households. Hence, if private households decrease their energy consumption this would contribute to the environment in positive ways. The aim of this paper is to describe what kind of needs users have related to energy consumption and solutions for that. Our study have been carried out in a project called Smarties in which the objective is to develop solutions that stimulates users to decrease their energy consumption. This paper reports on the users needs related to their current energy consumption situation, the actions they want or can take, and the possible future solutions they want to se.

  • 28.
    Ståhlbröst, Anna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Sällström, Annika
    Holst, Marita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    User evaluations in the wild: experiences from mobile living labs2009In: Mobile Living Labs 09: Methods and Tools for Evaluation in the Wild, 2009, p. 7-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Involving users has become a prerequisite these days in ITproduct and service development processes; hence, the question is not so much about why we should involve users, but rather how they should be involved. Embracing a Living Lab approach means to strive to involve users throughout the innovation process and to make users engaged co-creators of the innovation. In this paper, we present different degrees of user involvement in design and evaluation processes and relate these to our experiences of involving users in Mobile Living Lab situations. We identify aspects we have grappled with in these process and issues that needs to be elaborated on further since the area of Mobile Living Lab is growing and concepts such as ubiquitous computing and context awareness is emerging. This in turn, sets new demands on methods for user involvement in the wild.

1 - 28 of 28
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